Sudan massacre. Humanity has failed Africa.

by that metric is Qatar "richer" than the US lol
It is.

Now that you mention it the US is one of the only rich countries with a high population. Compare Russia, Nigeria, Indonesia, Ethiopia, China, and India with Denmark, Norway, Qatar, Hong Kong, Sweden, and the Netherlands.
 

Tukraq

VIP
It is.

Now that you mention it the US is one of the only rich countries with a high population. Compare Russia, Nigeria, Indonesia, Ethiopia, China, and India with Denmark, Norway, Qatar, Hong Kong, Sweden, and the Netherlands.
The US is far richer than Qatar lol, also all of the countries with higher populations you named are bigger world factors than the irrelevant puny one you named other than Ethiopia, it’s comical you compared China to Hong Kong lol, this is why gdp per capita isn’t important unless the countries are close nominally other wise you comparing apples to oranges like you are here where your comparing superpowers to tiny irrelevant states in the worlds bigger picture, also the US beats all those Scandinavian countries per capita anyways lol so puny and poorer in every sense
 
The US is far richer than Qatar lol, also all of the countries with higher populations you named are bigger world factors than the irrelevant puny one you named other than Ethiopia, it’s comical you compared China to Hong Kong lol, this is why gdp per capita isn’t important unless the countries are close nominally other wise you comparing apples to oranges like you are here where your comparing superpowers to tiny irrelevant states in the worlds bigger picture, also the US beats all those Scandinavian countries per capita anyways lol so puny and poorer in every sense
If the U.S had the GDP per capita as Qatar, then the total GDP would be higher by relation. GDP per capita explains the living conditions much better, so the total GDP is only useful to explain purchasing power and things of that nature, while per capita is where you should focus if you want to know the wealth of the average person.
 
Can somebody explain what’s really going on in Sudan?
Is it qabil related?
@Yuzra Luuza

No it has nothing to do with qabiil. Here is a simplified version (101) of the crisis in Sudan.

Sudan is in the midst of a political crisis after security forces opened fire on pro-democracy protesters in the capital, Khartoum.

Representatives of the protesters had been in talks with the military over who will take control following the ousting of long-time President Omar al-Bashir.

Negotiations between the two sides have ground to a halt, and the military has scrapped all agreements with the opposition, saying it will hold elections within nine months.

This has angered the protest movement, which had insisted on a transition period of at least three years so it could ensure the elections are free and fair.

Here's what you need to know.

How did it all begin?

The unrest in Sudan can be traced back to December 2018, when President Bashir's government imposed emergency austerity measures in an attempt to stave off economic collapse.

Cuts to bread and fuel subsidies sparked demonstrations in the east over living standards and the anger spread to Khartoum. The protests broadened into demands for the removal of Mr Bashir - who had been in charge for 30 years - and his government.


President Omar al-Bashir was overthrown in a coup in April

The protests reached a climax on 6 April, when demonstrators occupied the square in front of the military's headquarters to demand that the army force the president out.

Five days later, the military announced that the president had been overthrown.

So who is in charge now?
A council of generals assumed power on 11 April but it has struggled to return normality to the country.

The seven-member Transitional Military Council (TMC) is led by Lt-Gen Abdel Fattah Abdelrahman Burhan. The council says it needs to be in charge to ensure order and security.

But the army is not a unified force in Sudan. There are other paramilitary organisations and various Islamist militias that hold some sway.
The military has also faced international condemnation for launching a violent attack on protesters in Khartoum on 3 June which reportedly left at least 30 dead.

The US condemned what it called a "brutal attack" and the UK said the military council bore "full responsibility".

In response, the TMC expressed "sorrow for the way events escalated", saying that the operation had targeted "trouble makers and petty criminals" .

Who are the opposition?

The economic problems brought Sudanese from all walks of life to the streets, but the organisation of demonstrations was taken on by the Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA) - a collaboration of doctors, health workers and lawyers.

The protesters are mostly young, reflecting the country's demographics, but people of all ages have been seen in the crowds.

Women are at the forefront of the demonstrations and a video of a woman who has been named Kandaka, meaning Nubian queen, leading the chants has gone viral.

When the military took power in April, demonstrators stayed put outside its headquarters and insisted that it transfer authority to a civilian administration.

Talks between the ruling generals and the protest organisers, who have come together under the umbrella group Alliance for Freedom and Change, initially showed little sign of progress, but they eventually came to an agreement.

What did the two sides agree?
The military and protesters agreed on 15 May to a three-year transition period to civilian rule.

Demonstrators argue that Mr Bashir's regime is so deeply entrenched that a long transition is needed to dismantle his political network and allow fair elections.

The two sides also agreed on the structure of a new government - including a sovereign council, a cabinet and a legislative body.

But the military leaders scrapped all of these agreements on 3 June and said fresh elections would be held within nine months.

The TMC's head said they had decided to "stop negotiating with the Alliance for Freedom and Change and cancel what had been agreed on".

Former British ambassador to Sudan, Rosalind Marsden, told the BBC that the snap election would "simply pave the way for much of the old regime to come back into power".

The announcement came shortly after the violent crackdown on protesters in Khartoum.

In the wake of killings, the leaders of the pro-democracy movement said they were cutting all contact with the TMC and called for "total civil disobedience" and a general strike.

What has the international response been?

Most African and western countries have backed the protesters but Saudi Arabia and UAE, who have generally supported the TMC, have urged the two sides to engage in discussions.

The African Union (AU) has suspended Sudan from its membership until a civilian led transitional authority is established.

The UN are removing all non-essential staff from Sudan but China and Russia have blocked moves to impose sanctions.

The US National Security Advisor, John Bolton, condemned the Khartoum violence, calling it "abhorrent".

But the BBC Africa editor Fergal Keane said this will only mean something if the US demands that its regional allies - Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates - exert pressure on the Sudanese military.


BBC
 

Genesisx72

living off borrowed time
The US is far richer than Qatar lol, also all of the countries with higher populations you named are bigger world factors than the irrelevant puny one you named other than Ethiopia, it’s comical you compared China to Hong Kong lol, this is why gdp per capita isn’t important unless the countries are close nominally other wise you comparing apples to oranges like you are here where your comparing superpowers to tiny irrelevant states in the worlds bigger picture, also the US beats all those Scandinavian countries per capita anyways lol so puny and poorer in every sense
You lack a basic grasp on economics, you should read up on it more sxb
 

wawenka

Guul Ama Geeri
yes their opinion counts just as much as mine as the point of the government is to represent the people, for example you view crackheads and prostituites negatively but thats just your opinion as many see them in a positive light, this is why the government should be representative of the whole population and not just a single person or a small group
we muslims dont ask the whole population about thier opinion,Only affluent People gets asked about thier opinion some elders the scholars and so on , you guys gameplan is messed up
 
At least they are dedicated with their agenda and that takes a special kind of IQ.

Despite not being recognized. They've been relatively peaceful and stable for 30 years compared to southern Somalia that never moved on from chaos and barely have any central authority to govern their regions.

You cannot deny our differences. The best thing for you guys is to learn from us instead of dragging us with your dirt when we don't face the same problems.

I guess being delusional can make a difference.
 

Tukraq

VIP
If the U.S had the GDP per capita as Qatar, then the total GDP would be higher by relation. GDP per capita explains the living conditions much better, so the total GDP is only useful to explain purchasing power and things of that nature, while per capita is where you should focus if you want to know the wealth of the average person.
That argument wasn’t about the average person but the wealth of the nations
 

Tukraq

VIP
we muslims dont ask the whole population about thier opinion,Only affluent People gets asked about thier opinion some elders the scholars and so on , you guys gameplan is messed up
What do you mean by we Muslims, their are democratic Muslim nations, and it’s not like Islam gave us a certain way to elect leaders lol, Islam is compatible with democracy
 
@Yuzra Luuza

No it has nothing to do with qabiil. Here is a simplified version (101) of the crisis in Sudan.

Sudan is in the midst of a political crisis after security forces opened fire on pro-democracy protesters in the capital, Khartoum.

Representatives of the protesters had been in talks with the military over who will take control following the ousting of long-time President Omar al-Bashir.

Negotiations between the two sides have ground to a halt, and the military has scrapped all agreements with the opposition, saying it will hold elections within nine months.

This has angered the protest movement, which had insisted on a transition period of at least three years so it could ensure the elections are free and fair.

Here's what you need to know.

How did it all begin?

The unrest in Sudan can be traced back to December 2018, when President Bashir's government imposed emergency austerity measures in an attempt to stave off economic collapse.

Cuts to bread and fuel subsidies sparked demonstrations in the east over living standards and the anger spread to Khartoum. The protests broadened into demands for the removal of Mr Bashir - who had been in charge for 30 years - and his government.


President Omar al-Bashir was overthrown in a coup in April

The protests reached a climax on 6 April, when demonstrators occupied the square in front of the military's headquarters to demand that the army force the president out.

Five days later, the military announced that the president had been overthrown.

So who is in charge now?
A council of generals assumed power on 11 April but it has struggled to return normality to the country.

The seven-member Transitional Military Council (TMC) is led by Lt-Gen Abdel Fattah Abdelrahman Burhan. The council says it needs to be in charge to ensure order and security.

But the army is not a unified force in Sudan. There are other paramilitary organisations and various Islamist militias that hold some sway.
The military has also faced international condemnation for launching a violent attack on protesters in Khartoum on 3 June which reportedly left at least 30 dead.

The US condemned what it called a "brutal attack" and the UK said the military council bore "full responsibility".

In response, the TMC expressed "sorrow for the way events escalated", saying that the operation had targeted "trouble makers and petty criminals" .

Who are the opposition?

The economic problems brought Sudanese from all walks of life to the streets, but the organisation of demonstrations was taken on by the Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA) - a collaboration of doctors, health workers and lawyers.

The protesters are mostly young, reflecting the country's demographics, but people of all ages have been seen in the crowds.

Women are at the forefront of the demonstrations and a video of a woman who has been named Kandaka, meaning Nubian queen, leading the chants has gone viral.

When the military took power in April, demonstrators stayed put outside its headquarters and insisted that it transfer authority to a civilian administration.

Talks between the ruling generals and the protest organisers, who have come together under the umbrella group Alliance for Freedom and Change, initially showed little sign of progress, but they eventually came to an agreement.

What did the two sides agree?
The military and protesters agreed on 15 May to a three-year transition period to civilian rule.

Demonstrators argue that Mr Bashir's regime is so deeply entrenched that a long transition is needed to dismantle his political network and allow fair elections.

The two sides also agreed on the structure of a new government - including a sovereign council, a cabinet and a legislative body.

But the military leaders scrapped all of these agreements on 3 June and said fresh elections would be held within nine months.

The TMC's head said they had decided to "stop negotiating with the Alliance for Freedom and Change and cancel what had been agreed on".

Former British ambassador to Sudan, Rosalind Marsden, told the BBC that the snap election would "simply pave the way for much of the old regime to come back into power".

The announcement came shortly after the violent crackdown on protesters in Khartoum.

In the wake of killings, the leaders of the pro-democracy movement said they were cutting all contact with the TMC and called for "total civil disobedience" and a general strike.

What has the international response been?

Most African and western countries have backed the protesters but Saudi Arabia and UAE, who have generally supported the TMC, have urged the two sides to engage in discussions.

The African Union (AU) has suspended Sudan from its membership until a civilian led transitional authority is established.

The UN are removing all non-essential staff from Sudan but China and Russia have blocked moves to impose sanctions.

The US National Security Advisor, John Bolton, condemned the Khartoum violence, calling it "abhorrent".

But the BBC Africa editor Fergal Keane said this will only mean something if the US demands that its regional allies - Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates - exert pressure on the Sudanese military.


BBC
Good summary, wish I could thumbs up. Finally someone with logic not trolling or fake crying over old/false news.

However, tribe/ethnicity sort of has to do with it as Himedti claims he wanted to seek revenge on the people of Khartoum (and surrounding region) as he feels they believe they're superior to his people as they're wealthier and more education.

Anyways, @Yusra Luuza to be exact nothing serious is happening in Sudan right now. The civil disobedience ended and people are going back to work, OP is late as f*ck.


3 days ago during the disobedience...
 
It is impressive, but compared to Egypt's, it's small.


Each stone btw weighs 2.5 tons, or 2268 kg. Look how small the woman on the bottom is for perspective.

In depends on the Sudanese pyramids most pyramids were smaller than Egyptian counter parts but only a few were comparable to the step pyramid size wise











Most of the big pyramids are ruined or degraded.
 

land owner

Welcome to the yaab zone
VIP
I personally feel bad for all the innocent people being raped and killed and send my condolences but I barely saw any Sudanese people show any support for somalia during the huge 2011 drought that claimed the lives of 260,000 Somalis, I’m not telling any of you guys not to show any solidarity but I’m seeing far too many Somalis spreading awareness and even donating to sudan compared to the Sudanese I’ve ever seen mention somalia during our hardships.
 

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