Somalia before Wahabissm

AIOPZ

Pan-Islamist
Thank you very much, women also used to pray in the same mosque as a the male sahabah and would even ask questions infront of men. There were actually no barriers or walls between men and women back when Prophet SAW was alive.

Tell Wahabists this and theyll go bonkers giving you excuses like the time has changed fitnah has spread etc. So they are flexible when it suits them, adhering to a bedoin Saudi culture instead of the pure Islam
Still, women were to pray behind the men and it wasn't halal for them to pray in the same line. Also, if men’s clothes were not long enough, the women were ordered not to raise their heads from sujood until men raised their heads first. Keep in mind temptations and distractions are the last things needed in prayers. Some women also breastfeed their children during prayer periods and having no men around makes them feel more at ease.
 
Veiling was a preislamic norm that attoned high status

Another and the most common meaning of Hijab today is the veil worn by women.

Along with scriptural arguments, scholars argue that a head covering should not be compulsory in Islam because the veil predates the revelation of the Qur’an. Head-covering was introduced into Arabia long before advent of Islam, primarily through contacts with countries, where the hijab was a sign of social status.

The veil was apparently in use in Sassanian society, and segregation of the sexes and use of the veil were heavily in evidence in the Christian Middle East and Mediterranean regions at the time of the rise of Islam. During Mohammad’s lifetime and only toward the end of that time, his wives were the only Muslim women required to veil. After his death and following the Muslim conquest of the adjoining territories, where upper-class women veiled, the veil became a common place item of clothing for upper class. Veiling was apparently not introduced into Arabia by Muhammad but already existed. Veiling was connected with social status, as it was used among Greeks, Romans, Jews, and Assyrians, all of whom practiced veiling to some degree. It is nowhere explicitly prescribed in the Qur'an; the only verses dealing with women’s clothing, aside from those already quoted, instruct women to guard their private parts and throw a scarf over their bosoms (Sura 24:31-32). Throughout Mohammmad’s lifetime veiling, was observed only by his wives. Moreover, that the phrase “[she] took the veil” is used in the hadith to mean that a woman became a wife of Mohammad. It is not known how the customs spread to the rest of the community. The Muslim conquest of areas in which veiling was commonplace among the upper classes, the influx of wealth, the resultant raised status of Arabs, and Mohammad’s wives being taken as models probably combined to bring about their general adoption.” 4

The term chador, which is the form of veiling most used in Iran today, means a tent, and has its roots in the pre-Islamic practice of ferrying wealthy women around in covered sedan chairs.5

John Esposito, professor of Islamic Studies at Georgetown University, writes that the customs of veiling and seclusion of women in early Islam were assimilated from the conquered Persian and Byzantine societies and then later on they were viewed as appropriate expressions of Qur'anic norms and values. The Qur'an does not stipulate veiling or seclusion; on the contrary, it tends to emphasize the participation and religious responsibility of both men and women in society.6

Sheikh Muhammad al-Ghazali in his book Sunna Between Fiqh and Hadith declares that all traditions that function to keep women ignorant and prevent them from functioning in public are the remnants ofjahiliya and that following them is contrary to the spirit of Islam. Al-Ghazali says that during the time of the Prophet women were equals at home, in the mosques and on the battlefield. Today true Islam is being destroyed in the name of Islam.7
In Islam ruh al-madaniyya (Islam: the Spirit of Civilization) Shaykh Mustafa Ghalayini reminds his readers that veiling pre-dated Islam and that Muslims learned from other peoples with whom they mixed.8

Nazira Zin al-Din points out that veiling was a custom of rich families as a symbol of status. She quotes Shaykh Abdul Qadir al-Maghribi who also saw in hijab an aristocratic habit to distinguish the women of rich and prestigious families from other women. Nazira concludes that hijab as it is known today is prohibited by the Islamic shari'a.9

Another Muslim scholar, Abd al-Halim Abu Shiqa, wrote a scholarly study of women in Islam entitledTahrir al-mara'a fi 'asr al-risalah: (The Emancipation of Women during the Time of the Prophet)10. He agrees with Zin al-Din and al-Ghazali about the discrepancy between the status of women during the time of the Prophet Mohammad and the status of women today.




Thank you!!!
 
Still, women were to pray behind the men and it wasn't halal for them to pray in the same line. Also, if men’s clothes were not long enough, the women were ordered not to raise their heads from sujood until men raised their heads first. Keep in mind temptations and distractions are the last things needed in prayers. Some women also breastfeed their children during prayer periods and having no men around makes them feel more at ease.

"Temptation" again? Why do you insist on demeaning men like this?


No wonder men in certain societies get turned on by the sight of a bare ankle.

The entire female form and existence has been perverted.
 

Samaalic Era

QurboExit
One of Imam Shafi's teachers was also a woman - Sayyida Nafisa
Umar appointed a woman as leader of the market place - Al Shifa
A warrior who fought along side her brother - Khawla Bint Al Azwar

Extremism is never good. Moderation is encouraged in the deen.
Would you send your own daughter to go fight on the frontlines?:stopit:

What your advocating for is western ideology which is self destructive
 
Would you send your own daughter to go fight on the frontlines?:stopit:

What your advocating for is western ideology which is self destructive

LOOOOL

Are you joking?

ISLAM gave women human rights not the West.

Those ladies existed and thrived during the purest period of Islam.
 
Would you send your own daughter to go fight on the frontlines?:stopit:

What your advocating for is western ideology which is self destructive
Stop trolling. Khawlah had nothing to do with western ideology. Aisha also led an army although she was on the wrong side and Ali was correct.
 
Still, women were to pray behind the men and it wasn't halal for them to pray in the same line. Also, if men’s clothes were not long enough, the women were ordered not to raise their heads from sujood until men raised their heads first. Keep in mind temptations and distractions are the last things needed in prayers. Some women also breastfeed their children during prayer periods and having no men around makes them feel more at ease.
But but but excuses excuses!

So you Wahabis pick and choose what to follow? You always declare things to be bid'ah except when it goes against your core beliefs?

Is it not bid"ah to follow a practice which the Prophet SAW deemed unnecessary (I.e seperate room for women?!?)
 

Samaalic Era

QurboExit
LOOOOL

Are you joking?

ISLAM gave women human rights not the West.

Those ladies existed and thrived during the purest period of Islam.
Islamic core principles are the same from the time Adam till now.

Believing hijab is not wajib and free-mixing is normal is akin to animalistic behaviour.

Civilised people cover themselves and live by Divine Law of Allah swt.:camby:
 
Would you send your own daughter to go fight on the frontlines?:stopit:

What your advocating for is western ideology which is self destructive
There were many Sahaba women who did JUST that and fought against enemies of Islam. Despite her male colleagues suggesting against it, the Prophet did not prevent her from joining the battle!

This speaks volumes and is the hidden history Wahabites love to conceal
 

Samaalic Era

QurboExit
There were many Sahaba women who did JUST that and fought against enemies of Islam. Despite her male colleagues suggesting against it, the Prophet did not prevent her from joining the battle!

This speaks volumes and is the hidden history Wahabites love to conceal
Im not a Wahabi for your information. Also Khawlah almost got raped in the Battle of Yarmouk and she snuck onto the battlefield which is completely stupid.

You are a dayooth with no honor if your gonna send your women to fight and risk getting raped.All dayooths should be banned from having children :pacspit:
 

Samaalic Era

QurboExit
Stop trolling. Khawlah had nothing to do with western ideology. Aisha also led an army although she was on the wrong side and Ali was correct.
Aisha should have never gone out in the first place. That led to a massive loss of life
 

AIOPZ

Pan-Islamist
@TekNiKo

There are two meanings of hijab. There is a classical usage and modern usage of the term. In the classical usage, the word hijab means barrier, partition, or curtain to cause separation (Qabeelat Hosna 2009, 53). The word hijab comes up seven times in the Qur’an and implies this meaning. For example, Allah Says in the Qur’an [meaning of which is]:

“And it is not for any human being that Allah should speak to him except by revelation or from behind a hijab [partition] or that He sends a messenger to reveal, by His permission, what He wills” [Qur’an 42:51].

Similarly, Allah Says regarding the people of paradise and the people of hellfire on the Day of Judgement [meaning of which is]:

“And between them will be a hijab [partition]” [Qur’an 7:46]

According to Dr. Yasir Qadhi, “This classical usage was restricted to the wives of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)” (Qabeelat Hosna 2009, 53). This form of hijab is only mentioned in reference to the wives of the Prophet (pbuh). The other verses speaking about Muslim women covering in general do not mention the word hijab.

Hence, this is why Allah says in Surah Ahzab regarding the wives of the Prophet (pbuh) [meaning of which is]:

“And when you ask [his wives] for something, ask them from behind a hijab” [Qur’an 33:53].

In this verse, it literally means a curtain. The wives of the Prophet (pbuh) had to speak from behind a physical curtain. Their level of hijab was a degree higher than that required by other Muslim women. This is why in the Battle of the Camel, Aisha was in a tent on the camel and was not seen.

In modern usage, the word hijab means headscarf. It seems there is some confusion today in which some people came to believe that since hijab in the Qur’an is only in reference to the Prophet’s wives, it is not mandatory for the rest of the Muslim women but was restricted to the Prophet’s wives. This is because they erroneously think that hijab in the Qur’an in reference to the Prophet’s wives carries the same meaning as it does today [i.e. headscarf]. However, this is a mistake because the type of hijabmentioned for the Prophet’s wives was a literal curtain as mentioned above and in no way referring to the headscarf.

Allah Says in the Qur’an [meaning of which is]:

“And tell the believing women to reduce [some] of their vision and guard their private parts and not expose their adornment except that which [necessarily] appears thereof and to wrap [a portion of] their khumur [headscarves] over their chests and not expose their adornment except to their husbands, their fathers, their husbands’ fathers, their sons, their husbands’ sons, their brothers, their brothers’ sons, their sisters’ sons, their women, that which their right hands possess, or those male attendants having no physical desire, or children who are not yet aware of the private aspects of women.” [Qur’an 24:31].

One of the meanings of khimar that was popularly understood during the Prophet’s (pbuh) time was a turban. In other words, men used to refer to their turbans as khimar because they cover their heads. For example, it is well known in Islamic law that during the act of purification (wudu), it is permissible to wipe over your socks and turban. In the following hadith, one of the companions defines this action of the Prophet (pbuh) by describing his turban using the word khimar, “I saw the Messenger of Allah (pbuh) wiping over the khimar [turban] and leather socks” (An-Nasa’i 2007). Another hadith says, “The Messenger of Allah wiped over his leather socks and his khimar [turban]” (Ibn Majah 2007).

“Also a man’s turban; because a man covers his head with it in like manner as a woman covers her head with her khimar when he disposes it in the Arab manner, he turns [a part of] it under the jaws [nearly in the same manner in which a woman disposes her khimar]” (Lane 1863, 809).

Therefore, all of the above shows that the word khimar used in the verse mentioned above is referring to a woman’s headscarf. In other words, Allah is saying in this verse to tell the women to take a portion of their khimar and use it to cover the upper chest area [neck, chest, bosom] in addition to their heads and ears. Aisha said, “When [the verse]: ‘They should draw their khimar over their chests’ was revealed, (the ladies) cut their waist sheets [worn as a lower garment] at the edges and covered [themselves] with it” (Bukhari 1997). Ibn Hajar said in Fath Al-Bari, the most authoritative text in mainstream Islam explaining the hadiths compiled by Al-Bukhari:

“Meaning of ‘they covered’ is that they [the women] covered their faces. The description of this is that the woman places the khimar [headscarf] over her head and then throws the right side of it over her left shoulder so that it [all completely] covers. Al-Faraa’ said: ‘In the pre-Islamic days, the women used to let hang down their khimar behind their backs and reveal that which is in the front [neck, chest, bosom], so they were commanded to conceal [their frontal area]. The khimar for the woman is like the turban for the man’” (Hajar 1986).

In addition, there are a number of hadiths in which the word khimar is mentioned in a way that proves that women used to wear headscarves outside their homes because they understood it to be obligatory. For example, Aisha reported an incident which took place with her brother:

“He seated me behind him on his camel. I lifted my khimar [from my head] and took it off from my neck. He struck my foot as if he was striking the camel. I said to him: Do you see anyone [else here]?” (Muslim 2007).

Further, it is reported in another hadith that, “Umm Sulaim went out wrapping her khimar hurriedly until she met Allah’s Messenger” (Muslim 2007). She was not one of his wives yet when she left her house, she quickly put on her khimar to go and meet with Allah’s Messenger (pbuh). Similarly, when the mother of Abu Hurairah accepted Islam, it is reported that when he knocked on the door, “she took a bath and put on her shirt and quickly [put on] her khimar and [then] opened the door” (Muslim 2007). She opened the door only after putting on her headscarf. Thus, all of the above shows that women used to consider their headscarves (khimar) as mandatory.

Critics of the khimar argue that it was just a cultural practice among Arab women during the time of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) and is not intended for all times and places. Regarding the previously mentioned verse on khimar, they say that the “verse…instructs how to wear an existing traditional garment. It doesn’t impose a new one” (Nomani & Arafa 2015). They also claim that covering of the head during that time was a common practice among people of many faiths and cultures, thus, it has nothing to do with religiosity.

While it is true that women did traditionally cover their heads as pointed out earlier, they were still instructed to wear it in a specific manner which was outside of their tradition. They used to throw it behind their backs without covering the front so Allah commanded them to bring a portion of it to the front to cover themselves. Further, Allah is very clear in the verse as to which males can a woman display her charms in front of. This is again outside of their tradition. It is imposing a new way to cover their chests in addition to their heads. This is why Aisha was so surprised to find the women from the Ansar abiding by the new command so quickly.
 

Attachments

AIOPZ

Pan-Islamist
@TekNiKo Part 2:

Secondly, even if it was a cultural tradition among people of many faiths and cultures, Allah can take a cultural tradition and make it part of sacred law to be imposed on the believers for the rest of time. As Muslims, we believe that all of Allah’s laws are full of goodness and wisdom whether we comprehend it or not. If Allah takes a particular part of Arab culture and makes it part of Islamic law, then this is acceptable. We have instances of this in our religion. For example, before Islam the practice of zihaarwas part of Arab culture. This was a pre-Islamic form of divorce in which the husband says to his wife, “You are to me like my mother’s back.” After the coming of Islam, this practice continued and became part of Islamic law where a man is required to give expiation to release himself from it. Allah explicitly refers to it in the Qur’an:

“And those who pronounce zihaar from their wives and then [wish to] go back on what they said – then [there must be] the freeing of a slave before they touch one another. That is what you are admonished thereby; and Allah is Acquainted with what you do” [Qur’an 58:3].

Similarly, in the Sunnah, it is narrated that a man came to the Prophet (pbuh) who had declared zihaarfrom his wife, then he had intercourse with her. He said to the Prophet (pbuh):

“O Messenger of Allah, I declared zihaar on my wife, then I had intercourse with her before I offered the expiation.” He (pbuh) said: “What made you do that, may Allah have mercy on you?” He said: “I saw her anklets in the light of the moon.” Prophet (pbuh) said: “Do not approach her [again] until you have done that which Allah, the Mighty and Sublime, has commanded” (An-Nasa’i 2007).

Other pre-Islamic cultural practices which were adopted into Islam include fasting on the Day of ‘Ashura [10th of Muharram], the talbiyyah for hajj and ‘umrah with slight modification, sacredness of the four holy months, etc. Therefore, Islam adopted some practices which were common in the Arab culture and made them permanently part of sacred law. Anything that is explicitly mentioned in the Qur’an and Sunnah as a command cannot be explained away by just stating that it was culture.

The Arabs had their own cultural styles of clothing from which the Qur’an commanded them to differ. Therefore, a new stipulation came from Allah mandating them to differentiate themselves from their culture and dress appropriately as ordained in the Divine command. This Divine command will remain valid until the end of time.

Source: https://thethinkingmuslim.com/2015/...omans-headscarf-khimar-outer-garment-jilbaab/

View attachment 71208

^ Also some more evidence against your claim that the veil was restricted to the Prophet's wives (RA).
 

Samaalic Era

QurboExit
The kufar and their allies Munafiqeen have to make this kind of thread every year on sspot.
View attachment 71204
This is what women used to wear in Somalia, but you'll never see the enemies of Islam advocating for this what they want is women to be naked and the men to be dayooth aka cucks. Ilaahay baanu ka magan galnay.
Thats the end goal they want for us sxb. May Allah swt guide us:faysalwtf:
 

AIOPZ

Pan-Islamist
As long as a woman and MAN meets the hijab/covering criteria, they can be around each other.

Stop adding things to the religion.
What am I adding to the religion? This is common knowledge, sxb.

Ask yourself, are you mad at me or are you mad at the diin for demanding men to be protective over their women?
 
Im not a Wahabi for your information. Also Khawlah almost got raped in the Battle of Yarmouk and she snuck onto the battlefield which is completely stupid.

You are a dayooth with no honor if your gonna send your women to fight and risk getting raped.All dayooths should be banned from having children :pacspit:
Interesting how you omitted the part of the heroine's story.

In another battle, Khawlah was captured after falling from her horse. After being taken to a camp with other women prisoners, Khawlah was to be taken to the leader's tent as he intended to rape her. Instead, Khawlah roused the other prisoners, who used the tent poles as weapons and attacked the Byzantine guards. According to Al Waqidi,[2] they managed to kill thirty Byzantine knights with Khawlah taking credit for five, including the Byzantine who insulted her.
@PuntiteQueen You see what these wahabists always do omitting scripture? This brave women actually devised and ingenious plan not only defending herself but overwhelming the enemy empowering other women prisoners as well. What a heroine!

Thanks for teaching me this I respect her more now, whilst @Samaalic Era tried to belittle her
 
Aisha should have never gone out in the first place. That led to a massive loss of life
Aisha and the Sahabas with her were wrong but their intentions were in the right place which was to go after Uthmans killers.

Anyways, the buttom line is you don't have to do all these things with your own but this element of force and seeing things one way and not respecting differences of opinion should stop. Our Prophet pbuh told us to be moderate which is the best way.
 
Ascribing orthodox practices to "Wahabism" shows a lack of sincerity on the OPs part. He parrots the orientalist myth of a spiritual "sufi islam" divorced of the ahkam the religion came with. :abuxyga:

Fact is Somalis did not practice many religious tenents properly including hijab because of ignorance not because it was a legitimate experession of the diin. In fact, whole clans didnt even know how to pray as explorers of the 19th century have attested to
 
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@TekNiKo Part 2:

Secondly, even if it was a cultural tradition among people of many faiths and cultures, Allah can take a cultural tradition and make it part of sacred law to be imposed on the believers for the rest of time. As Muslims, we believe that all of Allah’s laws are full of goodness and wisdom whether we comprehend it or not. If Allah takes a particular part of Arab culture and makes it part of Islamic law, then this is acceptable. We have instances of this in our religion. For example, before Islam the practice of zihaarwas part of Arab culture. This was a pre-Islamic form of divorce in which the husband says to his wife, “You are to me like my mother’s back.” After the coming of Islam, this practice continued and became part of Islamic law where a man is required to give expiation to release himself from it. Allah explicitly refers to it in the Qur’an:

“And those who pronounce zihaar from their wives and then [wish to] go back on what they said – then [there must be] the freeing of a slave before they touch one another. That is what you are admonished thereby; and Allah is Acquainted with what you do” [Qur’an 58:3].

Similarly, in the Sunnah, it is narrated that a man came to the Prophet (pbuh) who had declared zihaarfrom his wife, then he had intercourse with her. He said to the Prophet (pbuh):

“O Messenger of Allah, I declared zihaar on my wife, then I had intercourse with her before I offered the expiation.” He (pbuh) said: “What made you do that, may Allah have mercy on you?” He said: “I saw her anklets in the light of the moon.” Prophet (pbuh) said: “Do not approach her [again] until you have done that which Allah, the Mighty and Sublime, has commanded” (An-Nasa’i 2007).

Other pre-Islamic cultural practices which were adopted into Islam include fasting on the Day of ‘Ashura [10th of Muharram], the talbiyyah for hajj and ‘umrah with slight modification, sacredness of the four holy months, etc. Therefore, Islam adopted some practices which were common in the Arab culture and made them permanently part of sacred law. Anything that is explicitly mentioned in the Qur’an and Sunnah as a command cannot be explained away by just stating that it was culture.

The Arabs had their own cultural styles of clothing from which the Qur’an commanded them to differ. Therefore, a new stipulation came from Allah mandating them to differentiate themselves from their culture and dress appropriately as ordained in the Divine command. This Divine command will remain valid until the end of time.

Source: https://thethinkingmuslim.com/2015/...omans-headscarf-khimar-outer-garment-jilbaab/

View attachment 71208

^ Also some more evidence against your claim that the veil was restricted to the Prophet's wives (RA).
Im not gonna read your long essays copied from Salafist Al Maghreb institute, Yasir Qadhi is not my authoritative source.

Name one sahabiyad other than the Prophets wives that wore niqab. Exactly there is none, they were be specially raised in rank and honour due to being Holy Prophets spouses.
 

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