Female Arab singer claims to be savior to Islam

AIOPZ

Pan-Islamist
Iman Lamiri, a former contestant on the pan-Arab talent show Star Academy.

She said: "I have been chosen and I will not back down. I have evidence to prove my claims."


In a series of incoherent statements, Lamiri wrote that she has lived three lifetimes and has finally reached "internal peace". According to her statements, the singer has experienced spiritual dreams since childhood, including a dream in which she allegedly saw Prophet Muhammad. She has also faced injustice throughout her life, having been raped and having lost her father as a child.

She claims to be Al-Mahdi, who according to Shia Islam is expected to appear before the Day of Judgment.
 
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AIOPZ

Pan-Islamist
Mental illness?
She most definitely has one; I can't imagine anyone in a decent state of mind making such egregious claims as her. She swears to Allah (SWT) multiple times in the video that she is one of the signs of the Day of Judgement (entirely according to Shi'a beliefs, of course).
 
She most definitely has one; I can't imagine anyone in a decent state of mind making such egregious claims as her. She swears to Allah (SWT) multiple times in the video that she is one of the signs of the Day of Judgement (entirely according to Shi'a beliefs, of course).
She went through childhood trauma, probably evolved into a mental illness.
 

Lum

رَّبِّ زِدْنِي عِلْمًا
This is not right. May Allah (Subhanahu wa Ta'ala) guide her.
 

Lum

رَّبِّ زِدْنِي عِلْمًا
"So here is the issue that needs to be clarified:Many people use the abbreviation “SAW,” “SAWS,” or “PBUH” to fulfill this obligation in their writing. Is this something that fulfills the obligation of sending the salaah and salaam on the Messenger? Let us look now to some of the statements of the scholars regarding this practice. The Permanent Committee of Scholars in Saudi Arabia headed by ‘Abdul-‘Azeez ibn ‘Abdillaah ibn Baaz issued the following verdict when asked about the validity of abbreviating the salaah on the Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam): “The Sunnah is to write the entire phrase “sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam,” since it is a kind of supplication, and supplication is worship, (in one’s writing) just as it is in one’s speech. So to abbreviate it using the letter SAAD or the word SAAD-LAAM-‘AYN-MEEM is not a supplication nor is it worship, whether it occurs in speech or writing. For this reason, this abbreviation was not used by the the first three generations, those that the Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam) testified to their goodness.” [8] “SAAD” and “SAAD-LAAM-‘AYN-MEEM” are often used in some Arabic books. The English equivalents of these abbreviations would be: SAW, SAWS, SAAWS, PBUH, and the likes. Al-Fayrooz-Abaadee said, “It is not appropriate to use symbols or abbreviations to refer to salaah and salaam, as some of the lazy ones do, as well as some ignorant people and even some students of knowledge – they write ‘SAAD-LAAM-‘AYN-MEEM’ instead of writing ‘sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam.'” [9] Ahmad Shaakir said, “It is the absurd tradition of some of the later generations that they abbreviate the writing of ‘sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam.'” [10] Wasee Allaah ‘Abbaas said, “It is not permissible to abbreviate the salaams in general in one’s writing, just as it is not permissible to abbreviate the salaah and salaam on the Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam). It is also not permissible to abbreviate either of these in one’s speech.” [11] And Allaah knows best. May the most perfect and complete salaah and salaam be upon our beloved Messenger, and upon his noble family and companions."
FOOTNOTES [1]
written by Moosaa Richardson
 

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