Acute food crisis looms in Somaliland, resulting from the war in Ukraine

Manafesto

[[Puntland Republic 🇸🇱]]PIM[[C.S(BihinYusuf)]
VIP
HalimoEnthusiast
Somalilanders blame Somalia's government for the famine engulfing the FMS. The comments on this portrays what the average Somalilander is the cause of this repeating famine on their federal member state, the FGS, although they SL has denounced to sit with the FGS multiple times during last decade.



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bidenkulaha

GalYare
VIP

300% inflation. Shocking to hear.

8% in Somalia proper so I’m wondering if the Somaliland Shilling has collapsed. Only explanation. Xamar’s economy is dollarised so will be less affected by inflation

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IMF report out yesterday shows 8.5% inflation in Somalia this year which is set to drop to 3.6% next year.

Unfortunately I expect to see a lot more SL refugees in Xamar. I worry for the future of that region as it continues to isolate itself from the FGS and the brain drain continues.
 
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Laagite

Moorasante
Somalilanders blame Somalia's government for the famine engulfing the FMS. The comments on this portrays what the average Somalilander is the cause of this repeating famine on their federal member state, the FGS, although they SL has denounced to sit with the FGS multiple times during last decade.



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The hike in living standards have made Somalilanders import from Bosaso as oppose to Berbera
 
Market Update Issued March 28, 2022

Inflation:


Somali Shilling (SOS)-using areas: Consumer Price Index (CPI) increased (1-3%) in January and February 2022 in central, southern regions and northeast regions. Compared to the five-year average for January and February (2017-2021), CPI increased significantly (29-45%) across all regions of Somalia due to increased prices of sorghum (the main local cereal used in the consumption basket) and increases in imported food prices this year. Somaliland Shilling (SLS)-using areas: CPI increased (10%) in January but declined slightly (5%) in February in northwest regions. CPI increased (8-14%) in northwest regions compared to the five year average for January and February (2017-2021).

Exchange rate:

SOS-using areas: Exchange rates between SOS and the United States Dollar (USD) remained relatively stable in most regions of Somalia in January and February 2022. Compared to the five-year averages for January and February (2017-2021), SOS depreciated at moderate rates (6- 13%) in central and southern regions of the country in January and February 2022. However, SOS depreciated significantly against the USD in northeast region (36-37% in January and February 2022) due to continued circulation of large amount of locally printed SOS currency notes in these markets in recent years. Consequently, traders and the community continued to reject the use of the locally issued Somali Shilling in the northeast regions.

SLS-using areas: the exchange rate between SLS and USD remained stable in both January and February 2022 compared to a month ago but appreciated slightly (3-5%) compared to the five-year average for January and February (2017-2021).

Local cereal (white maize, red sorghum and white sorghum prices):


Local cereal prices mostly exhibited mild to moderate changes (≤ ±10% - mostly increases) in most regions of the country in January and February 2022. Specifically, white maize prices increased in Shabelle (5% in January and 4% in February) and in Juba Valley (1% in January but declined 6% in February due to limited offseason harvest); white maize prices declined in Banadir in January (3%) but increased (10%) in February. Red sorghum prices increased in Sorghum Belt in January (9%) but remained stable in February and increased in central regions in January and February (2-3%). While white sorghum prices increased in northwest regions in January (6%) but decreased mildly in February (1%). White sorghum prices declined slightly in Hiran in January and February (3-5%) due to slightly improved supply from off-season harvest from irrigated farms in riverine areas. The increases in other regions can be attributed to low market supply because of consecutive poor and failed harvests, including the 2021 Deyr harvest.

Similarly, compared to the five-year averages for January and February (2017-2021), local cereal prices were substantially higher (31-101%) in most regions due to reduced supply this year. Specifically, white maize prices increased in Banadir (46-58%), Juba (55-66%) and Shabelle (69-73%). Markets that recorded significant increases in white maize prices both in January and February include Jamame (93-103%), Qoryolei (96-97%), Jowhar (76-90%), Sakoow (106% in January), and Hagar (71% in February). Red sorghum prices increased in central (39-45%), northeast (60-69%) and Sorghum Belt (97-101%); red sorghum prices were also significantly higher both in January and February in El-Barde (111-154%), Baidoa (136-159%), Dinsor (199-246%), Qansah-Dhere (194-200%) and Bardera (129- 140%). White sorghum prices increased in January and February in northwest (31-32%) and Hiran (45-48%) compared to five year average.

Prices of imported food items (rice, sugar, vegetable oil, wheat flour)

Exhibited mild to moderate changes (≤ ±10% - mostly increases) in January and February 2022 across most regions of Somalia for most food imports mainly attributable to rising global food prices. Compared to the five-year average, prices of most food imports were higher in most regions of Somalia: southern regions (9-28% for rice, 20-28% for sugar, 47-104% for vegetable oil and 20-34% for wheat flour); central regions (30-33% for rice, 25-29% for sugar, 52-55% for vegetable oil and 36-38% for wheat flour); and northwest (12-14% for rice, 8-11% for sugar, 26-35% for vegetable oil and 12-14% for wheat flour). These price increases are mainly due to rising food prices on the international market this year. Prices of imported food items were also significantly higher compared to the five-year averages for January and February (2017-2021) in northeast markets (58-59% for rice, 46-49% for sugar, 101-108% for vegetable oil and 68% for wheat flour). This is mainly due to depreciation of the local SOS currency as well as rising food prices on the international market this year.



Livestock (local quality goat and camel)

Prices mostly decreased at mild to moderate rates (≤14%) in January and February 2022 in most regions likely due to the deterioration of livestock body condition as a result of prevailing drought conditions in the country. However, compared to the five-year average, livestock prices in January and February 2022 exhibited mixed trend patterns: goat prices were lower in Banadir in January (2%) and Sorghum Belt (17-22%) due to deterioration of body conditions but remained above the five-year average in other regions: Juba (11-14%), Shabelle (21-25%), central (11-14%), and northwest (3% in February). Goat price increases were even higher in northeast regions (54-60%) due to depreciation of the local currency and limited market supply. Similarly, camel prices mostly increased in January 2022 in most regions: Sorghum Belt and Shabelle (2-4%), Juba (26-51%), Central (14% in January), northwest (2% in February and northeast (49-56% in both January and February). Milk prices (camel and cattle) mostly increased at mild to moderate rates (≤ ±16%) in January and February 2022 in most regions of the country due to reduced milk availability as a result of ongoing drought conditions. Compared to the five-year average for January and February (2017-2021), cattle milk prices mostly exhibited moderate to high increases in south (15-40%) and central (9-21%) but slightly lower in northwest (9%) and moderately lower in northeast (24-26%) regions. On the other hand, camel milk prices mostly exhibited increases in south (4-57%) and northeast (18-26%) but decreased in northwest (2-4%) and central (5% in January).

Labour (unskilled) wages

Remained relatively stable or changed at mild rates (≤± 7%; mostly decreases) in most regions across the country in January and February 2022. Compared to the five-year average, labor wages are higher (1-67%) in most regions in January and February 2022. However, labour wage rates were lower in Juba (5% in January and 4% in February) and Sorghum Belt (4% in January and 2% in February) compared to the five-year average due to limited labour opportunities in the region as a result of active conflict in some of the areas.
 

FBIsomalia

True Puntlander
VIP
Somalilanders blame Somalia's government for the famine engulfing the FMS. The comments on this portrays what the average Somalilander is the cause of this repeating famine on their federal member state, the FGS, although they SL has denounced to sit with the FGS multiple times during last decade.



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PL worked for this almost four years in-case their is inflation or famine. SL maybe its new to them cause most of development money goes to Sool wars against us.
 

Vanessa

◦•●💙 galkacyo 🤍 bila 💚●•◦
VIP
Pls share links to donate money for famine-affected Somalis
 

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