Genetics T-M184 Discussion

Allah and El both mean "The God" in Arabic and Hebrew, respectively. They still had a pantheon of minor gods and goddesses.

Zoroastrians were the first monotheistic religion group and worshipped Ahura Mazda as their chief god, but even they worshipped minor gods and spirits.
‘Judeo-Christian/Islamic’ monotheism was first practiced by Cushites. The concept of a single god associated with the sky and evil represented by spirits.

These ideas were from the Nile valley but Cushites were first to adopt it according to Ehret.
 
‘Judeo-Christian/Islamic’ monotheism was first practiced by Cushites. The concept of a single god associated with the sky and evil represented by spirits.

These ideas were from the Nile valley but Cushites were first to adopt it according to Ehret.
Source?

How do you explain Waaq being completely missing from northern Somali? I've never heard of it except online. Central and Southern Somali clans, especially Daroods, seem to have it in the abtirsi and town names.
 

Alexis

Haplogroup T activist.
Source?

How do you explain Waaq being completely missing from northern Somali? I've never heard of it except online. Central and Southern Somali clans, especially Daroods, seem to have it in the abtirsi and town names.
I was about to say that.
 
Source?

How do you explain Waaq being completely missing from northern Somali? I've never heard of it except online. Central and Southern Somali clans, especially Daroods, seem to have it in the abtirsi and town names.
i think it is just a coincidence in naming tbh. most likley has nothing to do with waaqfimo oromo religion
 
just some oromo religion that got hyped by Somali gaal's a couple years ago. the only religions we know for sure Somali's practiced before the advent of Islam was Christianity and Judaism.
It's not straight-forward. Some Somali clan names are made up by two words compounded together that contain Waaq, such as my clan JidWaaq which roughly translates to "Path of the Lord". It could possibly indicate my clan was a priestly one in the pre-Islamic era.

Some Pre-Islamic Somalis likely practiced their own version of Waaqism that was distinct from the Oromo version, just like how Pre-Christian Anglo-Saxons/English folks practised a Germanic faith that was distinct from the version practised by Norsemen etc.
 
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It's not straight-forward. Some Somali clan names are made up by two words compounded together that contain Waaq, such as my clan JidWaaq which roughly translates to "Path of the Lord". It could possibly indicate this clan was a priestly one in the pre-Islamic era.

Some Pre-Islamic Somalis likely practices their own version of Waaqism that was distinct from the Oromo version, just like how Pre-Christian Anglo-Saxons/English folks practised a Germanic faith that was distinct from the version practised by Norsemen etc.
laakin the only Somali word for God is Ebe. Your clan was probably influence by Galla pagans before Islam like @Prince Abubu state earlier, no northern qabiil has Waaq in their qabiil names.
 

Alexis

Haplogroup T activist.
‘Judeo-Christian/Islamic’ monotheism was first practiced by Cushites. The concept of a single god associated with the sky and evil represented by spirits.

These ideas were from the Nile valley but Cushites were first to adopt it according to Ehret.
just some oromo religion that got hyped by Somali gaal's a couple years ago. the only religions we know for sure Somali's practiced before the advent of Islam was Christianity and Judaism.
Won't say any of these were actually practiced by us, at least we don't know it for sure.
But yeah, I'm really getting iritated by all the somalis who think waaqafeena as practiced by some minor Oromo groups is what we used to practice only because of few words that some minorities retained.

Where is the word Eebe from ?
 
Source?

How do you explain Waaq being completely missing from northern Somali? I've never heard of it except online. Central and Southern Somali clans, especially Daroods, seem to have it in the abtirsi and town names.
I’ll try to find the book.

Ehret was discussing the agricultural developments of the proto Cushites and briefly touched on their migration and their concept of spirituality which was a product of the Nile valley.

Our Afro-Asiatic ancestors practiced a form of henotheism. Each community had their own monotheistic deity associated with the family/clan/ethnic group. In some cases, it turned into polytheism over time. A great example is the first dynasty of the old kingdom in Ancient Egypt. All the different local deities had to be incorporated in order to solidify the unification.

I can also clarify that Waaq/Waaqa is proto East Cushitic and it means “to rise up”. It doesn’t mean “sky god”, it was loosely translated as divinity by some linguists because it’s connected to the proto Cushitic concept of spirituality. This concept existed among the Beja as well but the term Waaq/Waaqa is absent from their vocabulary.

Only East Cushitic (Highland + Lowland) and South Cushitic use the term Waaq/Waaqa.
 
just some oromo religion that got hyped by Somali gaal's a couple years ago. the only religions we know for sure Somali's practiced before the advent of Islam was Christianity and Judaism.
What evidence do you have for this? I've never heard of Somalis being anything other than Muslim. Judaism and Christianity is completely absent from our history, if you exclude the colonial era Christian missionaries.
 
I’ll try to find the book.

Ehret was discussing the agricultural developments of the proto Cushites and briefly touched on their migration and their concept of spirituality which was a product of the Nile valley.

Our Afro-Asiatic ancestors practiced a form of henotheism. Each community had their own monotheistic deity associated with the family/clan/ethnic group. In some cases, it turned into polytheism over time. A great example is the first dynasty of the old kingdom in Ancient Egypt. All the different local deities had to be incorporated in order to solidify the unification.

I can also clarify that Waaq/Waaqa is proto East Cushitic and it means “to rise up”. It doesn’t mean “sky god”, it was loosely translated as divinity by some linguists because it’s connected to the proto Cushitic concept of spirituality. This concept existed among the Beja as well but the term Waaq/Waaqa is absent from their vocabulary.

Only East Cushitic (Highland + Lowland) and South Cushitic use the term Waaq/Waaqa.
Cool, let me know what the book is when you get the chance. There's a stunning lack of academic studies on the Cushites/Cushitic speakers.

How do you explain the lack of "Waaq" in Northern Somalia? Also, if the T-haplo carriers were south Semitic migrants, how come there's no evidence in our culture or language? Compare Somali to the Habesha for instance.
 
Northern Somalia wasn't Christian prior to the arrival of Islam. The whole myth of Isaaq is him defeating some Waaqist in Hargeisa in the 13th century. Christianity was likely restricted to areas that went through continental trade routes, Waaq beliefs were still the majority.
 
Northern Somalia wasn't Christian prior to the arrival of Islam. The whole myth of Isaaq is him defeating some Waaqist in Hargeisa in the 13th century. Christianity was likely restricted to areas that went through continental trade routes, Waaq beliefs were still the majority.

I think you're mistaking Isaaq with Yusuf Aw Barkhadle. Aw Barkhadle was the one that, allegedly, defeated the pagans in Northern Somalia.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yusuf_bin_Ahmad_al-Kawneyn
 
The point still stands that large portions of Somalis still would have been Waaqist as late as the 13th century which probably indicates that Christianity didn't make as large of an Impact within Somalis.
True, Christianity and Judaism is foreign to Northern Somalia. But I'm just struggling to believe that the north was "waaqist" as there is no evidence of it in our dialect, toponomy and lineage.
 

Apollo

Staff Member
Moderator
True, Christianity and Judaism is foreign to Northern Somalia. But I'm just struggling to believe that the north was "waaqist" as there is no evidence of it in our dialect, toponomy and lineage.
Northwest you mean, there is plenty of evidence for the Northeast.

The Siwaaqroon live geographically to the north of most Isaaq.

 

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