Why Dont Somali Kids Learn Trades

Arma

Leading the transformation
VIP
Instead of going to University, studying useless, no good degrees, such as business, humanities, and media.
These courses are no good, whatsoever. Yet, in colleges and universities, up and down the West, you'll find Somali kids enrolled on these courses.

They'd be far better off, enrolling on courses or going on an apprenticeship, in a trade.

Plumbing, carpentry, electrician, and my trade: stonemasonry, are some of the most well paying, rewarding jobs out there. You'll be self-employed, never without a job, and can work anywhere in the world.

I too nearly fell into the trap, of enrolling on a useless university course, I was gonna study broadcast journalism. But Alhamdulillah, my father talked me out of it. He instead recommended that I study a trade. He told me it would be a decision I'll never regret. And I thank him greatly for that.

I enrolled on a four year stonemasonry apprenticeship in London, and at the end of it, became a fully fledged stonemason. Alhamdulillah, I've earned a great salary, in all of the construction projects I've been part of. The thing was, I was the only Somali in my apprenticeship.

It's such a shame, I didn't have another Somali on my class. Its such a shame that not many, young Somali men, are not interested in learning a trade.
 
Instead of going to University, studying useless, no good degrees, such as business, humanities, and media.
These courses are no good, whatsoever. Yet, in colleges and universities, up and down the West, you'll find Somali kids enrolled on these courses.

They'd be far better off, enrolling on courses or going on an apprenticeship, in a trade.

Plumbing, carpentry, electrician, and my trade: stonemasonry, are some of the most well paying, rewarding jobs out there. You'll be self-employed, never without a job, and can work anywhere in the world.

I too nearly fell into the trap, of enrolling on a useless university course, I was gonna study broadcast journalism. But Alhamdulillah, my father talked me out of it. He instead recommended that I study a trade. He told me it would be a decision I'll never regret. And I thank him greatly for that.

I enrolled on a four year stonemasonry apprenticeship in London, and at the end of it, became a fully fledged stonemason. Alhamdulillah, I've earned a great salary, in all of the construction projects I've been part of. The thing was, I was the only Somali in my apprenticeship.

It's such a shame, I didn't have another Somali on my class. Its such a shame that not many, young Somali men, are not interested in learning a trade.
How much do you make and where can I learn
 

4head

The one and only 4head
VIP
I want to become a psychiatrist or a teacher. People are either mental ill or they are under educated and i'll move to East Africa after i finished uni. There are no that much of teachers who are willing to help these poor bastard.
 

kickz

Engineer of Qandala
SIYAASI
VIP
The problem with these fields is they are a young mans game, you won't find many 50 yr old welders or plumbers but plenty 50 year old doctors and engineers:gaasdrink:
 
Instead of going to University, studying useless, no good degrees, such as business, humanities, and media.
These courses are no good, whatsoever. Yet, in colleges and universities, up and down the West, you'll find Somali kids enrolled on these courses.

They'd be far better off, enrolling on courses or going on an apprenticeship, in a trade.

Plumbing, carpentry, electrician, and my trade: stonemasonry, are some of the most well paying, rewarding jobs out there. You'll be self-employed, never without a job, and can work anywhere in the world.

I too nearly fell into the trap, of enrolling on a useless university course, I was gonna study broadcast journalism. But Alhamdulillah, my father talked me out of it. He instead recommended that I study a trade. He told me it would be a decision I'll never regret. And I thank him greatly for that.

I enrolled on a four year stonemasonry apprenticeship in London, and at the end of it, became a fully fledged stonemason. Alhamdulillah, I've earned a great salary, in all of the construction projects I've been part of. The thing was, I was the only Somali in my apprenticeship.

It's such a shame, I didn't have another Somali on my class. Its such a shame that not many, young Somali men, are not interested in learning a trade.

I agree wholeheartedly, but I think that you did well because you had someone guide you (your Father), Some people do not have that. They are also lazy and so end up following the rest of the crowd. "What are my friends going to do? cos I'll just follow them".

It would be cool if somalis (anywhere) set up some sort of scheme where they spoke to young teenagers coming out of high school/sixth-form college (for the UK, college's would be 16 - 18 year olds) and speak about all the other routes that someone could take to still be successful, such as apprenticeships etc.
 
I agree wholeheartedly, but I think that you did well because you had someone guide you (your Father), Some people do not have that. They are also lazy and so end up following the rest of the crowd. "What are my friends going to do? cos I'll just follow them".

It would be cool if somalis (anywhere) set up some sort of scheme where they spoke to young teenagers coming out of high school/sixth-form college (for the UK, college's would be 16 - 18 year olds) and speak about all the other routes that someone could take to still be successful, such as apprenticeships etc.

To add on to this, I would say do a 2 month scheme during the Summer (from May - end of August for the Uk lot, I don't know when Summer is for Americans/Main-land Europeans). So a bunch of successful Somalis who have taken these alternative routes, to free up some of their time and speak and work with young somalis who show promise, and aid them.
 

Apollo

Staff Member
Instead of going to University, studying useless, no good degrees, such as business, humanities, and media.

I would not put Business degrees into the same useless category as those others. Most jobs are in the private sector (business) and the stuff you learn in a business program is quite useful in the job market. The problem is just that it is oversaturated (too many people with it).
 

Jake from State Farm

We pro xalimo all 2019
Instead of going to University, studying useless, no good degrees, such as business, humanities, and media.
These courses are no good, whatsoever. Yet, in colleges and universities, up and down the West, you'll find Somali kids enrolled on these courses.

They'd be far better off, enrolling on courses or going on an apprenticeship, in a trade.

Plumbing, carpentry, electrician, and my trade: stonemasonry, are some of the most well paying, rewarding jobs out there. You'll be self-employed, never without a job, and can work anywhere in the world.

I too nearly fell into the trap, of enrolling on a useless university course, I was gonna study broadcast journalism. But Alhamdulillah, my father talked me out of it. He instead recommended that I study a trade. He told me it would be a decision I'll never regret. And I thank him greatly for that.

I enrolled on a four year stonemasonry apprenticeship in London, and at the end of it, became a fully fledged stonemason. Alhamdulillah, I've earned a great salary, in all of the construction projects I've been part of. The thing was, I was the only Somali in my apprenticeship.

It's such a shame, I didn't have another Somali on my class. Its such a shame that not many, young Somali men, are not interested in learning a trade.
I know an electrician actually.

I use to wonder why he started working instead of going to school straight out of high school.

Now I know electricians make good money. That Dude is doing well.

I see him snapchat everyonce in awhile installing stuff in some rich neighborhoods close to downtown.
 

Basra

LOVE is a product of Doqoniimo mixed with lust
Let Them Eat Cake
VIP
Instead of going to University, studying useless, no good degrees, such as business, humanities, and media.
These courses are no good, whatsoever. Yet, in colleges and universities, up and down the West, you'll find Somali kids enrolled on these courses.

They'd be far better off, enrolling on courses or going on an apprenticeship, in a trade.

Plumbing, carpentry, electrician, and my trade: stonemasonry, are some of the most well paying, rewarding jobs out there. You'll be self-employed, never without a job, and can work anywhere in the world.

I too nearly fell into the trap, of enrolling on a useless university course, I was gonna study broadcast journalism. But Alhamdulillah, my father talked me out of it. He instead recommended that I study a trade. He told me it would be a decision I'll never regret. And I thank him greatly for that.

I enrolled on a four year stonemasonry apprenticeship in London, and at the end of it, became a fully fledged stonemason. Alhamdulillah, I've earned a great salary, in all of the construction projects I've been part of. The thing was, I was the only Somali in my apprenticeship.

It's such a shame, I didn't have another Somali on my class. Its such a shame that not many, young Somali men, are not interested in learning a trade.


I wki pedi-ed your trade profession & discovered u r a cave man. Working on an ancient industry. Arma i hope u also have a cave beard.



The craft of stonemasonry (or stonecraft) involves creating buildings, structures, and sculpture using stone from the earth, and is one of the oldest trades in human history. These materials have been used to construct many of the long-lasting, ancient
 

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