Way cheaper and more durable, cobblestone paved roads are Somalia's answer

Discussion in 'Development' started by Crow, Aug 17, 2019.

  1. Crow

    Crow PIF & PIM

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    I just read this 2015 World Bank report and an article about cobblestone roads in Ethiopia and am left wondering why we exclusively make asphalt roads when such a superior alternative is available.

    https://olc.worldbank.org/content/cobblestone-streets-cities-ethiopia
    https://citiesalliance.org/newsroom...ting-jobs-and-empowering-ethiopias-urban-poor

    Germans came to Ethiopia to train 150 pavers and 1150 chiselers and trainers in 2007. From 2012-2015, Ethiopians constructed 350 km of cobblestone roads in over 140 cities at a cost of 58 million euros.

    In the capital of Oromia, the cost of a cobblestone paved road was just 15 euros per square meter. A 200 m road, costs no more than 21,500 euros.

    The three main steps of cobblestone road paving include:
    1. Quarrying
      • Extracting raw material from a quarry near the city
    2. Chiseling
      • Transforming the raw material into cobblestones
    3. Paving
      • Laying the cobblestones
    The heavy and capital intensive machinery required to build the asphalt roads that we currently use across Somalia make it cost prohibitive to pave roads in most places, especially rural villages.

    Benefits of cobblestone paved roads
    • Far more durable and lower maintenance than asphalt roads
    • Cobblestones are reusable
    • Unlike asphalt, cobblestone roads are permeable, allowing water to penetrate the surface. This decreases flooding and replenishes groundwater stocks.
    • Significantly reduces dust and flooding which, in turn, reduces respiratory and waterborne illnesses like malaria and cholera
    • Provides charcoal workers alternative and environmentally friendly employment
    • Increases land value and promotes business along new roads
    • Teaches local municipal governments how to manage their own development projects due to the low costs and decentralized nature of the industry
    • Keeps money in the local economy since everything is made and sourced locally whereas asphalt flows money out through purchases of oil and machinery from different countries
    • Decreases public transportation costs
    • Provides employment for previously unemployed women and youth
    • Community driven so that locals have a stake in road quality as well as the skills to maintain it
    In December, reer Baydhabo completed Somalia's first cobblestone paved roads.

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    We need to do this in Puntland.
    @Abdalla @Reiko @Armadillo @Boqor Quark Boqor Cisman @PuntiteQueen @Reer-Bari @Finesse @MSGA @kickz @Manzana @GBTarmy @Karim @Tjioux @Farm @Tukraq @Abdisamad3 @halwa @Ugaaso @Suldaanka @Cabdi @Tucking_Fypo @Yonis @Thegoodshepherd @FBIsomalia @Nilotufian
     
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  2. kickz

    kickz Engineer of Qandala

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    Makes alot of sense, is there a place we can make these suggestions to the government
     
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  3. Crow

    Crow PIF & PIM

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    Not that I know of but if we can make a $50 million port without the government, this will be nothing. I know that once people gain the skills and start building these, they will pop up in villages and cities across Puntland. At 21,600 euros for just 200 m, this is probably the best bang for your buck for development.
     
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  4. FBIsomalia

    FBIsomalia

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    We need it badly specially on the villages on far east coast.
     
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  5. Somalinimo

    Somalinimo

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    You still believe in a government that's going to come save you . The same one that's the most corrupt government in the world.

    Do the shit yourselves. You want something, make it happen.
     
  6. Somalinimo

    Somalinimo

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    It's a good idea but how much does it cost. People talk about millions of dollars per mile. I doubt the materials cost that much.
     
  7. FBIsomalia

    FBIsomalia

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    He mention PL government not villa africa.
     
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  8. Khalid ali

    Khalid ali

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    we have a bunch in jigjiga
     
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  9. DR OSMAN

    DR OSMAN VIP

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    The amount of large trucks traffic in PL is too high for cobblestone to be feasible. It's not Oromia that only handles local oromo traffic, Oromia isn't a HUB of trade for Ethiopia. Places with 'sea ports' like PL or JL will need to build roads of higher quality to handle being hub for it's region. Cobble-stone is promising if you mean just 'neighborhood' areas with low amounts of traffic and lesser trucks.

    Cobblestone would suit places like Baydhabo since it isn't a HUB of trade, less traffic happening over there beyond their 'regional usage' only. PL is handling the trade usage of nearly 60% of Somalia from Burco to Hiiraan to Bosaso
     
  10. Inquisitive_

    Inquisitive_ VIP

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    This stuff is just for pavements and some small alley way type roads in residential areas.
     
  11. Somalinimo

    Somalinimo

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    Same PL which has elections with less than 70 voters. Sxb its much safer than the south but corruption is still present. Stop acting like PL is corruption free
     
  12. FBIsomalia

    FBIsomalia

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    PL governments did already rise fund for big projects, right now two main projects construction are, Sanaag road & Garcaad port. Dont compare PL government to the souties.
     
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  13. Crow

    Crow PIF & PIM

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    21,600 euros for 200 m in Oromia. It could cost more or less depending on the location.
    That's great. I would prefer training from reer Jigiga over training from reer Baydhabo for more than a few reasons.
    I haven't researched how cobblestone works with heavy truck traffic yet. But Puntland has low population density. Most of our villages, small towns, and residential areas do not see heavy truck traffic. It is these areas that I had in mind when making this thread.
     
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  14. Cabdi

    Cabdi

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    it would look good in Garowe
     
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  15. PuntiteQueen

    PuntiteQueen

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    We need this in alley ways and narrow residential areas that get a lot of foot traffic.

    It would look amazing in coastal villages and will help with tourism especially when we plant trees and flower beds on the sides.

    This is why people adore mediterranean villages.
     
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  16. GBTarmy

    GBTarmy

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    Jigjiga actually looks decently developed with good roads so not shocked that you guys have cobblestones as well, are there any good sidewalks?
     
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  17. GBTarmy

    GBTarmy

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    I love cobblestones we have them everywhere in Europe, its smart and looks great you don't always want paved road.
     
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  18. Khalid ali

    Khalid ali

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    not really just a couple
     
  19. Khalid ali

    Khalid ali

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    from what I've seen the cobblestones are just in the neighborhoods
     
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  20. DR OSMAN

    DR OSMAN VIP

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    @GBTarmy @Crow @Inquisitive_ @Khalid ali cobble-stone is good for light traffic. It depends on the vehicle usage in an area. One car per '5' houses is the rate of vehicles in Somalia. It's nothing like the western standard where it's 4 cars per household. They need asphalt to handle that volume of traffic. But light vehicles like cars are not even the problem in PL. It's those large trucks coming from Hiiraan and Burco and Galkacyo and Garowe and every TUULO inside them.They carry 'livestock' on the trucks when exporting thru Bosaso and they import from Bosaso 'bagaash' like market consumables when returning to their home regions. All of these cunts are 'whoring' PL infrastructure for a low petty 'tax' that probably doesn't even cover the maintenance of the road they use. You need a solid 'concrete' base for hiiraan to Bosaso road, even asphalt won't do with the weight being applied to it.

    The development of Hiiraan and Galmudug is paramount to PL, if they don't develop, our 'trade' will continue to remain in 'small consumables' for daily living. We need them to return to their home regions and begin construction of properties, roads, water and electricity. These ITEMS I bet will be handled by 'berbera' who will use it's big port as an excuse to steal the worth while trade. While we stick to silly BAGAASH and 'tinned can' shit.

    PL FIRST IN TRADE DEALS. OUR TRADE DEFICIT MUST BE HORRIBLE IN TERMS OF WHAT THE SOUTH/NORTH GAINS FROM US AND WHAT WE GAIN. I'LL TRY TO MEASURE IT WHEN IN PL, ASKING WHAT DO U GET DAILY IN RETURN FOR THE ABUSE THESE SOUTHIES DO TO YOUR ROAD? I BET IT'S DEFICIT.
     
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