WARNING TO SOMALIS TRAVELING IN ETHIOPIA

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Young Popeye

Call me pops
Ethiopia: Two killed in unrest in eastern Ethiopia
ESAT News (September 12, 2017)


Two people were killed and several others wounded in the ongoing clashes between the Somali and Oromo communities in eastern Ethiopia as the president of the Somali region, Abdi Omar, reportedly decreed the Oromos to leave the region.

The Oromos held protest rallies in Aweday, Deder, Kobo, and Chinaksen towns today against the violent actions of the Somali Liyou Police that has been blamed for the death of several people in the ongoing turf war between the two communities.

Six cars, including a military vehicle, were set ablaze while transportations to Addis Ababa, Jijiga and neighboring towns were disrupted.

Information received by ESAT show several Oromos in Somali region were heading to the city of Harar following Abdi Omar’s order to leave the Somali region. Hundreds have taken refuge at eastern command military base.

Four students were injured last week when a grenade was thrown into a school in Meiso, Harar. Reports also say six people were injured in the ensuing shootout in the town.

The explosion came a day after a failed meeting between the two communities in which the Oromo representatives walked out in protest against a proposed map showing their land incorporated into the Somali region.

A communal clash has been going for few months now between the Oromos and Somali communities in west Hararghe where the Oromos accuse the Somali region special police forces have killed several of their people. There were also reports of killings of members of the Liyou police by the Oromos.

https://ethsat.com/2017/09/ethiopia-two-killed-unrest-eastern-ethiopia/
we will not tolerate illey pushing oromos into harar, we have enough of them. so the liyu must either guard harar or we will ship them back
 

Young Popeye

Call me pops
Thanks to ilay and his dogs who killed oromos, this was predicted. Somalis should direct their anger at ilay and his dogs :manny:
ofcourse you had no issues when SL removed all the oromos from the area in the 17th century. i dont think illey would ethnically cleanse them like SL did.
 

Agent 47

21st Divsion of Somali National Army
So af maay is similar to oromo. Af maay is usually called a dialect of somali by its native speakers however linguists have concluded that it is a separate cushitic language of its own with little sprinkles of somali words here & there. :leon:

So ur right about it being cushitic & i'm right about it not being somali.
:mjpls:
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It's closer to Somali than Oromo:farmajoyaab:
The nigga is clearly saying "Sida adiga ku jeclahay adiga ma iijaceshahay" And the raxanweyn intermarried with the Somali bantus so much that the Bantus speak af maay:farmajoyaab:

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The oromos may have the numbers lakin somalis have the mainland Somalia who can supply them with wepons if needed, iskaa dhiicya niimanka
What somali can supply somalis in k5? They will get handed over for even entertaining such thoughts.
 
I'm pleased to see someone has figured this out. The old histories need revision.

Those who still believe that Isaaq and Darood were "J", married "T" Dir women and had E1b1b children need to read up on the inheritance of haplotypes.

The Orma settled Af Madow in the 1600s. Some were driven back into Kenya by Darood Somalis, but others were absorbed by the Rahanweyn.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maay_Maay

"Maay is principally spoken by the Digil and Mirifle (Rahanweyn or Sab) clans in the southern regions of Somalia.[3] Its speech area extends from the southwestern border with Ethiopia to a region close to the coastal strip between Mogadishu and Kismayo, including the city of Baidoa.[4] Maay is not mutually comprehensible with Northern Somali or Benadir, and it differs considerably in sentence structure and phonology.[5] It is also not generally used in education or media. However, Maay speakers often use Standard Somali as a lingua franca,[4] which is learned via mass communications, internal migration and urbanisation.[5]

Maay is closely related with the Jiido, Dabarre, Garre and Tunni languages that are also spoken by smaller Rahanweyn communities. Collectively, these languages present similarities with Oromo that are not found in mainstream Somali. Chief among these is the lack of pharyngeal sounds in the Rahanweyn/Digil and Mirifle languages, features which by contrast typify Somali. The retroflex /ɖ/ is also replaced by /r/ in some positions. Although in the past frequently classified as dialects of Somali, more recent research by the linguist Mohamed Diriye Abdullahi has shown that these varieties, including Maay, constitute separate Cushitic languages. They may thus represent traces of an Oromo substratum in the southern Rahanweyn confederacy.[6]"

"He's wrong cause he's Wight" (I never said this, dementia is interfering with your reading comprehension) is a lousy argument that would get itself lost with even the simplest of reading. The links are there, people.
Finally you reveal true intention, by going from linguistics to genetics, to define our origins according to white supremacy and revisionism tradition according to Berlin Conference of 1884–1885.

http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/imperialism/notes/berlinconference.html

http://www.academia.edu/11527926/Th..._and_the_Historicisation_of_International_Law

During the Berlin Conference, ethiopia was the only country in Africa to join in with the colonials due to their anglo-saxon puppet status afforded to them by the british crown and the Hon. East Africa Company.

Crackers and tigrays have co-operated since 1885, and you stll can't defeat us.


You're an old and sad, sad man. You're 3x older than most of us on this website. No one here considers you an authority on their Somali ancestors, whatever qabil they are. Go and do something productive with your life.
 
Why do I get the feeling that Grant and Foreman are one in the same. They even joined within 1 month of one another in 2015...

Grant is literally having a conversation with himself :drakelaugh:
 

yuusufdiin

child of afgooye
It's closer to Somali than Oromo:farmajoyaab:
The nigga is clearly saying "Sida adiga ku jeclahay adiga ma iijaceshahay" And the raxanweyn intermarried with the Somali bantus so much that the Bantus speak af maay:farmajoyaab:

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you're mostly right but they speak af maay because they live with us and with the intermarrying its not that much tbh there are full blood somali bantu's part of D&M because we use to own them as slaves back in the day and gave them our last names when we freed them so they joined our tribe that way not by actual lineage, this happened mostly within digil, a few hawiye and dir tribes did the same thing
 
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you're mostly right but they speak af maay because they live with us and with the intermarrying its not that much tbh there are full blood somali bantu's part of D&M because we use to own them as slaves back in the day and gave them our last names when we freed them so they joined our tribe that way not by actual lineage, this happened mostly within digil, a few hawiye and dir tribes did the same thing
You mean Eyl?

Fara Oumari Mohamud informed the delegation that the Eyle were treated as slaves by the main Somali clans. They had no protection from any clan and their relationships with the clans in their home areas (Rahanweyn, Hawadle) were not good. Also for religious reasons, they were treated as outcasts. There are no physical differences between the Eyle and the surrounding Somali clans. There was no intermarriage between the Eyle and the major Somali clans. There were no Eyle in government institutions, and there are no Eyle involved in the Arta peace process at the present time. Eyle could intermarry with some Benadiri and with Tumaal, but not with Yibir. Lewis (1994a) describes the Eyle as clients of the Rahanweyn clans, while Abdullahi (1998) mentions the assimilation of Eyle with Bantu and Rahanweyn communities. The Bantu elders interviewed by the mission consider the Eyle to be a Bantu lineage group (see chapter 6.1). The UNHCR overview classifies the Eyle as a Mirifle clan (see annex 3). Perouse de Montclos (1997) considers the Eile (Eyle) of the Bur Eibi Hills to be a Bantu group.



Lewis (1994a) considers the Eile (Eyle) of Bur Eibe as a Negroid people, living in the area between the two rivers. They cultivate during the rains and hunt in the dry season (with dogs, considered dirty creatures by the 'noble' Somali). Both the Hawiye and the Digil despise them, and there seems good reason to regard them as a pre-Cushistic aboriginal population. They comprise three primary sections, one of which appears to be related to a dynasty of chiefs that ruled the Bur region at some time. Smaller Eile groups are found at Dafet, on the lower and mid-Shabelle, and among the Shidle.65 Mohamed Diriye Abdullahi66 adds that in the 1960s and 1970s the Eyle had some hunting and farming communities in the vicinity of Mount Eyle (Bur Eyle, Bur Eibe), some 60 km south of Baidoa. Their numbers have been constantly in decline since the 1960s due to assimilation with the Rahanweyn and Bantu agricultural communities or through migration to large towns such as Mogadishu where they found employment as butchers. In Mogadishu, before the civil war, the Eyle occupied a large squatter camp beside the grounds of the National University, to the consternation of the university officials who demanded their eviction. The civil war has scattered the few communities that the Eyle had. Abdullahi considers the Eyle an endangered community that would have difficulty in reconstituting its former settlements around the plains of Mount Eyle.
 

yuusufdiin

child of afgooye
You mean Eyl?

Fara Oumari Mohamud informed the delegation that the Eyle were treated as slaves by the main Somali clans. They had no protection from any clan and their relationships with the clans in their home areas (Rahanweyn, Hawadle) were not good. Also for religious reasons, they were treated as outcasts. There are no physical differences between the Eyle and the surrounding Somali clans. There was no intermarriage between the Eyle and the major Somali clans. There were no Eyle in government institutions, and there are no Eyle involved in the Arta peace process at the present time. Eyle could intermarry with some Benadiri and with Tumaal, but not with Yibir. Lewis (1994a) describes the Eyle as clients of the Rahanweyn clans, while Abdullahi (1998) mentions the assimilation of Eyle with Bantu and Rahanweyn communities. The Bantu elders interviewed by the mission consider the Eyle to be a Bantu lineage group (see chapter 6.1). The UNHCR overview classifies the Eyle as a Mirifle clan (see annex 3). Perouse de Montclos (1997) considers the Eile (Eyle) of the Bur Eibi Hills to be a Bantu group.



Lewis (1994a) considers the Eile (Eyle) of Bur Eibe as a Negroid people, living in the area between the two rivers. They cultivate during the rains and hunt in the dry season (with dogs, considered dirty creatures by the 'noble' Somali). Both the Hawiye and the Digil despise them, and there seems good reason to regard them as a pre-Cushistic aboriginal population. They comprise three primary sections, one of which appears to be related to a dynasty of chiefs that ruled the Bur region at some time. Smaller Eile groups are found at Dafet, on the lower and mid-Shabelle, and among the Shidle.65 Mohamed Diriye Abdullahi66 adds that in the 1960s and 1970s the Eyle had some hunting and farming communities in the vicinity of Mount Eyle (Bur Eyle, Bur Eibe), some 60 km south of Baidoa. Their numbers have been constantly in decline since the 1960s due to assimilation with the Rahanweyn and Bantu agricultural communities or through migration to large towns such as Mogadishu where they found employment as butchers. In Mogadishu, before the civil war, the Eyle occupied a large squatter camp beside the grounds of the National University, to the consternation of the university officials who demanded their eviction. The civil war has scattered the few communities that the Eyle had. Abdullahi considers the Eyle an endangered community that would have difficulty in reconstituting its former settlements around the plains of Mount Eyle.
nah im talking about bantu groups like reer shabelle and gosha, interesting information about the eyle i never knew much about them, hope they're still not being treated bad
 

World

VIP
you're mostly right but they speak af maay because they live with us and with the intermarrying its not that much tbh there are full blood somali bantu's part of D&M because we use to own them as slaves back in the day and gave them our last names when we freed them so they joined our tribe that way not by actual lineage, this happened mostly within digil, a few hawiye and dir tribes did the same thing
When the Italians freed them*

:lolbron:
 
You mean Eyl?

Fara Oumari Mohamud informed the delegation that the Eyle were treated as slaves by the main Somali clans. They had no protection from any clan and their relationships with the clans in their home areas (Rahanweyn, Hawadle) were not good. Also for religious reasons, they were treated as outcasts. There are no physical differences between the Eyle and the surrounding Somali clans. There was no intermarriage between the Eyle and the major Somali clans. There were no Eyle in government institutions, and there are no Eyle involved in the Arta peace process at the present time. Eyle could intermarry with some Benadiri and with Tumaal, but not with Yibir. Lewis (1994a) describes the Eyle as clients of the Rahanweyn clans, while Abdullahi (1998) mentions the assimilation of Eyle with Bantu and Rahanweyn communities. The Bantu elders interviewed by the mission consider the Eyle to be a Bantu lineage group (see chapter 6.1). The UNHCR overview classifies the Eyle as a Mirifle clan (see annex 3). Perouse de Montclos (1997) considers the Eile (Eyle) of the Bur Eibi Hills to be a Bantu group.



Lewis (1994a) considers the Eile (Eyle) of Bur Eibe as a Negroid people, living in the area between the two rivers. They cultivate during the rains and hunt in the dry season (with dogs, considered dirty creatures by the 'noble' Somali). Both the Hawiye and the Digil despise them, and there seems good reason to regard them as a pre-Cushistic aboriginal population. They comprise three primary sections, one of which appears to be related to a dynasty of chiefs that ruled the Bur region at some time. Smaller Eile groups are found at Dafet, on the lower and mid-Shabelle, and among the Shidle.65 Mohamed Diriye Abdullahi66 adds that in the 1960s and 1970s the Eyle had some hunting and farming communities in the vicinity of Mount Eyle (Bur Eyle, Bur Eibe), some 60 km south of Baidoa. Their numbers have been constantly in decline since the 1960s due to assimilation with the Rahanweyn and Bantu agricultural communities or through migration to large towns such as Mogadishu where they found employment as butchers. In Mogadishu, before the civil war, the Eyle occupied a large squatter camp beside the grounds of the National University, to the consternation of the university officials who demanded their eviction. The civil war has scattered the few communities that the Eyle had. Abdullahi considers the Eyle an endangered community that would have difficulty in reconstituting its former settlements around the plains of Mount Eyle.
You mean that eyle look like bantu, the ones you're referring to as "surrounding somali clans"?

Anyways atleast its confirmed that eyle & bantus have gone u
You mean Eyl?

Fara Oumari Mohamud informed the delegation that the Eyle were treated as slaves by the main Somali clans. They had no protection from any clan and their relationships with the clans in their home areas (Rahanweyn, Hawadle) were not good. Also for religious reasons, they were treated as outcasts. There are no physical differences between the Eyle and the surrounding Somali clans. There was no intermarriage between the Eyle and the major Somali clans. There were no Eyle in government institutions, and there are no Eyle involved in the Arta peace process at the present time. Eyle could intermarry with some Benadiri and with Tumaal, but not with Yibir. Lewis (1994a) describes the Eyle as clients of the Rahanweyn clans, while Abdullahi (1998) mentions the assimilation of Eyle with Bantu and Rahanweyn communities. The Bantu elders interviewed by the mission consider the Eyle to be a Bantu lineage group (see chapter 6.1). The UNHCR overview classifies the Eyle as a Mirifle clan (see annex 3). Perouse de Montclos (1997) considers the Eile (Eyle) of the Bur Eibi Hills to be a Bantu group.



Lewis (1994a) considers the Eile (Eyle) of Bur Eibe as a Negroid people, living in the area between the two rivers. They cultivate during the rains and hunt in the dry season (with dogs, considered dirty creatures by the 'noble' Somali). Both the Hawiye and the Digil despise them, and there seems good reason to regard them as a pre-Cushistic aboriginal population. They comprise three primary sections, one of which appears to be related to a dynasty of chiefs that ruled the Bur region at some time. Smaller Eile groups are found at Dafet, on the lower and mid-Shabelle, and among the Shidle.65 Mohamed Diriye Abdullahi66 adds that in the 1960s and 1970s the Eyle had some hunting and farming communities in the vicinity of Mount Eyle (Bur Eyle, Bur Eibe), some 60 km south of Baidoa. Their numbers have been constantly in decline since the 1960s due to assimilation with the Rahanweyn and Bantu agricultural communities or through migration to large towns such as Mogadishu where they found employment as butchers. In Mogadishu, before the civil war, the Eyle occupied a large squatter camp beside the grounds of the National University, to the consternation of the university officials who demanded their eviction. The civil war has scattered the few communities that the Eyle had. Abdullahi considers the Eyle an endangered community that would have difficulty in reconstituting its former settlements around the plains of Mount Eyle.
Eyle look like bantus ie "other surrounding somali clans?

Anyways its clear bantus have overpopulated raxanweyn even if they were originally "somali". The idea that there are more somalis in raxanweyn than bantus is funny :siilaanyolaugh:
 
It's closer to Somali than Oromo:farmajoyaab:
The nigga is clearly saying "Sida adiga ku jeclahay adiga ma iijaceshahay" And the raxanweyn intermarried with the Somali bantus so much that the Bantus speak af maay:farmajoyaab:

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So how can people go on claiming raxanweyn is somali? :drakelaugh:

I think i read that the few oromos wanted to make the clan big for protection reasons & included the bantus & arabs
 
Eyle look like bantus ie "other surrounding somali clans?

Anyways its clear bantus have overpopulated raxanweyn even if they were originally "somali". The idea that there are more somalis in raxanweyn than bantus is funny :siilaanyolaugh:

Negative, read the entire paper. There is clear distinction between features of Somali Bantu and rest of Somalis earlier to the description.

The term Madow means "hard (or kinky) hair" and literally denotes hair texture and other physical characteristics such as particular bone structures and facial features, which are negatively valued by Somalis. Gosha are said to be bulkier while so-called "pure" Somalis are said to have longer, more slender fingers. But most significantly according to Besteman, the people who are Madow are considered more "African", as distinct from Somalis, who are considered more "Arabic". In opposition to the term Madow is either the term jileec (or jileyc), meaning "soft" or, more commonly, bilis (which is the opposite of adoon or "slave"). Besteman notes that Oromo descendants are not considered Madow, but this distinction is blurred by the fact that Oromo have intermarried with Madow, the descendants of the slaves.


Meaning of the quoted text was Eyle as small clan with common Somali features and declining population are being absorbed by Bantu and Rahanwayne. Claimed by the former and categorized as the latter.
 

Agent 47

21st Divsion of Somali National Army
So how can people go on claiming raxanweyn is somali? :drakelaugh:

I think i read that the few oromos wanted to make the clan big for protection reasons & included the bantus & arabs
They're Somali, "Claim" kulaha. they don't need approval from anyone:mjohreally:
Only the people who know good Somali would understand maay maay. :obama:
May may is Somali that is spoken faster or something:jaynerd:
And last but not least, a reer waqooyi qowdhan barely understands normal Somali:comeon:
 
They're Somali, "Claim" kulaha. they don't need approval from anyone:mjohreally:
Only the people who know good Somali would understand maay maay. :obama:
May may is Somali that is spoken faster or something:jaynerd:
And last but not least, a reer waqooyi qowdhan barely understands normal Somali:comeon:
"They're somali"

 
I haven't seen any comment on this:

Posted above

"Lewis (1994a) considers the Eile (Eyle) of Bur Eibe as a Negroid people, living in the area between the two rivers. They cultivate during the rains and hunt in the dry season (with dogs, considered dirty creatures by the 'noble' Somali). Both the Hawiye and the Digil despise them, and there seems good reason to regard them as a pre-Cushistic aboriginal population. They comprise three primary sections, one of which appears to be related to a dynasty of chiefs that ruled the Bur region at some time. Smaller Eile groups are found at Dafet, on the lower and mid-Shabelle, and among the Shidle.65 Mohamed Diriye Abdullahi66 adds that in the 1960s and 1970s the Eyle had some hunting and farming communities in the vicinity of Mount Eyle (Bur Eyle, Bur Eibe), some 60 km south of Baidoa. Their numbers have been constantly in decline since the 1960s due to assimilation with the Rahanweyn and Bantu agricultural communities or through migration to large towns such as Mogadishu where they found employment as butchers."

The Eyle are associated with Buur Heybe. The archaeology of Gogoshiis Qabe on Buur Heybe goes back to the Doian period, making them the only known indigenous people in Somalia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buur_Heybe

"Buur Heybe historically served as a key religious and political hub.[2] According to oral tradition in the Doi ("red soil") belt, several dynasties were based in the town.[2][5] The Eyle aver that the area was at various times invaded and occupied by a succession of early Cushitic settlers, the Jidle, Maadanle and Ajuran, whom they each managed to defeat."

Note that the Eyle are Negroid or pre-Cushitic, that they preceded the Samaales in Somalia and that they were there long before the Bantus even came into existence.
 
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