I have finally finalized the blueprint 2 raising a successful child in the West, here's the list

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But when she goes to her white friends party, they are going to ask her to speak somali and she will probably use it as her party trick.

'Dave come her and listen to Marian speak her little african language. Isn't it just so cute'
:whoa:
We don't know her back story.

I feel bad , we shouldn't judge people on their life choices
:bell:
@VixR it was rude of me to criticize your choices in life, forgive my insolence.We should all be able to pursue happiness in their own way
:mjkkk:
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Apollo

Staff Member
1. Move away from Somali neighborhoods ( you might be raising your child right in this neighborhood but you can't control the reckless parents around you ). Don't go too far away from Somalia tho, just keep them away at arm's length

^ They will become extremely Westernized, and a high probability of turning atheist.

From a 'non-Somali neighborhood' raised Somali.
 
It's a myth that if you grow up in a cadaan area, you lose your culture. Ciyaal suqnimo and criminality is much worse than someone that doesn't speak the language the best for example. Passion to learn more about culture can happen at any time but a criminal record indefinitely hinders prospects.

Personally, when it comes to child-rearing I think it's best to look at those around you who you admire. I have several such people I know and usually there are similar elements to their upbringing. Muslim or not it doesn't matter, there's something good to be learned from most ppl and expansive mindsets to be inspired by.
 

Gambar

VIP
It's a myth that if you grow up in a cadaan area, you lose your culture. Ciyaal suqnimo and criminality is much worse than someone that doesn't speak the language the best for example. Passion to learn more about culture can happen at any time but a criminal record indefinitely hinders prospects.

Personally, when it comes to child-rearing I think it's best to look at those around you who you admire. I have several such people I know and usually there are similar elements to their upbringing. Muslim or not it doesn't matter, there's something good to be learned from most ppl and expansive mindsets to be inspired by.
I agree. I grew up in an cadaan area, cadaan schools, the only non-cadaan kid and I didn’t even speak English when I started primary school. I picked it up fast from friends, but at home I was only allowed to speak Somali. I was able to become bicultural because of that which helps with life in general (especially getting a job).
 
I agree. I grew up in an cadaan area, cadaan schools, the only non-cadaan kid and I didn’t even speak English when I started primary school. I picked it up fast from friends, but at home I was only allowed to speak Somali. I was able to become bicultural because of that which helps with life in general (especially getting a job).

It was the same for me. My parents would drive us to the other side of the city to a Somali malcaamad for the better part of a decade and would socialise us with kids at the (Somali) mosque on weekends. At home they would only ever reply in Somali and read bedtime folklore which I loved. My siblings and I were encouraged to talk the language amongst ourselves in our younger years, even if it was terrible. This helped a lot for my old job too, no matter the nationality, I could find a way to understand most people.


PS. I'm glad to see your back sister
 

Gambar

VIP
It was the same for me. My parents would drive us to the other side of the city to a Somali malcaamad for the better part of a decade and would socialise us with kids at the (Somali) mosque on weekends. At home they would only ever reply in Somali and read bedtime folklore which I loved. My siblings and I were encouraged to talk the language amongst ourselves in our younger years, even if it was terrible. This helped a lot for my old job too, no matter the nationality, I could find a way to understand most people.


PS. I'm glad to see your back sister
I was taught malcaamad at home by my awowe since my parents didn’t want to take me to the hood to learn it especially my ayeyo (she’s dramatic though). My awowe used to make me sit on a gambar when I would read it to him. I also used to go to the local pool and park with my dad while my mum was still at work during the evenings, I learned how to skate, and I had a tutor. I was only allowed to watch max 1 hour of TV. However my parents my weren’t strict, I never wore a hijab at all. It was a choice I could make.

I wasn’t exposed to Somalis much, I was very sheltered early in life, I actually only knew Somalis through socializing later in my university days and going back home a lot. It was kind of a shock to see that they didn’t speak Somali or have a strong cultural identity and that the identity they chose was black. I also didn’t know that my family was a little bit more well off than theirs because I grew up in a neighborhood where everyone was middle class. It was only when I stepped out of that did I realize how fortunate I was (even to have both grandparents help raise me).

I think it’s extremely important as a parent to be protective over your children and know their friends. They have a huge influence over your kids.You can tell your kid no to having a cellphone but their friends are showing them and allowing them to play on their phone and they won’t tell you what theyre watching.
 
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