Northern guy visits Mogadishu

marqaanmontana

marqaaan city
not really khat worship focuses on chewing only no killing no covering bodys just sip your shax smoke your malboro and chew it takes away alot of anger and stress from the youths therfore making them focus on natural things like sex instead of lets bomb the local mall
 
How is Puntland South when it's the most northern part of Somalia i reiterate the colonialist are gone:comeon:

Colonel history was a driving factor in shaping the northern identity. Culture wise you are closer to the south, hear out you Harti brothers.


The clan boundaries between Harti and Isaaq that were so often stressed by Dhulbahante and Warsangeli who supported Puntland are in fact extremely porous. There are strong cultural and social connections between Isaaq, Warsangeli and Dhulbahante. Some of these cross-cutting ties originate from colonial times.


Members of all descent groups in the north-west studied in British schools together and they served together as clerks, soldiers or policemen under the British administration. They were socialized in the ‘British system’, which, according to many of my older interview partners, was distinct from the ‘Italian system’, which the Majeerteen and the other ‘southerners’ internalised. The difference between both ‘systems’ was, according to many Isaaq and also Dhulbahante and Warsangeli, that the British system respected Somali traditions, whereas the Italian system was more intrusive and repressive, particularly under the fascists. One effect was, according to Garaad Cabdiqani, that ‘the elders of the northern regions were more effective than the elders of the southern regions’ (interview with Garaad Cabdiqani,Laascaanood, 06.11.2003).


Garaad Cabdiqani, who in the early 2000s was in conflict with Cabdullahi Yuusuf, maintained that, genealogically, Dhulbahante and Majeerteen are brothers. But culturally and regarding their colonial history, ‘the Majeerteen belong to the south’ (interview with Garaad Cabdiqani, Laascaanood, 06.11 .2003).


Cabdullahi Jalac, a Warsangeli and the commander of the Somaliland police forces in Ceelbuuh in 2004, argued: ‘British were gob [good people]; Italians were gun [bad/‘second class’ people]. I am British.’
 
Colonel history was a driving factor in shaping the northern identity. Culture wise you are closer to the south, hear out you Harti brothers.


The clan boundaries between Harti and Isaaq that were so often stressed by Dhulbahante and Warsangeli who supported Puntland are in fact extremely porous. There are strong cultural and social connections between Isaaq, Warsangeli and Dhulbahante. Some of these cross-cutting ties originate from colonial times.


Members of all descent groups in the north-west studied in British schools together and they served together as clerks, soldiers or policemen under the British administration. They were socialized in the ‘British system’, which, according to many of my older interview partners, was distinct from the ‘Italian system’, which the Majeerteen and the other ‘southerners’ internalised. The difference between both ‘systems’ was, according to many Isaaq and also Dhulbahante and Warsangeli, that the British system respected Somali traditions, whereas the Italian system was more intrusive and repressive, particularly under the fascists. One effect was, according to Garaad Cabdiqani, that ‘the elders of the northern regions were more effective than the elders of the southern regions’ (interview with Garaad Cabdiqani,Laascaanood, 06.11.2003).


Garaad Cabdiqani, who in the early 2000s was in conflict with Cabdullahi Yuusuf, maintained that, genealogically, Dhulbahante and Majeerteen are brothers. But culturally and regarding their colonial history, ‘the Majeerteen belong to the south’ (interview with Garaad Cabdiqani, Laascaanood, 06.11 .2003).


Cabdullahi Jalac, a Warsangeli and the commander of the Somaliland police forces in Ceelbuuh in 2004, argued: ‘British were gob [good people]; Italians were gun [bad/‘second class’ people]. I am British.’
This is before 1960 nowadays it's different.Everything has balanced out. I don't know this fascination waqooyi have with the British but it can't be allowed to continue. The British took over our land by force and killed Somali men and women over our land.

Fuck the British and the Italians , long live Somali weyn!!!
 
This is before 1960 nowadays it's different.Everything has balanced out. I don't know this fascination waqooyi have with the British but it can't be allowed to continue. The British took over our land by force and killed Somali men and women over our land.

Fuck the British and the Italians , long live Somali weyn!!!
You'r'e out of touch with reality.


H.JPG
 

Hemaal

Jet life till my next life
VIP
The dark one is called Haweya Moahmed, I'll soon go to Mogadishu to have my share of that ******

:ahh:
 

John Michael

Free my girl Jodi!
VIP
@Foreman on one hand you guys whine about the south having access to better education and infrastructure and that's why you guys have start from scratch. But then it's I'm British. :icon lol:

My awoowe born and raised in the Deep South was employed by the British in galbeed, do you really believe that these borders actually served as distinct colonies? :cryinglaughsmiley:
 
@Foreman on one hand you guys whine about the south having access to better education and infrastructure and that's why you guys have start from scratch. But then it's I'm British. :icon lol:

My awoowe born and raised in the Deep South was employed by the British in galbeed, do you really believe that these borders actually served as distinct colonies? :cryinglaughsmiley:
Your point being?
 

Professor

The name is Professor, Haji Professor
This is before 1960 nowadays it's different.Everything has balanced out. I don't know this fascination waqooyi have with the British but it can't be allowed to continue. The British took over our land by force and killed Somali men and women over our land.

Fuck the British and the Italians , long live Somali weyn!!!
long live the Queen, fuck somaliweyn.
 
I'm not out of touch , I live among warsans. If someone talked admirably about colonialist gal they would get spit on.
:bell:
Maybe ts different in Hargeisa
:gucciwhat:


Hell I don't like the British either, they seceded reserved area to Ethiopia F 'em.

But you gotta give credit where it due, they didn't interfere with local traditions and practiced indirect rule as apposed to rest of Somalia. This has givin' rise of the distinctive northern identity. If you dispute this go ahead and prove me wrong.
 
Hell I don't like the British either, they seceded reserved area to Ethiopia F 'em.

But you gotta give credit where it due, they didn't interfere with local traditions and practiced indirect rule as apposed to rest of Somalia. This has givin' rise of the distinctive northern identity. If you dispute this go ahead and prove me wrong.
The identity died over the kacaan hold on the country. This might be true around 1960s to 1980s however nowadays northerners have morphed into the rest of Somali populace.
 
The identity died over the kacaan hold on the country. This might be true around 1960s to 1980s however nowadays northerners have morphed into the rest of Somali populace.
Explain to me how. The Kacaan pit the Harti/Dir and Isaaq against one another using northern culture, literate and history to drive a wedge between the northern communities and further consolidate his grip on power.
 

Apophis

Daludug Above all
VIP
Difference is Coldoon is a big unionist who criticizes foreign powers . As some ministers admitted Ethiopia was behind Coldoon's arrest.
The brother needs to be careful, I'm sure they are plans to take him out and blame it on alkebab
 
@Foreman ... you're saying being colonized by the brits produced a distinct northern culture?:drakewtf:
The vast majority of all over Somalis especially in those times were nomadic clans with no major difference in 'culture'. City dwellers had some differences but the nomads were mostly the same. Similarities between neighbouring clans is because of their close proximity not colonization wth.
 
@Foreman ... you're saying being colonized by the brits produced a distinct northern culture?:drakewtf:
The vast majority of all over Somalis especially in those times were nomadic clans with no major difference in 'culture'. City dwellers had some differences but the nomads were mostly the same. Similarities between neighbouring clans is because of their close proximity not colonization wth.
Than how come Warsangali and Dolbahante are closer to Isaaq in culture than their Harti brothers to the east despite sharing the same borders?



https://www.researchgate.net/public...te_and_Identity_Formation_in_Northern_Somalia
 
Than how come Warsangali and Dolbahante are closer to Isaaq in culture than their Harti brothers to the east despite sharing the same borders?



https://www.researchgate.net/public...te_and_Identity_Formation_in_Northern_Somalia
lmao as if Isaaq and Harti have different cultures to begin with. Im not going to read that long paper by some random white guy. Can you explain to us the distinct culture you're saying these clans have?
People share similarity as a whole to the people their closest to geographically that doesn't end at the borders you wish to believe in. The Somalis on the furthermost borders of Somaliweyn who live near Oromo or Kenyan tribes will have some similarities with them other Somalis who don't border them won't. Overall Somali culture is the same throughout.
 
lmao as if Isaaq and Harti have different cultures to begin with. Im not going to read that long paper by some random white guy. Can you explain to us the distinct culture you're saying these clans have?
People share similarity as a whole to the people their closest to geographically that doesn't end at the borders you wish to believe in. The Somalis on the furthermost borders of Somaliweyn who live near Oromo or Kenyan tribes will have some similarities with them other Somalis who don't border them won't. Overall Somali culture is the same throughout.

Here let me help you.


Another important effect of colonialism was that the different administrations of the Italians and the British indirectly encouraged the formation of different colonial identities. Older informants in the north-west distinguished the ‘British’ from the ‘Italian’ system. The former was generally connected with ‘law and order’, while the latter allegedly was characterised by ‘corruption’. Moreover, common experiences in school, which involved learning some English or Italian, and being subject to or part of the administration (in the case of civil servants), fostered an understanding of being a ‘northerner’ (the British Protectorate) or a ‘southerner’ (the Italian sphere).167


These social and cultural differences complemented the differences between the two ‘styles’ of colonialism in northern and southern Somalia (Prunier 2010). They became obvious after independence (see below), when many northerners came to the south, to Mogadishu, as part of the new government or in search of work or education. The southerners could not always easily accept those from the north (Luling 1976: 503).


I heard that the nickname for northerners was Soomaali khaldan, meaning ‘wrong Somalis’. Xasan Ciise Jaamac, who went to Mogadishu as a student in the mid-1960s explained: ‘Our Somaliland identity came up when we went to the south. When we went to Xamar [Mogadishu] we found out that we were different, that we also had a different dialect. When we were at Sheekh [in one of the two secondary schools of the protectorate in the 1950s] all of us were from the north; back then our identities were related to being “from Laascaanood”, “from Ceerigaabo”, “from Hargeysa” and so forth’ (interview with Xasan Ciise Jaamac, Hargeysa 09.10.2004). These dynamics aptly illustrate the constructivist position in social anthropological identity research that identity is a relational phenomenon.
 

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