Somali alphabet

What alphabet should somalis use


  • Total voters
    19

greyhound stone

The Boss💎
What script do you want us to use
Wadad it's the best for the somali language. Easiest to adjust the somali language as its a fellow afro asiatic language with very similar sounds to somali. Also geeljires won't have no tribalism towards it. Somalis generally can already read arabic so it shouldn't be too hard. We can slightly tweak to suit the somali language and some of its unique sounds
 

Gacanka Cadmeed

انا عربي, سْنْمْ هَنولاتو‌‌‌‌, Free Azawad
using wadaad is kinda embarrassing not going to lie. we got neighbours who created a script thousands of years ago and we are using something we modified from arabic :deadpeter:
It's even more embarrassing to use a script invented a few decades ago. At least we have a long history of using the Arabic script. Remember even Malay used to use the Arabic script
 

Gacanka Cadmeed

انا عربي, سْنْمْ هَنولاتو‌‌‌‌, Free Azawad
What are you trying to say?? They aren't habar jeclo or are they habar awal. Can you explain to me issaq clan history?? I'm very uneducated on this topic
1619950495715.png

Tol jeclo moved to stay with his tol when the mother of Habar Magaadle died. Muse, Sanbuur and ibraan stayed with their mother. Habar jeclo is 95% muse and the other brothers are langaabs.
 
It should be like the Japanese alphabet. For example: Borrowing Arabic letters for certain words like how Japan borrowed the Chinese letters. Maybe use Latin for foreign loan words or something like that
 
Like Kanji, hirigana and katakana
Too ridiculous. East Asians really lost the script with their overcomplicated writing scripts. The Chinese are the worst offenders. Having to learn over a thousand characters...

Everyone has heard that Chinese is hard because of the huge number of characters one has to learn, and this is absolutely true. There are a lot of popular books and articles that downplay this difficulty, saying things like "Despite the fact that Chinese has [10,000, 25,000, 50,000, take your pick] separate characters you really only need 2,000 or so to read a newspaper". Poppycock. I couldn't comfortably read a newspaper when I had 2,000 characters under my belt. I often had to look up several characters per line, and even after that I had trouble pulling the meaning out of the article. (I take it as a given that what is meant by "read" in this context is "read and basically comprehend the text without having to look up dozens of characters"; otherwise the claim is rather empty.)

...

This kind of "sink or swim" approach just doesn't work in Chinese. At the end of three years of learning Chinese, I hadn't yet read a single complete novel. I found it just too hard, impossibly slow, and unrewarding. Newspapers, too, were still too daunting. I couldn't read an article without looking up about every tenth character, and it was not uncommon for me to scan the front page of the People's Daily and not be able to completely decipher a single headline. Someone at that time suggested I read The Dream of the Red Chamber and gave me a nice three-volume edition. I just have to laugh. It still sits on my shelf like a fat, smug Buddha, only the first twenty or so pages filled with scribbled definitions and question marks, the rest crisp and virgin. After six years of studying Chinese, I'm still not at a level where I can actually read it without an English translation to consult. (By "read it", I mean, of course, "read it for pleasure". I suppose if someone put a gun to my head and a dictionary in my hand, I could get through it.) Simply diving into the vast pool of Chinese in the beginning is not only foolhardy, it can even be counterproductive. As George Kennedy writes, "The difficulty of memorizing a Chinese ideograph as compared with the difficulty of learning a new word in a European language, is such that a rigid economy of mental effort is imperative."6 This is, if anything, an understatement. With the risk of drowning so great, the student is better advised to spend more time in the shallow end treading water before heading toward the deep end.

 

Gacanka Cadmeed

انا عربي, سْنْمْ هَنولاتو‌‌‌‌, Free Azawad
Too ridiculous. East Asians really lost the script with their overcomplicated writing scripts. The Chinese are the worst offenders. Having to learn over a thousand characters...

Everyone has heard that Chinese is hard because of the huge number of characters one has to learn, and this is absolutely true. There are a lot of popular books and articles that downplay this difficulty, saying things like "Despite the fact that Chinese has [10,000, 25,000, 50,000, take your pick] separate characters you really only need 2,000 or so to read a newspaper". Poppycock. I couldn't comfortably read a newspaper when I had 2,000 characters under my belt. I often had to look up several characters per line, and even after that I had trouble pulling the meaning out of the article. (I take it as a given that what is meant by "read" in this context is "read and basically comprehend the text without having to look up dozens of characters"; otherwise the claim is rather empty.)

...

This kind of "sink or swim" approach just doesn't work in Chinese. At the end of three years of learning Chinese, I hadn't yet read a single complete novel. I found it just too hard, impossibly slow, and unrewarding. Newspapers, too, were still too daunting. I couldn't read an article without looking up about every tenth character, and it was not uncommon for me to scan the front page of the People's Daily and not be able to completely decipher a single headline. Someone at that time suggested I read The Dream of the Red Chamber and gave me a nice three-volume edition. I just have to laugh. It still sits on my shelf like a fat, smug Buddha, only the first twenty or so pages filled with scribbled definitions and question marks, the rest crisp and virgin. After six years of studying Chinese, I'm still not at a level where I can actually read it without an English translation to consult. (By "read it", I mean, of course, "read it for pleasure". I suppose if someone put a gun to my head and a dictionary in my hand, I could get through it.) Simply diving into the vast pool of Chinese in the beginning is not only foolhardy, it can even be counterproductive. As George Kennedy writes, "The difficulty of memorizing a Chinese ideograph as compared with the difficulty of learning a new word in a European language, is such that a rigid economy of mental effort is imperative."6 This is, if anything, an understatement. With the risk of drowning so great, the student is better advised to spend more time in the shallow end treading water before heading toward the deep end.

I tried learning Mandarin :ileycry:
And Cantonese is even harder apparently.
 

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