Mauritanian women omg

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TheMadMullah

Author: H*ejabi secrets| hate lefties
Mauritania is number one country in skin bleaching in Middle East. It is socially acceptable thing there.
Mauritania is not in the Middle East :lolbron: and why would they bleach when they already light skinned lol... I guess you meant number one in force feeding to make them grow big fuuto
:ahh:
 
Mauritania is not in the Middle East :lolbron: and why would they bleach when they already light skinned lol... I guess you meant number one in force feeding to make them grow big fuuto
:ahh:

You further proved my points that you don't know anything about them. First, Mauritania joined Arab league in 80s, their official main language is Arabic. Second, I met them in my university. And they worked and lived in gulf countries like us. Read this link about skin bleaching in Mauritania http://www.alarabiya.net/articles/2012/10/30/246742.html
 

John Michael

Free my girl Jodi!
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Nope, actually Somalis interacted and met lot of Mauritanian in gulf countries and ME. Their culture is very weird from encouraging of divorce and divorce parties, fatting camps for girls, using weirdest materials for skin bleaching. The marks of beauty to them is first divorced woman(meaning she is beautiful, desirable and wanted), single divorced woman is even better (she gets extra points for her fertility). Fat, single mother are on topic of pyramid for them. And don't forget you will have a big divorce party on your divorce day.
This can't be real. Lmao
 
@John Michael
What do desert women celebrate in their “divorce parties”?
31 March 2017
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Perhaps one of the most unusual traditions, for those who live outside desert communities, is women divorce parties. What do these women celebrate? In this story, we present the accounts of several women divorcee.



The tradition among desert peoples is ancient. A celebration follows the divorce of women. The parties themselves vary from one family to another, depending on how well they earn, but the point is still the same; to celebrate the return of a family member.



Hayat Hussaina, a divorcee, explained that “it’s a welcoming party, to show family support of the divorced woman. A divorce party sends the message to a divorced woman; she is not less appreciated, quite the contrary; families consider divorced women to be women of greater responsibilities. Her advice is more valued in family affairs, recognising her experience. Families are keen on making their daughter feel welcomed, that she’s not a burden, so she doesn’t feel that she failed something”



Talking to us about her personal experience, Hayat says “I welcomed with ululation of joy at my parents’ house, my mom and several friends of mine. They played Hassani music and gave milk and dates, and I danced with my friends.”



“Cake reads “Divorced at last!”



Hayat says parties are not made to spite divorced husbands. She says “Not at all. It’s just about sending a message to the divorced woman that she still has respect in her community, it’s not about causing embarrassment to the divorced husband, who is often from the same larger family. Honouring family ties and respect both still stand. “



Fatimtu Dah, another woman who celebrated her divorce, says “the party is a symbol of a new beginning, and indicates that the woman is ready to receive new marriage proposals, and begin a new life, especially that in desert community, men prefer marrying divorced women, because of the wisdom and experience they acquired from their previous marriage. The party, held by family and friends, is a comforting thing, it reminds the divorced woman that life does not end with the ex-husband.”



Alghalia Mgharbilha is a journalist Ayoun el Atrous city, she is a divorcee as well. Alghalia spoke to Dune Voices. On the subject, she says “they threw a little party for me, with Hassani music. We had food together, and we stayed up all night!”.



Al Qitb Takioullah, a Mauritanian desert researcher says “when a woman is divorced, she returns to her family to find them and her friends welcoming her with milk, dates and ululations of joy, encouraging her to carry on.”



Takioullah says this tradition is ancient in Mauritania, and that Mauritanian men “prefer divorced women because of their experience in marriage and selflessness”.
 

Sophisticate

Sultana of Samaroon
Staff Member
That's exactly what Cushites are, Except for Somalis and Bejas it happened much before them so our look is slightly more distinct.

I can't tell them apart from us, you posted pictures of kids which imo isn't a good example since their features aren't fully developed.



These kids are slightly older:
@Amun stated that they spoke a Cushitic language and switched to a Nilotic one. That makes quite a bit of sense since the people of Meroe initially spoke a Proto-East Cushitic language. In any case, the ancient admixture you find in Somalis cannot be replicated. And it isn't as simple as mixing a Nilote with a Semite. Somalis do not have Southern Arabian admixture, like certain Ethio-semetic speaking groups. Nor do they have genetic inflow from West/Central Africa, which for some reason is common among many contemporary Arabs, North Africans, including North Sudanese (likely owning to their heavy involvement in the Arab Slave Trade). :siilaanyolaugh: @Bahal hopes you haven't been contaminated with newer inputs. He might start including only the purist of Cushites into the club.
 
@Amun stated that they spoke a Cushitic language and switched to a Nilotic one. That makes quite a bit of sense since the people of Meroe initially spoke a Proto-East Cushitic language. In any case, the ancient admixture you find in Somalis cannot be replicated. And it isn't as simple as mixing a Nilote with a Semite. Somalis do not have Southern Arabian admixture, like certain Ethio-semetic speaking groups. Nor do they have genetic inflow from West/Central Africa, which for some reason is common among many contemporary Arabs, North Africans, including North Sudanese (likely owning to their heavy involvement in the Arab Slave Trade). :siilaanyolaugh: @Bahal hopes you haven't been contaminated with newer inputs. He might start including only the purist of Cushites into the club.
The mixture occurred thousands of years ago and involved an extinct group of Nilotes and neolithic farmers from Lebanon so technically yes the Somali mixture could never be replicated in contemporary times.

Sudan's involvement in the trans-saharan slave trade didn't affect the country's genetic makeup. Suakin was the only slave port and the slaves pretty much came and left similar to in Zeila and Mogadishu. Some Nigerian Muslims were kidnapped and enslaved while going through Sudan for Hajj but outside of Darfur Sudanis didn't mix with West/Central Africans en masse.
 

Sophisticate

Sultana of Samaroon
Staff Member
The mixture occurred thousands of years ago and involved an extinct group of Nilotes and neolithic farmers from Lebanon so technically yes the Somali mixture could never be replicated in contemporary times.

Sudan's involvement in the trans-saharan slave trade didn't affect the country's genetic makeup. Suakin was the only slave port and the slaves pretty much came and left similar to in Zeila and Mogadishu. Some Nigerian Muslims were kidnapped and enslaved while going through Sudan for Hajj but outside of Darfur Sudanis didn't mix with West/Central Africans en masse.
You mean Nilosaharan. And Lebanon. That's a little too precise. You mean Levant and that covers a wide stretch of land.

Tell me, Beja, why do Ethiopians and Somalis have 0% West/Central African Admixture, but that isn't the case for some of the North Sudanese samples I've seen. Its a bit confusing. I doubt this is the case for the insular Beja but I'm waiting on samples.:hillarybiz:
 
You mean Nilosaharan. And Lebanese. That's a little too precise. You mean Levant and that covers a wide stretch of land.

Tell me, Beja, why do Ethiopians and Somalis have 0% West/Central African Admixture, but that isn't the case for some of the North Sudanese samples I've seen. Its a bit confusing. I doubt this is the case for the insular Beja but I'm waiting on samples.:hillarybiz:
Sudan border TChad... I've seen Sudanis score 0% W/C African and some with 7% W/C African. You're comparing a country that borders 3 major African regions to 2 countries that only border 1 region.
 

Sophisticate

Sultana of Samaroon
Staff Member
Sudan border TChad... I've seen Sudanis score 0% W/C African and some with 7% W/C African. You're comparing a country that borders 3 major African regions to 2 countries that only border 1 region.
:fittytousand: Thank God I'm Somali. All I have to busy myself with is a sub clan. My heart goes out to you guys. It must be confusing to be Sudanese. :faysalwtf: Especially for the Beja, you guys maintained your Cushiticness in a sea of Arabisation.
 
:fittytousand: Thank God I'm Somali. All I have to busy myself with is a sub clan. My heart goes out to you guys. It must be confusing to be Sudanese. :faysalwtf:
No one cares about genetics in Sudan... People identify as Sudanese first and foremost and some elders still care about tribe.

I'm currently in Sudan right now and the nationalism here is intense... There's nothing to pity lol.
 

Sophisticate

Sultana of Samaroon
Staff Member
No one cares about genetics in Sudan... People identify as Sudanese first and foremost and some elders still care about tribe.

I'm currently in Sudan right now and the nationalism here is intense... There's nothing to pity lol.
That's good to hear. Pray that the only country where the formal language is Cushitic gets bitten by nationalism. We need a second coming.:siilaanyolaugh:
 
That's good to hear. Pray that the only country where the formal language is Cushitic gets bitten by nationalism. We need a second coming.:siilaanyolaugh:
Somalis seem patriotic to me.

If you're talking about anti-tribalism then that's more complex. Tribes in Northern Sudan were fairly isolated due to nile cataracts but when urbanization took place in the 1960s-70s Northerners of different tribes got together and saw how similar they looked (especially compared to Southerners) then they pretty much dropped tribes and married whomever they wanted.

People still use tribes till this day but it's nothing serious.
 

John Michael

Free my girl Jodi!
VIP
Somalis seem patriotic to me.

If you're talking about anti-tribalism then that's more complex. Tribes in Northern Sudan were fairly isolated due to nile cataracts but when urbanization took place in the 1960s-70s Northerners of different tribes got together and saw how similar they looked (especially compared to Southerners) then they pretty much dropped tribes and married whomever they wanted.

People still use tribes till this day but it's nothing serious.
I have a friend who is jaali (sp?) and I beg to differ on the tribalism thing. :tacky:

But I have to say Sudanese are about that $ wherever they are. :obama:
 
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