NEWS Transforming Berbera into a world-class centre of trade

Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem

Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem
Group Chairman & CEO of DP World

Last month, I joined Muse Bihi Abdi, President of Somaliland, Ahmed Shide, Minister of Finance of Ethiopia, Dagmawit Moges, Minister of Transport of Ethiopia, and Mustafa Mohammed Omar, President of the Somali Regional State in Ethiopia, to officially inaugurate the new container terminal at Berbera Port, following completion of the first phase of its expansion.

The inauguration is a milestone in DP World’s partnership with the government of Somaliland. Together, we are realising our shared vision, long-term confidence, and intention to transform Berbera into a major maritime, industrial, and logistics hub in the Horn of Africa, especially for Ethiopian transit cargo.

Unlocking prosperity in the Horn of Africa

The Horn of Africa, home to the port city of Berbera, and with a population of more than 140 million people, is dynamic and ever-evolving. Despite the economic shocks of the pandemic, the region has showcased remarkable resilience, managing to grow by 0.88% in 2020. A testament to its growing consumer markets, natural commodities, and strategic location with excellent access to some of the world’s major trade sea lanes and land routes, from the Suez Canal to the Strait of Malacca.

However, the sharp decline in remittance levels and significantly reduced livestock exports to the GCC resulting from the pandemic are crucial issues the government will need to grapple with in the years to come to ensure a robust recovery.

A boost to trade competitiveness is a central focus of Berbera and the region as a whole. We stand ready to support its economic recovery through our activities at Berbera port and Berbera Economic Zone (BEZ) and I am confident that our continued investments will enable the region to capitalise on its post-Covid growth and growing FDI flows from markets such as South Korea.

A successful first phase of port expansion

Infrastructure is critical to economic recovery.

The first phase of Berbera port’s expansion began in October 2018, when President Abdi and I broke ground to start construction. Just two and half years on, we have a modern, world-class infrastructure asset that helps improve operational efficiency and productivity to meet growing demand. The new terminal, with a deep draft quay of 400 metres and three gantry cranes, is capable of handling the largest container vessels in operation today and increases the port’s capacity from the current 150,000 TEUs to 500,000 TEUs a year.

We are building a Berbera fit to handle the demands of today’s trade economy, whilst helping expedite its progress towards a self-reliant society. For example, edible oil was previously brought in pre-packaged containers, but now DP World is building a state-of-the-art facility that can store goods in bulk, and allow companies to package them locally.

But our work to develop Berbera into a major port in the Horn of Africa and for Eastern Africa does not stop there. Work is already underway to further expand the port in a second phase. This phase, a crucial part of our commitment to invest up to $442 million at Berbera port, will include an extension of the new container terminal’s quay by more than twice its current length, to a total of 1,000 metres. We will also be installing additional quay cranes to increase the port’s handling capacity to up to 2 million TEUs a year.

How we will bring FDI and jobs to Berbera and its neighbours

Moreover, to maximise the economic potential of Berbera’s strategic location and the benefits that will follow from the port’s ability to handle increased levels of trade, we are also rapidly developing the Berbera Economic Zone (BEZ).

Modelled on Jebel Ali Free Zone (Jafza), our flagship Free Zone in Dubai, BEZ will provide local and foreign investors with a conducive and competitive environment for investment and trade through readily available infrastructure including prebuilt warehousing facilities, serviced land plots, and office and business centre spaces. The BEZ, combined with the increased power of the Berbera port development, will also support Somaliland’s fast-growing neighbour, Ethiopia, as it seeks to bolster the export competitiveness of its manufacturers.

Ethiopia is one of the fastest growing economies in Africa and its policymakers and business leaders continue to be well poised to maximise results from improved national productivity as it aims to reach lower-middle-income status by 2025. I have no doubt that the new container terminal at Berbera Port and the BEZ can play an instrumental role in helping achieve this goal and the government’s 10-year perspective plan by offering Ethiopia opportunities for trade, infrastructure investment, and employment.

I am grateful to our customers, partners, suppliers, and the local community in Berbera, for their continued support, as well as our teams at DP World Berbera and in Dubai, for their hard work to successfully deliver this project. It is trade infrastructure that has ensured the region’s resilience, and it will be improved trade infrastructure that will fuel its recovery and growth.
 

angelplan

Staff Member
2020 CHESS CHAMP
BORAMA, AWDAL
Berbera in particular and Somaliland in general should avoid the Djibouti curse (epic port yet wealth not felt by average people). This why a percentage should be invested back in Berbera and the respective region Sahil. That should be used to build Sahil and Maroodi jeex. Development should be felt there Inchallah. Can not wait to cruise from Gebiley to Berbera and back to Hargeisa in highways.
 
Berbera in particular and Somaliland in general should avoid the Djibouti curse (epic port yet wealth not felt by average people). This why a percentage should be invested back in Berbera and the respective region Sahil. That should be used to build Sahil and Maroodi jeex. Development should be felt there Inchallah. Can not wait to cruise from Gebiley to Berbera and back to Hargeisa in highways.
Absolutely agree.

However, I don't think there is any chance of Somaliland being anything like Djibouti when it comes to managing the wealth generated from Berbera port.
The problem Djibouti has is that it is a dictatorship with practically zero accountability placed on the government.
Somaliland is far from perfect in that regard also, but it is much better than Djibouti. It has a vocal opposition party, a very political electorate who are very engaged in the competence of their government and pretty effective, largely independent press. That is not to say that corruption isn't a problem in Somaliland, it absolutely is, just that the mismanagement of the largest infrastructure project the country has ever would be transparent and not something that the government could get away with.

There is a provision in Somaliland law that states a percentage of the wealth generated from Berbera Port, will go back into the development of Saaxil.
 
All Somalia MPs voted against Berbera development. The cuqdad was palpable. Nothing mythical about.
:camby:

What? The government rejected the agreement because it cannot allow foreign countries to undermines its sovereignty. Rightly or wrongly, it believes that Somaliland is a part of Somalia (which it legally is). Attempting to block the deal was less about "cuqdad" and more about preserving the unity of the Somali state as described in the constitution.
 
What? The government rejected the agreement because it cannot allow foreign countries to undermines its sovereignty. Rightly or wrongly, it believes that Somaliland is a part of Somalia (which it legally is). Attempting to block the deal was less about "cuqdad" and more about preserving the unity of the Somali state as described in the constitution.
You believe that BS fantasty if you want to. It was entirely about cuqdad.
Somalia knows it has zero authority over Somaliland and had zero ability to stop the Berbera deal from happening. The reason that so many MP's gave for voting against it, was that they felt this was a bad deal and they felt the UAE was taking advantage of Somaliland. This in the face of them giving the OK for Turkey owning the the port of Muqdisho. This was just a disgusting attempt at xaasidnimo that failed miserably.

The fact that every MP rejected it is also representative of the Somalia population being on board with trying to stop a peaceful Somali state from developing it's country. Not a peep was heard from anyone in Somalia that felt it was wrong. They don't want to see anyone else enjoying progress and development, while they live in chaos and destruction everyday.

This was about xaasidnimo iyo cuqdad, period. The fake Somali nationalism only comes out when it suits them.
 

0117

Reborn
What? The government rejected the agreement because it cannot allow foreign countries to undermines its sovereignty. Rightly or wrongly, it believes that Somaliland is a part of Somalia (which it legally is). Attempting to block the deal was less about "cuqdad" and more about preserving the unity of the Somali state as described in the constitution.

Yes the constitution that was written up by the UN :pachah1:
DP World is a multinational company that complies with international law and it clearly didn't breach one here as the deal happened :superman:
 
Guys guys lets be honest when it comes to Somalias sovereignty over the Berbera deal it's argument can be summed up in one undeniable, irrefutable and unchangeable picture....

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You can frame this issue however you want but the FGS choosing to not to recognise a deal signed by a secessionist regime is not evidence their actions were driven by "cuqdad".

You can frame it however you want, the reality is this - despite all attempts by Somalia to stop Somaliland from developing, including pathetically crying to the international community, the Berbera Port development is a huge success. It is a source of pride for reer Somaliland, and a source of ciil for reer Somalia.
 
You can frame it however you want, the reality is this - despite all attempts by Somalia to stop Somaliland from developing, including pathetically crying to the international community, the Berbera Port development is a huge success.

I must preface that you have a very bizarre way of framing things. The use of emotionally charged descriptors like “cuqdad” and “xaasidnimo” is not a helpful means for geopolitical analysis. The truth is, Somalia used its available diplomatic and legal avenues to prevent another state from infringing on its territorial integrity and sovereignty. The FGS did not oppose the deal because they "don't want to see anyone else enjoying progress and development, while they live in chaos and destruction everyday every day." Leaving aside the offensive quality of this statement, this kind of rhetoric only serves to obfuscate.

The Berbera Port deal was signed during the height of the Qatar diplomatic crisis. The FGS had weathered significant pressure from the UAE for their policy of neutrality. Relations reached a nadir when the Emiratis attempted to smuggle $10 million into the country without federal approval - presumably to fund terror groups. The government naturally saw the port deal as an attempt to further undermine its authority. In an interview with TRT World, Ahmed Isse Awad, who was Foreign Minister at the time, said just as much:
Our position is that all agreements [have] to go through the proper channels and be done with the legitimate authorities.

If DP World involved the federal government in the deal, they would have enthusiastically supported the project. But the Emiratis didn’t. Instead, they chose to take a side and undermine Somalia’s sovereignty by deliberately excluding them from the process. The Somali government could not let this happen without protest as inaction is a tacit admission of Somaliland’s independence - which the government disputes. By doing nothing, they would only strengthen the case for de jure recognition as the only party opposing recognition is Somalia.
a source of ciil for reer Somalia.

It's really, really not. You only allege this because this kind of enmity is politically useful for your movement.
 
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Yes the constitution that was written up by the UN :pachah1:
DP World is a multinational company that complies with international law and it clearly didn't breach one here as the deal happened :superman:
Constitution was written by meles Zenawi , he made sure we wouldn't stabilize.

:farmajoyaab:
 
I must preface that you have a very bizarre way of framing things. The use of emotionally charged descriptors like “cuqdad” and “xaasidnimo” is not a helpful means for geopolitical analysis. The truth is, Somalia used its available diplomatic and legal avenues to prevent another state from infringing on its territorial integrity and sovereignty. The FGS did not oppose the deal because they "don't want to see anyone else enjoying progress and development, while they live in chaos and destruction everyday every day." Leaving aside the offensive quality of this statement, this kind of rhetoric only serves to obfuscate.

The Berbera Port deal was signed during the height of the Qatar diplomatic crisis. The FGS had weathered significant pressure from the UAE for their policy of neutrality. Relations reached a nadir when the Emiratis attempted to smuggle $10 million into the country without federal approval - presumably to fund terror groups. The government naturally saw the port deal as an attempt to further undermine its authority. In an interview with TRT World, Ahmed Isse Awad, who was Foreign Minister at the time, said just as much:


If DP World involved the federal government in the deal, they would have enthusiastically supported the project. But the Emiratis didn’t. Instead, they chose to take a side and undermine Somalia’s sovereignty by deliberately excluding them from the process. The Somali government could not let this happen without protest as inaction is a tacit admission of Somaliland’s independence - which the government disputes. By doing nothing, they would only strengthen the case for de jure recognition as the only party opposing recognition is Somalia.


It's really, really not. You only allege this because this kind of enmity is politically useful for your movement.

This is typical darod pompous. Everything you do is cuqdad based. SSC, Khatumo, Maakhir, naming buhoodle district cayn. It's in your genes mate:pachah1:

Your Fagash president and his politicians were against it because of cuqdad and hatred. DP world's subsidiary P&O signed a contract with Puntland, not Somalia, and the SFG didn't say a single word. There was no outrage by the fagash bots either.



We know your kind mate. Ciil iyo cuqdad ku dhinta :chrisfreshhah:
 
I must preface that you have a very bizarre way of framing things. The use of emotionally charged descriptors like “cuqdad” and “xaasidnimo” is not a helpful means for geopolitical analysis. The truth is, Somalia used its available diplomatic and legal avenues to prevent another state from infringing on its territorial integrity and sovereignty. The FGS did not oppose the deal because they "don't want to see anyone else enjoying progress and development, while they live in chaos and destruction everyday every day." Leaving aside the offensive quality of this statement, this kind of rhetoric only serves to obfuscate.

The Berbera Port deal was signed during the height of the Qatar diplomatic crisis. The FGS had weathered significant pressure from the UAE for their policy of neutrality. Relations reached a nadir when the Emiratis attempted to smuggle $10 million into the country without federal approval - presumably to fund terror groups. The government naturally saw the port deal as an attempt to further undermine its authority. In an interview with TRT World, Ahmed Isse Awad, who was Foreign Minister at the time, said just as much:


If DP World involved the federal government in the deal, they would have enthusiastically supported the project. But the Emiratis didn’t. Instead, they chose to take a side and undermine Somalia’s sovereignty by deliberately excluding them from the process. The Somali government could not let this happen without protest as inaction is a tacit admission of Somaliland’s independence - which the government disputes. By doing nothing, they would only strengthen the case for de jure recognition as the only party opposing recognition is Somalia.


It's really, really not. You only allege this because this kind of enmity is politically useful for your movement.
You speak in a lot of hypotheticals and fantasy what if scenarios. Here is the simple reality that supports everything I've said so far.

1. The Somalia government, supported by the parliament at every turn, has at every opportunity tried to undermine any and all activities that Somaliland has tried to undertake in order to develop and progress its land and its people. The BS argument of "sovereignty" is easily disproven. They have gone as low as using aid money as a political ploy to and I quote Farmaajo "bring them to their knees". Even after agreeing not to do so after the Istanbul conference, they have gone right back to doing so again and again. Case in point - the aid intended for Somaliland to combat locust plagues. Countries like the UK, Denmark, Holland etc now distribute that money directly to Somaliland, whom they don't recognise as an independent country, because they know Somalia will disgustingly use it as a weapon.

2. You can huff and puff all you want about the "geo-political" crisis that you believe was a driving force in the actions Somalia took on the Berbera DP World deal. The government of Somalia would have gone to any lengths it could to undermine the deal, even if it was with geo-politically insignificant entities like East Timor or Palau. History proves that. There hasn't been a single development project in Somaliland that Somalia hasn't tried to scupper/undermine. The fact they fail every time is a testament to their incompetence, not due to their lack of effort.

3. Well done for spotting my spelling mistake on an online forum of using "everyday" instead of "every day". That was very noteworthy.

4. From many of your politicians to significant numbers of your citizens/diaspora on social media platforms, the reaction to the Berbera Port development was overflowing with ciil and cuqdad. It was not subtle, and they were not trying to hide it. No allegation about it, these are facts. The fact that so many people from Somalia have that reaction to a 100% positive development that does not harm anyone and has the potential to lift many Somalis out of poverty, should tell any objective observer what load of horseshit the "Somalinimo" argument for trying to reunite Somaliland with Somalia is. As demonstrated in small part by the examples above, and more importantly time and time again by the actions of the Somalia government and many of its people, the reality is that desire is based on xaasidnimo and cuqdad, plain and simple.
 
This is typical darod pompous. Everything you do is cuqdad based. SSC, Khatumo, Maakhir, naming buhoodle district cayn. It's in your genes mate:pachah1:

Your Fagash president and his politicians were against it because of cuqdad and hatred. DP world's subsidiary P&O signed a contract with Puntland, not Somalia, and the SFG didn't say a single word. There was no outrage by the fagash bots either.



We know your kind mate. Ciil iyo cuqdad ku dhinta :chrisfreshhah:
tenor.gif
 
@The Crowe Let's agree to disagree.
This is typical darod pompous.

To set the record straight, I am not Darood, nor do I identify by qabil. I am Somali first and Somali last. The fact you were this off should give you an idea about the futility of divining someone's qabil via forum posts.

Ironically, the people I argue with the most on this forum tend to be Puntland supporters from the diaspora. Here's a comment from the last argument I got into:
Why? So you can dismiss what I've said and avoid having to confront the irrationality of your beliefs? This is a naked attempt to subvert the discussion. To be clear, I don't identify by clan. I am a Somali first and Somali last. The benefit of growing up in a first world country is you can see qabil for what it really is: a relic from a less enlightened time. And one that has severely outstayed its welcome.

My advice? Let it go. For all your laandheerenimo, your people (all 16 million of them) live in abject poverty. Political instability stemming from clan politics gatekeeps any meaningful attempt to improve their material reality. Don't contribute to this by legitimising these parochial divisions. We can, and should, move past it.

You can find a couple of other chains by searching my comment history. To be clear, I absolutely abhor qabil and how it divides Somalis.
Ciil iyo cuqdad ku dhinta :chrisfreshhah:

I cannot overstate how far my life is removed from these issues. I did not want @The Crowe's initial claims to remain unchallenged because I thought they misrepresented the situation. I hope you can understand that.
 
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