"Terminal Lucidity"

Status
Not open for further replies.

VixR

Veritas
On instinctively knowing it's the end.

An old lady pulls someone aside and glibly tells them in a state of unusual cheer she was going die that day.

The conversation with the employee went as follows:

Lady: "You guys have been so kind, I have to thank you. *cheerfully* I wish I could take you all with me."

Them:" ...where?"

Lady: "To the bottom."

Them: *thinks she must be confused* "To the bottom of what, so-and-so?"

Lady: "To the bottom of hell" *laughs*

Them: -
"Are you ok, s-o-s?"

Lady: Yes, I'm fine.

It was logged as a behavioral episode. Hours later, we'd be logging, on the same date, only a couple unrelated logs down from the earlier submission, that she'd passed away that day and 'would be missed'.

She'd looked fine. Happier and more animated than she's been for a while that day. She'd had to give up her million dollar home, her life, and had been living in a state of depression for the last four months at a facility. She'd even taken her meds fine, whole pills, that day. She'd even eaten her meals fine that day, with wine, quite unlike most old folk deaths you'd see who die suddenly to a chronic episode, or prolongedly because they stopped taking in sustinence as their body breaks down over the last few days/week of their life into what looks like a sleeping coma, lying inanimate, even as their breathing becomes labored and their lungs make a loud racket with every breath they take, administered liquid morphine from syringes so their groans of pain aren't felt by them, or heard by us.

The nurse calls her son. The phone line disconnects at the most inopportune moment right after she tells him his mother had passed, and she has to call back. He'd been at a birthday party that was being thrown in his honor.

Later, a 50-something year old man cries on your shoulder. No one tells him about his mother's last words.
 
That's not a bad way to kick the bucket. Looks like she didn't suffer and maintained her sense of humour to the end. It's the drawn out comatose state I wanna avoid.

I'm assuming this is from personal experience? Epic.
 
Pretty good, how are you?

I agree..but it was so trippy to see.
What brand of wine was she knocking back for her last meal? Sounds like a fun way to go. That's why I always keep my whiskey cabinet stocked. You never know when the angel of death will come storming in and you have to take a final gulp of the divine liquid.
 

VixR

Veritas
What brand of wine was she knocking back for her last meal? Sounds like a fun way to go. That's why I always keep my whiskey cabinet stocked. You never know when the angel of death will come storming in and you have to take a final gulp of the divine liquid.
Idk, probably a red. She liked reds.

Probably not the last thing you want to do as a Muslim if you actually believe in an angel of death though..
 
Idk, probably a red. She liked reds.

Probably not the last thing you want to do as a Muslim if you actually believe in an angel of death though..
Red is not a bad choice. It has medicinal properties.

The AOD is a tolerant angel. When he came to Musa, the prophet slapped him in the face and told him to go away. And guess what, he did. He's a reasonable sort.
 

GodKnowsBest

Somaliweyn Unionist
On instinctively knowing it's the end.

An old lady pulls someone aside and glibly tells them in a state of unusual cheer she was going die that day.

The conversation with the employee went as follows:

Lady: "You guys have been so kind, I have to thank you. *cheerfully* I wish I could take you all with me."

Them:" ...where?"

Lady: "To the bottom."

Them: *thinks she must be confused* "To the bottom of what, so-and-so?"

Lady: "To the bottom of hell" *laughs*

Them: -
"Are you ok, s-o-s?"

Lady: Yes, I'm fine.

It was logged as a behavioral episode. Hours later, we'd be logging, on the same date, only a couple unrelated logs down from the earlier submission, that she'd passed away that day and 'would be missed'.

She'd looked fine. Happier and more animated than she's been for a while that day. She'd had to give up her million dollar home, her life, and had been living in a state of depression for the last four months at a facility. She'd even taken her meds fine, whole pills, that day. She'd even eaten her meals fine that day, with wine, quite unlike most old folk deaths you'd see who die suddenly to a chronic episode, or prolongedly because they stopped taking in sustinence as their body breaks down over the last few days/week of their life into what looks like a sleeping coma, lying inanimate, even as their breathing becomes labored and their lungs make a loud racket with every breath they take, administered liquid morphine from syringes so their groans of pain aren't felt by them, or heard by us.

The nurse calls her son. The phone line disconnects at the most inopportune moment right after she tells him his mother had passed, and she has to call back. He'd been at a birthday party that was being thrown in his honor.

Later, a 50-something year old man cries on your shoulder. No one tells him about his mother's last words.
Wait are you not bound to HIPA and confidentiality policies? Beautiful way to end though-minus the hell part.

God can save an individual even during their last breath if they repent. No sin is unforgivable by the Lord and Powerful Almighty in heaven, Allah AzzawatulJal.

Also WELCOME BACK @VixR WE MISSED YOU! <3
 

VixR

Veritas
Wait are you not bound to HIPA and confidentiality policies? Beautiful way to end though-minus the hell part.

God can save an individual even during their last breath if they repent. No sin is unforgivable by the Lord and Powerful Almighty in heaven, Allah AzzawatulJal.

Also WELCOME BACK @VixR WE MISSED YOU! <3
Hey, thanks!

Nah, it's not under HIPAA.
I take it you're not a Christian anymore? :cosbyhmm:
 
On instinctively knowing it's the end.

An old lady pulls someone aside and glibly tells them in a state of unusual cheer she was going die that day.

The conversation with the employee went as follows:

Lady: "You guys have been so kind, I have to thank you. *cheerfully* I wish I could take you all with me."

Them:" ...where?"

Lady: "To the bottom."

Them: *thinks she must be confused* "To the bottom of what, so-and-so?"

Lady: "To the bottom of hell" *laughs*

Them: -
"Are you ok, s-o-s?"

Lady: Yes, I'm fine.

It was logged as a behavioral episode. Hours later, we'd be logging, on the same date, only a couple unrelated logs down from the earlier submission, that she'd passed away that day and 'would be missed'.

She'd looked fine. Happier and more animated than she's been for a while that day. She'd had to give up her million dollar home, her life, and had been living in a state of depression for the last four months at a facility. She'd even taken her meds fine, whole pills, that day. She'd even eaten her meals fine that day, with wine, quite unlike most old folk deaths you'd see who die suddenly to a chronic episode, or prolongedly because they stopped taking in sustinence as their body breaks down over the last few days/week of their life into what looks like a sleeping coma, lying inanimate, even as their breathing becomes labored and their lungs make a loud racket with every breath they take, administered liquid morphine from syringes so their groans of pain aren't felt by them, or heard by us.

The nurse calls her son. The phone line disconnects at the most inopportune moment right after she tells him his mother had passed, and she has to call back. He'd been at a birthday party that was being thrown in his honor.

Later, a 50-something year old man cries on your shoulder. No one tells him about his mother's last words.
Thats deep. Perhaps she was able to mask her pains and troubles before kicking the bucket. Im not a believer of premonitions but a visual of your own death in the near future would be debilitating for me not to mention seeing death on a daily basis. Seems like the medical field also produces psychiatric patients as well as treating them. :francis:
 

VixR

Veritas
Thats deep. Perhaps she was able to mask her pains and troubles before kicking the bucket. Im not a believer of premonitions but a visual of your own death in the near future would be debilitating for me not to mention seeing death on a daily basis. Seems like the medical field also produces psychiatric patients as well as treating them. :francis:
She didn't have a vision, she said she felt it coming. Maybe it's a physical thing. I can't say. I'd only ever heard of it before (until now), but some ppl get a sudden rush of lucidity and strength and cheerfulness before they go lights out. But this lady also knew it was time.
 

shan-futo-le

The last suugo bender
She didn't have a vision, she said she felt it coming. Maybe it's a physical thing. I can't say. I'd only ever heard of it before (until now), but some ppl get a sudden rush of lucidity and strength and cheerfulness before they go lights out. But this lady also knew it was time.
what reasoning went behind with calling it a 'physical thing' it clearly was a more intuitive feeling than a physical one like how some people or animals can sense danger our intuition is our 6th sense to say the least. That gut feeling hat you failed the exam or something 'feels' wrong.
 

VixR

Veritas
what reasoning went behind with calling it a 'physical thing' it clearly was a more intuitive feeling than a physical one like how some people or animals can sense danger our intuition is our 6th sense to say the least. That gut feeling hat you failed the exam or something 'feels' wrong.
Gut feelings manifest physically, so it's difficult to separate a physical awareness from an intuitive one. Just right now I felt someone staring at me, and I looked over, and there it was, a weirdo starer and a battle of wills on who backs down first. In the case of death, it's very much a physical transition. Your body's shutting down for good. I don't feel it's strange to feel it coming provided it isn't sudden and unexpected, which it isn't in the case of someone well into their late 80's-90's.
 

shan-futo-le

The last suugo bender
Gut feelings manifest physically, so it's difficult to separate a physical awareness from an intuitive one. Just right now I felt someone staring at me, and I looked over, and there it was, a weirdo starer and a battle of wills on who backs down first. In the case of death, it's very much a physical transition. Your body's shutting down for good. I don't feel it's strange to feel it coming provided it isn't sudden and unexpected, which it isn't in the case of someone well into their late 80's-90's.
being aware of your feelings can be manifested physically?? , being aware that you are in conscious state is a manifestation through our physical form huh??? didn't know (being sarcastic) , my point is there are some mental and otherwise 'spiritual' awareness that just aren't felt physically they are felt on a more psychological or metaphysical level , if i feel that something is not right or in your case you felt someone staring at your that isn't necessarily 'physical manifestation' here she felt her death was (coming) before she physically experienced any pain or weakness etc. I don't know if i'm explaining this right.

"An emotional experience, by virtue of being a conscious experience, is necessarily a feeling, as are physical sensations such as hunger or pain (although not all conscious experiences are also feelings, not, for example, believing or seeing, presumably because they lack a somatic or bodily dimension). "

here's a quote that kind of sums up how feelings are more of a conscious experience rather than a physical one although they can be i.e hunger , not in this case though.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Trending

Top