Official Podcast Thread

Do u work for the bbc? I listen to Islamic lectures but now that I think of it, dabacasar would make good podcasts too.
 
We have no access to BBC programming in America. Despite that I ended up following the BBC HORIZON Jim Khalili series on Many topics.


- BBC -Atom series, three episodes that exclusively deal with the history of the Atom and how discoveries related too all things Physics/Chemistry in light of the Atom were made.
- BBC - Electricity by Jim Khalili
- BBC - Science in Islam By Jim Khalili
- BBC - Chemistry by Jim khalili

Then I ended up watching BBC Horizon "Light Fantastic" - Let there be light series that dealt with History of Optics and Light from Greeks -Islam -European in that order.


BBC is worth paying for compared to American Garbage news cycle and tv programming mostly geared for who fucked who and who is fatter and richer.
 
Last edited:
This guy Khalili is my unofficial professor of Physics, I watched almost all of his BBC episodes. I learned so much more from this guy than I ever learned from a class I paid at the U. That is why I have tons of physics books even though I am not a physics major.



The books on my desk inspired by bbc science programming. Just took the pic :).


 
Last edited:
Check out Mike Duncan's Revolution podcast. http://www.revolutionspodcast.com/





He also created the legendary 'History of Rome'. Which pretty much influenced other historical podcasters.


Legend himself




Once you finished 'History of Rome' podcast, check out 'History of Byzantium', the spiritual successor by a different podcaster.


https://thehistoryofbyzantium.com/ -


I also enjoy listening to 'History of England' podcast


https://thehistoryofengland.co.uk/


Something to last for the summer and beyond . Thanks for the links.
 
Simple question I'd say.

Personally, the crown has to go to the rather unbiased In Our Time BBC podcast series as it covers a wide range of topics/sub-topics ranging from philosophy and history to science and religion.

Here are my personal highlights:


The glorious revolution:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00547fk

This so-called revolution took place near the end of the 17th century as parliament wanted to depose the 'tyrannical' and Catholic king James II by inviting a protestant foreign lord and his army. (Dutch William of orange)

As the name suggests, this was a 'bloodless' revolution in much of England and Scotland hence the "glorious" part in the title but that isn't the case in largely Catholic Ireland where it took a shocking and bloody path.

Furthermore, this revolution was a major influence in accelerating the protestant acendncy (economic, political and social wholesale domination of Ireland by minority protestants) which adversely affected Ireland and Northern Ireland to this day (see Irish troubles via Google/wiki)

(Im not bothered to write a synopsis for the other two highlights so I'll just copy pasta:()


The Great Reform Act: (good follow up to The Glorious Revolution)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00flwh9

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Great Reform Act of 1832. The Act redrew the map of British politics in the wake of the Industrial Revolution and is a landmark in British political history.“We must get the suffrage, we must get votes, that we may send the men to Parliament who will do our work for us; …and we must have the country divided so that the little kings of the counties can't do as they like, but must be shaken up in one bag with us.”


The Peasants Revolt:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0038x8s

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. “When Adam delved and Eve span, who was then the Gentleman?" these are the opening words of a rousing sermon, said to be by John Ball, which fires a broadside at the deeply hierarchical nature of fourteenth century England. Ball, along with Wat Tyler, was one of the principal leaders of the Peasants’ Revolt – his sermon ends: "I exhort you to consider that now the time is come, appointed to us by God, in which ye may (if ye will) cast off the yoke of bondage, and recover liberty". The subsequent events of June 1381 represent a pivotal and thrilling moment in England’s history, characterised by murder and mayhem, beheadings and betrayal, a boy-King and his absent uncle, and a general riot of destruction and death.


By the way, this isn't a western/euro-centric series as it covers a lot of points in the wider east as well. Here's a recent podcast about maths in the early Islamic world.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08dr5qt

I just listened to Maths in the Early Islamic World podcast. Thanks again.
 

John Michael

Free my girl Jodi!
VIP
my favorite murder
Guys we fucked :ftw9nwa:
revisionist history
This American life


Oprah's coming out with a podcast of interviews and what not so I'm excited. :lawd:
 
Is that the one about criminals and their prosecution?
Yeah. An attorney ordered a new trial for the guy now that his story is public because many don't think he's guilty & there were a few issues during his trial (basically his attorney was shit).
 
Yeah. An attorney ordered a new trial for the guy now that his story is public because many don't think he's guilty & there were a few issues during his trial (basically his attorney was shit).
Do you listen to any others walaal?
 
my favorite murder
Guys we fucked :ftw9nwa:
revisionist history
This American life


Oprah's coming out with a podcast of interviews and what not so I'm excited. :lawd:
I miss Oprah :noneck: my hooyo and I would fight because she wanted to watch her while I wanted Arthur. I only started liking it after it went off air :mjcry:
 

Trending

Top