The most patriotic word is not even Somali

Mighty

If wars can be started with lies, so can peace.
I will explain this on some words of @Lolalola 's List :

1) Dawlad comes from the root "Daa-la". Every arabic root-verb has several meanings. One of the meanings of Daa-la is to change from one condition to another.

2) Kursi comes from the root "Ka-ra-sa". One of the meanings of this root is to found a building. Another meaning is to devote time for something.

3) Saxan comes from the root Sa-xa-na. Three of the meanings of this root are to kick/stump with the feets, to hit a child or to serve a guest something on a plate.

4) Kudharta comes from the root "kha-da-ra". One meaning of this root is to make something green.

5) Shah has no arabic root latter, hence it is not an arabic word. Arab/persians/turks used this loan word in their languages, but the root of the word is from china and refers, if i'm not wrong, to a certain plant. This word came through Arabs to Somalia like the words Baabuur (Ottman language), or Khiyaal (persian).

I gave you some examples and what you have to know is the meaning of the root and a word has always a connection, but is not always crystal clear at the beginning.The connection between The word Kudhaar (vegetables) and it's root "kha-da-ra(to make something green)" is very easy to detect. All vegetables comes from the flora which is almost green. On the other hand you don't see immediately the connection between the word Dawlad (government) and it's root "Daa-la" (to change from one state into another).
Interesting, but what about words like warqaad which literally means informaition carrier/ news carrier.
War= news/information/speech.
Qaad= take/to take/carrie/ to carrie.

It is kinda like the name Warsame.
 
Interesting, but what about words like warqaad which literally means informaition carrier/ news carrier.
War= news/information/speech.
Qaad= take/to take/carrie/ to carrie.

It is kinda like the name Warsame.
One thing is for sure, the word warqad is arabic and comes from the root "waraqa". I think it is a coincidence, that war and qaad have both a meaning which are suitable in this case. By the way Warsame is a very nice name.

Arabic has influenced our language like no other language i know about. For example the name Sharmake is Shar-ma-arke and means that he don't see any evil. So besides the Arabic loan words you plenty Somali words which have still Arabic origin, but are not actually used in the arabic language. I personally estimate Arabic to be at least 20 percent of our spoken language, but there is no research on that as far as i know.
 
One thing is for sure, the word warqad is arabic and comes from the root "waraqa". I think it is a coincidence, that war and qaad have both a meaning which are suitable in this case. By the way Warsame is a very nice name.

Arabic has influenced our language like no other language i know about. For example the name Sharmake is Shar-ma-arke and means that he don't see any evil. So besides the Arabic loan words you plenty Somali words which have still Arabic origin, but are not actually used in the arabic language. I personally estimate Arabic to be at least 20 percent of our spoken language, but there is no research on that as far as i know.
exactly that is what I was trying to say I think it may even be more thn 20% if you add in old arabic words like xaaq and indirect arabic loan words from other languages
 
exactly that is what I was trying to say I think it may even be more thn 20% if you add in old arabic words like xaaq and indirect arabic loan words from other languages
But we have to be clear that it is only spoken modern Somali. It could be even 30 Percent in northern regions like Djibouti and Somaliland. As for classical Somali, Arabic words are not that much and you have for every Arabic word at least 2 or 3 other Somali words. Somali is a nomadic langauge, hence it speakers are very eloquent, compared to urban languages like English for example. The sentence "i don't know" in English can be said in at least four sentences in Somali with completely the same meaning (ma garanayo, ma kasayo, ma aqaan and ma ogi).
 
Interesting, but what about words like warqaad which literally means informaition carrier/ news carrier.
War= news/information/speech.
Qaad= take/to take/carrie/ to carrie.

It is kinda like the name Warsame.
Warqad is a loanword. If a word ends with -ad it's most likely from Arabic. Like silsilad, daaqad/dariishad and so on.
 

Mighty

If wars can be started with lies, so can peace.
Warqad is a loanword. If a word ends with -ad it's most likely from Arabic. Like silsilad, daaqad/dariishad and so on.
That would be the case if the word was warqaad in Arabic instead of waraqa. I do not find it plausible that warqaad is simply waraqa rearrangement and even adding another letter(d) whilst keeping what already made sense (war) in intact. Boyaad, raad,dheeraad and dad are words that end with -ad.
 
That would be the case if the word was warqaad in Arabic instead of waraqa. I do not find it plausible that warqaad is simply waraqa rearrangement and even adding another letter(d) whilst keeping what already made sense (war) in intact. Boyaad, raad,dheeraad and dad are words that end with -ad.
I didn't mean all words sxb. In somali we add the d even though the Arabic word doesn't have it.

Like shaahshad=shaasha, silsilad=silsila, daaqad/dariishad=daaqa/dariisha, Warqad=waraqa, shandad=shanda.
 
@Mighty

1. I don't speak any other Afro-Asiatic language besides Somali and some Arabic so unfortunately I can't compare or contrast, but akhi our language has undeniably so many words from Arabic. I don't have any official statistics as there hasn't been any research done on Somali lingustics, but I can assume. If Spanish is 8% Arabic (705), then it's not difficult to conclude that Somali has at least that if not 2x or 3x more.

You brushing it off as a "coincidence" actually speaks anti-Arab bias on your end, but okay.
You should compare the Romance languages and check out for lexical similarities, and that would be a closer comparison than Arabic and Spanish because Somali and Arabic are both Afro-Asiatic languages.

Italian lexical similarities with other languages,



Somali might have over 20% loanwords from Arabic, but this is not that much comparing it to other languages like English.


Link
I think the question was about borrowing from languages and not other language families. The following chart and section concisely shows the details:

(File:Origins of English PieChart 2D.svg, Wikimedia Commons/Jak)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eng...

For convenience it is pasted here:
A computerised survey of about 80,000 words in the old Shorter Oxford Dictionary (3rd ed.) was published in Ordered Profusion by Thomas Finkenstaedt and Dieter Wolff (1973)[103] that estimated the origin of English words as follows:

Influences in English vocabulary
  • Langue d'oïl, including French and Old Norman: 28.3%
  • Latin, including modern scientific and technical Latin: 28.24%
  • Germanic languages (including words directly inherited from Old English; does not include Germanic words coming from the Germanic element in French, Latin or other Romance languages): 25%
  • Greek: 5.32%
  • No etymology given: 4.03%
  • Derived from proper names: 3.28%
  • All other languages: less than 1%
A survey by Joseph M. Williams in Origins of the English Language of 10,000 words taken from several thousand business letters gave this set of statistics:[104]
  • French (langue d'oïl): 41%
  • "Native" English: 33%
  • Latin: 15%
  • Old Norse: 2%
  • Dutch: 1%
  • Other: 10%¨

Having loanwords is expected. How many loanwords do you think the Spanish language would have if you include other European languages? I bet it would be more than 20% also.
 

Mighty

If wars can be started with lies, so can peace.
I didn't mean all words sxb. In somali we add the d even though the Arabic word doesn't have it.

Like shaahshad=shaasha, silsilad=silsila, daaqad/dariishad=daaqa/dariisha, Warqad=waraqa, shandad=shanda.
Do you realise not a single word you listed is rearranged like warqaad is? They are only adjusted to Somali grammar with just D added at the end. It should be waraqad and not warqaad, the later consists of two separate words that create a well-organized word.
 
Do you realise not a single word you listed is rearranged like warqaad is? They are only adjusted to Somali grammar with just D added at the end. It should be waraqad and not warqaad, the later consists of two separate words that create a well-organized word.
The word in Arabic is not waraqa it is waraqa with the stress being on the wa it's also warqad not warqaad in somali
 
Do you realise not a single word you listed is rearranged like warqaad is? They are only adjusted to Somali grammar with just D added at the end. It should be waraqad and not warqaad, the later consists of two separate words that create a well-organized word.
What about malqacad which becomes malcaqa. the letters may change sxb.
 
Somalis have imported many different words from Arabic. A good example is the days of the week that we use everyday:

Isniin (Monday)

Salaasad (Tuesday)

Arbaca (Wednesday)

Khamiis (Thursday)

Jumca (Friday)

Sabti (Saturday)

Axad (Sunday).


Most loanwords are essentially corrupted due to exposure to a more dominant language. So the argument that warqad is different from waraqa is null and void.

Anti Arab hysteria shouldn't be a justification to misrepresent facts.
 

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