News anchors in Sudan no longer wear hijab

It's a pretty big deal since these channels used to be run by islamists and they required all women to cover their hair. Now their anchors don't even wear it and I noticed they have more "diversely" sudanese looking women and not just the very pale ones with slim features.


Another odd thing is how they're wearing western clothing on national television in one of the most conservative countries in the muslim world.
 
There's no more religious police so some people are upset that women can now wear what they want and smoke in public with zero punishment. Not covering your hair wasn't an issue in society but wearing short/tight clothes and smoking is a huge taboo.

 

Al Muslim

الموت لامريكا الموت لإسرائيل
Most Sudanese channels still have conservative clothing fortunately. This disgusting UAE backed government massacred protesters, tried to establish ties with israel, and is now fighting against Islam in Sudan. Their depravity knows no bounds.

Inshallah the situation becomes better there.
 
Most Sudanese channels still have conservative clothing fortunately. This disgusting UAE backed government massacred protesters, tried to establish ties with israel, and is now fighting against Islam in Sudan. Their depravity knows no bounds.

Inshallah the situation becomes better there.
That's true but it's changing very fast. I wouldn't be shocked if no woman covers up or wears traditional clothes on tv again. Sudanese society has the hive mentality so when one woman does something the rest copy them.

So they went from one extreme to another? :kanyehmm:
Sadly. I don't like how western clothing looks on them i'm more used to traditional covering.
 
@Asaana

Why are Sudanese people acting like these things weren't going on during Bashirs regime, at least in secret per se. During his regime there was a big drug problem going on amongst the Sudanese youth.

"Bungo" is the Sudani Arabic word for weed, many of the highly educated Sudanese university students were smoking the drug in their thousands. Not to mention how easy it was to purchase alcohol and illegal drug pills from those elderly Sudanese coffee and tea sellers usually after 7pm at night in places like Nile Street(both of ones in Khartoum and Omdurman), other places like well known street markets like Soug Libya where you could find Sudanese people drinking and smoking dope even after iftar during Ramadan in Sudan.

Not sure why you mentioned the religious police in Sudan as if they properly doing their jobs when half of the time they were taking bribes from people and then letting them off the hook for crimes like zinna and alcohol which was punishable either by lashing or death under Bashirs regime.

Sudanese girls use to dress in short skirts and tight jeans like that normally that was especially the case when you visited upper class neighborhoods in Bahri and Khartoum like Kafouri and Riyadh. 117 and Omak street where liberal upotias in itself especially if you visited those streets at night. You had Ethiopian hookers dressed in abayats waiting to picked up by rich Sudanese men. They usually dressed up in religious attire in order to avoid being potentially caught by the religious police and I have even heard many stories of these religious police men bribing and threatening these hookers to sleep with them for free or they would thrown them in jail if they didn't comply with their demands. There were also many underground shisha places located on those same streets where people would hold secret parties. You had upscale restaurants in Khartoum like Ozone and Spectra, where you had Sudanese girls who purposely dressed up like western ****s waiting to be picked up by some rich foreign tourist guy.

I have seen forums online where even foreign UN expats in Sudan use to boost about how easy it was for them to be able to sneak in bottles of wine back into their gated houses in Khartoum.

Sudan certaintly wasn't this ultra religious and conservative state under Bashirs government. His government allowed alot of haram filth to happen in the country during his rule.
 
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@Asaana

Why are Sudanese people acting like these things weren't going on during Bashirs regime, at least in secret per se. During his regime there was a big drug problem going on amongst the Sudanese youth.

"Bungo" is the Sudani Arabic word for weed, many of the highly educated Sudanese university students were smoking the drug in their thousands. Not to mention how easy it was to purchase alcohol and illegal drug pills from those elderly Sudanese coffee and tea sellers usually after 7pm at night in places like Nile Street(both of ones in Khartoum and Omdurman), other places like well known street markets like Soug Libya where you could find Sudanese people drinking and smoking dope even after iftar during Ramadan in Sudan.

Not sure why you mentioned the religious police in Sudan as if they properly doing their jobs when half of the time they were taking bribes from people and then letting them off the hook for crimes like zinna and alcohol which was punishable either by lashing or death under Bashirs regime.

Sudanese girls use to dress in short skirts and tight jeans like that normally that was especially the case when you visited upper class neighborhoods in Bahri and Khartoum like Kafouri and Riyadh. 117 and Omak street where liberal upotias in itself especially if you visited those streets at night. You had Ethiopian hookers dressed in abayats waiting to picked up, there were also underground shisha places located on those same streets where people would hold secret parties. You had upscale restaurants in Khartoum like Ozone and Spectra, where you had Sudanese girls who purposely dressed up like western ****s waiting to be picked up by some rich foreign tourist guy.

I have seen forums online where even foreign UN expats in Sudan use to boost about how easy it was for them to be able to sneak in bottles of wine back into their gated houses in Khartoum.

Sudan certaintly wasn't this ultra religious and conservative state under Bashirs government. His government allowed alot of haram filth to happen in the country.
This was going on during the bashir regime but it was hidden to an extent. Women dressed like this indoors but never outdoors facing the street. And the religious police could've been bribed away but lots of women, especially working class were targeted by them. Not to mention even wealthy girls were pressured to dress modestly to avoid any potential trouble but now that fear went away.

The point is the bashir era kept society at least "controlled" to an extent. The revolution made people, especially young girls crazier (twerking in public, smoking, wearing revealing clothes, drinking, etc) to the point where even liberal people that grew up during the 70s-80s are shocked by what's happening.
 

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