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Thanks, i linked that in a thread i made last month. It is interesting seeing as there are some words that are roughly the same in Oromo and Afar and Saho etc, but vastly different in Somali

Yeah, I wish there were more readily available books on the subject. I've become very interested Afro-Asiatic languages, especially Cushitic-Egyptian-Semitic.

There seems to be some words in Somali that have morphed away from the other East Cushitic languages. Almost like Somali/Rendille separated first from the other Low East Cushitic tongues.
 
These are a few words from the High East Cushitic languages, like Sidaamo

The only ones I recognise are:

Sidaamo - Somali
Daadd "flow" - Daad "flood"

Hadiyya - Somali
Dagieera "monkey" - Daayeer "monkey"

Burji - Somali
Dax-aa/dagh "stone" - Somali "dhagax"

Kambaata - Somali
Far "finger" - Far "finger"

Burji - Somali
Tear "cloth" - Dhar " clothes"

It goes on and on.

http://khakas.altaica.ru/cgi-bin/response.cgi?root=config]&morpho=0&basename=\data\semham\hecet&first=81

More work needs to be done on cushitic languages, looking at their wikipedia is upsetting, very short:mugshotman:

@Kaleel Could we ever have a linguistics/languages section
 
According to Peter Behrens (1981) and Marianne Bechaus-Gerst (2000), linguistic evidence indicates that the Kerma peoples spoke Afro-Asiatic languages of the Cushitic branch.[12][13] The Nilo-Saharan Nobiin language today contains a number of key pastoralism related loanwords that are of proto-Highland East Cushitic origin, including the terms for sheep/goatskin, hen/cock, livestock enclosure, butter and milk. This in turn suggests that the Kerma population — which, along with the C-Group Culture, inhabited the Nile Valley immediately before the arrival of the first Nubian speakers

Kerma Culture
 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerma_Culture

"Dental trait analysis of Kerma fossils found that they were closely related to Afroasiatic-speaking populations inhabiting Northeast Africa and the Maghreb. Among the ancient populations, the Kerma people were nearest to the A-Group culture bearers and Kush populations in Upper Nubia, followed by the Meroitic, X-Group and Christian period inhabitants of Lower Nubia and the Kellis population in the Dakhla Oasis, as well as C-Group and Pharaonic era skeletons excavated in Lower Nubia and ancient Egyptians (Naqada, Badari, Hierakonpolis, Abydos and Kharga in Upper Egypt; Hawara in Lower Egypt). Among the recent groups, the Kermans were morphologically closest to Afroasiatic-speaking populations in the Horn of Africa, followed by the Shawia and Kabyle Berber populations of Algeria as well as Bedouin groups in Morocco, Libya and Tunisia. The A-Group skeletons and these ancient and recent fossils were also phenotypically distinct from those belonging to recent Negroid populations in Sub-Saharan Africa.[15]"

The Cushites hang together. B1b1b. They were not negroid.

Recognize anybody?



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerma#/media/File:Beelden_van_Kerma.jpg

Kings of Kush:

1280px-Beelden_van_Kerma.jpg
 

Zayd

Habar Magaadle
Very interesting, so when did we break off from our Cushitic brothers? Is this like Europe and indo European languages?
 

Apollo

Staff Member
Very interesting, so when did we break off from our Cushitic brothers? Is this like Europe and indo European languages?

European languages are significantly more similar as they had a longer tradition of literacy and standardization of language.
 

Zayd

Habar Magaadle
European languages are significantly more similar as they had a longer tradition of literacy and standardization of language.
I'm talking ancient not the last 2000 years, when they weren't literate at all.

The whole theme of all Northern European languages coming from the same branch somewhere in the caucuses, Idk if this is a myth.
 

Apollo

Staff Member
I'm talking ancient not the last 2000 years, when they weren't literate at all.

The whole theme of all Northern European languages coming from the same branch somewhere in the caucuses, Idk if this is a myth.

They had contacts with Greeks, Hebrews, Persians and other ''literate'' cultures.

Cushites were mostly cut off from those groups.
 
Very interesting, so when did we break off from our Cushitic brothers? Is this like Europe and indo European languages?

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Cushitic-languages

"Cushitic languages, a division of the Afro-Asiatic phylum, comprising about 40 languages that are spoken mainly in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia, and northwestern Kenya. There are six major subdivisions within the Cushitic family: Beja; Tanzania), including Iraqw, Burunge, and Gorowa, the hybrid language Maʾa/Mbugu, and (in Kenya) Dahalo; Saho-Afar, and Oromo and its close relatives such as Konso; and the Omo-Tana group, with languages such as Somali, Rendille, and Boni."

The Southeastern Cushites were all present at Namoratunga in Kenya, presumably speaking the same language, in 300 BC. There were no pastoralists in the area before 4000 YA, so the language divisions are relatively recent.
 
Afar and Somali have the exact same phonology, with Afar missing 'kh' that is technically foreign to Somali so doesn't count.

Oromo, Sidamo and Agew have significantly different phonology.
 
Some scholars consider it not too be cushitic, it does seem quite different

Yeah, if I look really hard I can see some connections between numbers 1, 2 and 4 but they're really subtle. If I was a betting man, I would bet Beja's in it's own category between Egyptian and Cushitic.
 
Yeah, if I look really hard I can see some connections between numbers 1, 2 and 4 but they're really subtle. If I was a betting man, I would bet Beja's in it's own category between Egyptian and Cushitic.
Yeah, it sounds quite different too, like a mix of all cushitic languages with a mix of something foreign
 

Apollo

Staff Member
Yeah, if I look really hard I can see some connections between numbers 1, 2 and 4 but they're really subtle. If I was a betting man, I would bet Beja's in it's own category between Egyptian and Cushitic.

They are connected mostly with the Agaw.

PS. Beja is more or less a dead language. It is not going to survive the 21st century. All the young Bejas are language shifting to Sudanese Arabic.
 
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