Never, ever go into a business partnership with...

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At least in Somalia people know who the cheaters are. If you cheat or steal from someone just once you'll be known as a cheat by everyone and no one will do business with you.
People cheat the government because the cashflow is a donation. If you steal from your business it's beyond xoolonimo because you won't grow. Your competition will love you.
 
you're not the only one with that opinion :duck: somehow this opinion is held by every other Somali. Even in this thread everyone agrees. Everyone agrees so then who's the problem:bell: is there some magical somali boogeyman who causes all these problems and somehow everyone else is a saint :gnzbryw:. I'll bet most of you don't realize you fall under this category to someone else. Trust me I know a lot of these people :ftw9nwa: its like the girls who say I don't hang with girls...too much drama but seem oblivious to drama circling them. (Not aimed @ the op though...)
 
I can only speak 4 SL and you are right, there is a growing culture of xaasidnimo and envy that is prevalent among locals. Relative started a business and was telling me how everyone is trying to sabotage his project. When he applied for license they (local businessmen) did everything in their power to cancel and delay its issuance. Business ethics and professionalism are extinct, no regulations to protect your rights creating environment that promotes corruption and bribery to get by.

Common folks are no better, if they are not outright trying to steal from your company, they are selling you business plan/secrets to competitors for a price or start a copy-cat of their own! They see Qurba-joog money as fair game "fariidnimo" is to undermine, embezzle and leach off you employer. Parasitic scum.
 
Why do you think the country is a shithole ? the shaxaad culture has become normal, a person more wealthy then you will try to leech money of you and when he succeeds he will sit in a coffee shop boasting to his friends "doqonki ban shaxaadey"

In business back home your a fool unless the person is from the same sub-sub-sub-clan that wouldn't dare screw you even if he is a tuug, this is why religiously your commanded to write the contracts beforehand and produce witnesses etc.

There is a similar concept in Western countries, the people generally abide by these not because of some altruist moral pejorative they have but because of the consequences (prison/reputation/hefty fine)

If those people had the same system of 'trust' that we do (no contracts/witnesses as commanded) they would be no different then us and to argue they would is simply 'inferiority complex'.
 
Are you speaking from experience?
That's what I was wondering as well since he didn't even provide any annecdotal evidence to support his view.

There's nothing wrong in criticising certain aspects of Somali culture/society, but this self-loathing attitude amongst some here is starting to get tiring (not incl you @LarryThePuntite since you're rather experienced in these matters hence why I respect your views).

Here are two articles concerning Somali business activities in Kenya and South Africa:

Trust, in a good number of the Somali community resonates loudly in respect to raising enough capital among family members and close friends for a profitable venture as well as one that creates an even economic impact in the entire society.

Takaful Insurance Managing Director Hassan Bashir agrees that trust in the community has played an incredible role in fuelling success in their business growth.

“Ours is a business model that is based on trust as shown by the community. Such ventures thrive since it’s founded on the human spirit,” he argues.
Being a resilient people, Somalis have prospered because they are willing to take risks and accept smaller profits, which is another factor that has seen their business thrive. Abdullahi Dahir, the director at the Imara Daima Gardens, explains that when it comes to trade, “everyone wants to be very competitive in terms of the pricing factor, so it’s the margin that people are looking for.

While other traders are looking for a higher margin, a Somali trader is looking for a lower margin. They’re looking at the turnover.”
https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/art...ving-force-behind-many-somali-traders-success

In the Somali community, trust plays a major part when accessing business capital. They operate in strong social networks, and through partnerships and community resource pooling, risks are spread and thriving business are created. Somali entrepreneurs have a high appetite for risk and willingness to work anywhere.
Somalis also invest substantially more in their businesses than local traders. According to Rory Liederman from the University of the Western Cape, Somali start-up capital for a spaza shop (small grocery) in South Africa range between R30,000-R40,000 ($2,500-$3,330), whereas the average South African spaza starts operations with less than R5,000 ($415).

Somalis are also known for their value offerings and services. They often provide credit to their customers, without overextending the debtors’ column. Deals are made without contracts or unnecessary paperwork. They often sell certain stock keeping units (SKUs) at a loss and make successful use of the lost-leader strategy to create traffic and maximize turnover.
http://www.geeskaafrika.com/8473/business-lessons-i-have-learned-from-somali-traders/
 

Kaleel

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That's what I was wondering as well since he didn't even provide any annecdotal evidence to support his view.

There's nothing wrong in criticising certain aspects of Somali culture/society, but this self-loathing attitude amongst some here is starting to get tiring (not incl you @LarryThePuntite since you're rather experienced in these matters hence why I respect your views).

Here are two articles concerning Somali business activities in Kenya and South Africa:





https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/art...ving-force-behind-many-somali-traders-success





http://www.geeskaafrika.com/8473/business-lessons-i-have-learned-from-somali-traders/
We should encourage business among Somalis. If it's done within the law such as registered companies, shares etc, there would be less of this talk but some do business with little oversight so you can get away with a lot of things. It's doing bad business practice and expecting nothing goes wrong.
 
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