The Full Historic story of the Sultanate of Harar.

Do you consider Harar a Somali city?

  • Yes

    Votes: 6 46.2%
  • No

    Votes: 7 53.8%

  • Total voters
    13

Sheikh

Jaalle Ugas ''Comrade Ugas''
VIP
Wa billahi tawfiq the Sultanate of Harar was founded and ruled by my adeer Amir Nur Mujahid AUN. He built historic walls that surround the city of Harar today. He lead all the Muslims into Jihad against the Christian Ethiopia and he won.

And he is the main reason today Somalis in Somali Galbeed aka DDSI regions believe in Islam.

Inshallah I shall visit his tomb in Harar.

And I encourage everybody to do so too.

In my opinion I consider Harar a Somali city.
The Marehan Sultanate of Harar. :obama:

@nine @Karim @Shaolin23 @TekNiKo @Creed @wars @Dheere @AarLibaax @MarehanBanker @Luna @draco @Comewithrealness @Crow

 

Sheikh

Jaalle Ugas ''Comrade Ugas''
VIP
It's also recorded Marehan, Geri Koombe, and Gadabuursi were the Somali clans that pushed out the Christians at that time period.
 
It's also recorded Marehan, Geri Koombe, and Gadabuursi were the Somali clans that pushed out the Christians at that time period.

You forgot Harti.


Somali forces contributed much to the Imām’s victories. Shihāb ad-Dīn, the Muslim chronicler of the period, writing between 1540 and 1560, mentions them frequently (Futūḥ al-Ḥabasha, ed. And trs. R. Besset Paris, 1897). The most prominent Somali groups in the campaigns were the Geri, Marrehān, and Harti – all Dārod clans. Shihāb ad-Dīn is very vague as to their distribution and grazing areas, but describes the Harti as at the time in possession of the ancient eastern port of Mait. Of the Isāq only the Habar Magādle clan seem to have been involved and their distribution is not recorded. Finally, several Dir clans also took part.




 
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Factz

Factzopedia
VIP
It's also recorded Marehan, Geri Koombe, and Gadabuursi were the Somali clans that pushed out the Christians at that time period.
You forgot Habar Magaadle and Issa.

Here is an interesting piece of Habar Magaadle history.

The first of the tribes to reach Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi were Habar Magādle of the Isaaq clan with their chieftain Ahmad Gurey Bin Hussain Al-Somali,[20] the Somali commander was noted to be one of Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi's "strongest and most able generals".[21] The Habar Magādle clan were highly appreciated and praised by the leader Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi for their bravery and loyalty.[22]
 

Sheikh

Jaalle Ugas ''Comrade Ugas''
VIP
You forgot Harti.


Somali forces contributed much to the Imām’s victories. Shihāb ad-Dīn, the Muslim chronicler of the period, writing between 1540 and 1560, mentions them frequently (Futūḥ al-Ḥabasha, ed. And trs. R. Besset Paris, 1897). The most prominent Somali groups in the campaigns were the Geri, Marrehān, and Harti – all Dārod clans. Shihāb ad-Dīn is very vague as to their distribution and grazing areas, but describes the Harti as at the time in possession of the ancient eastern port of Mait. Of the Isāq only the Habar Magādle clan seem to have been involved and their distribution is not recorded. Finally, several Dir clans also took part.
Interesting.
 
In his medieval Futuh Al-Habash documenting this campaign, the chronicler Shihāb al-Dīn indicates that 300 Harti soldiers took part in Imam Ahmad's Adal Sultanate army. He describes them as "famous among the infantry as stolid swordsmen" and "a people not given to yielding".
 

Factz

Factzopedia
VIP
@Sheikh @nine According to Lewis on Al-Futah Al-Habesh. Habar Magaadle and Marehan put the most work during the Abyssinian and Adal war.

"The Marrehan and the Habar Magadle [Magādi] also play a very prominent role (...) The text refers to two Ahmads's with the nickname 'Left-handed'. One is regularly presented as 'Ahmad Guray, the Somali' (...) identified as Ahmad Guray Xuseyn, chief of the Habar Magadle. Another reference, however, appears to link the Habar Magadle with the Marrehan. The other Ahmad is simply referred to as 'Imam Ahmad' or simply the 'Imam'.This Ahmad is not qualified by the adjective Somali (...) The two Ahmad's have been conflated into one figure, the heroic Ahmed Guray (...)"

Source: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id...mrHn1qDYAhVqCcAKHXdjDMgQ6AEILTAB#v=onepage&q="The%20text%20refers%20to%20two%20Ahmad's%20with%20the%20nickname"&f=false
 

kobe

Highly Respected
Imam Ahmad was Baalow Seexawle Karanle Hawiye

At this moment the companions of the imam screamed out, saying, ‘The infidels have tricked us; they are after the livestock,’ whereupon the imam split his forces into two divisions: one he entrusted to Garad Ahmusa, composed of the Somali spearmen of the Marraihan, the Gorgorah and the Hawiya; around one-thousand of them from among the most famous spearmen. And from the soldiers bearing shields, the same number.
Hawiye history is truly :banderas:
 
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Grant is coming to do big shuban all over this thread
Everybody knows the claim has issues or they wouldn't be expecting a shuban.. Harar was only the capital of Adal from 1520-1577. The Adal capital moved to Aussa and then disappeared. The Harari are what is left of the Harla. They have a Christian slaughterhouse, a big celebration of Ashura and a special Harari cultural festival, consisting of 24 hours of celebrations, the 8th day of the month of Shewal or Shewal Eid. Harar is the capital of the Harari Region of Ethiopia and is recognized by the UN as a World Heritage site. Jijiga is 100 km east.

http://nazret.com/blog/index.php/2007/01/25/ethiopia_is_harar_the_forgotten_city_of_

https://www.revolvy.com/topic/Adal Sultanate&item_type=topic

"During the rule of Muhammed Jasa in 1577 he transferred the capital from Harar to Aussa. The Adal Sultanate subsequently ended due to infighting with Afar tribes.[31]"

https://www.ethiopia.travel/attractions/harar-living-museum

"Another possible air gateway, Jijiga, the capital of Somali Region, lies 100km east of Harar and is also connected to Addis Ababa by daily Ethiopian Airlines flights."
  • The Sherif Harari City Museum, set in the wide-balconied double-storey mansion where Emperor Haile Selassie spent much of his childhood, hosts a superb private collection of antique Islamic manuscripts, Harari coins minted during the 18th century, traditional Harari costumes, musical instruments, and household artefacts.
  • The Arthur Rimbaud Museum is housed in the beautiful fresco-ceilinged house where its namesake poet-turned-trader reputedly lived in the late 19th century. It now functions as a museum with displays dedicated to the poet and a fascinating collection of monochrome photographs of the city taken in the late 19th and early 20th century.
  • The domed Awaach of Amir Nur, the 16th century ruler who constructed the walls around Harar Jugol, is the most important of 438 Awaach (shrines) dotted around the old town.
  • Thought to be the oldest of the city’s mosques, the modern-looking Al-Jami Mosque was reputedly founded in the 10th century and includes one minaret dating to the 1760s.
  • As dusk falls over the city, Harar’s famous Hyena men emerge to feed wild hyenas at two sites: Aw Ansar Ahmed Shrine outside Argob bari Gate and the Christian slaughterhouse outside Assumiy Bari Gate

'The usual Islamic holidays are celebrated in Harar, including Eid al-Fitr, the end of Ramadan. At the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, the first day of the month of Shewal is celebrated as Eid-al-Fitr. This is followed by six-days of fasting. The 8th day of the month of Shewal is Shewal Eid - a special Harari cultural festival, consisting of 24 hours of celebrations.

Harar comes alive during the Ashura ceremony, which takes place on the 10th day of Muharram, the first month of the Islamic calendar.

Kulubi Gebriel, on the road back towards Addis Ababa, attracts up to 100,000 Christian pilgrims on 26 July and 28 December, holy days dedicated to Kidus Gebriel (Saint Gabriel)."
 

Subeer

Men are asleep but at death they will awake!
Little is known about Hargeisa's pre-19th century history.[7] Encyclopaedia Aethiopica suggests that the settlement may have evolved in the latter half of the 1800s as a Qadiriyya settlement established by Shaykh Maddar, near a water-stop used by nomadic stock-herders on the way to the town of Harar. It thus proposes that the name "Hargeisa" was possibly derived from the sobriquet Harar as-sagir, meaning "Harar the little"[8] or simply "little Harar'"[9]

https://books.google.com/books?id=6...ved=0ahUKEwik-4morfLNAhUk1oMKHfvaDoUQ6AEIGzAA



Adds more truth to it.
:manny:
 
In the 1800s Harar had a population of around 8000 with 2500 Somalis. We formed an integral part of the history of the historic city.

We Somalis also aided Hararis when they were being persecuted by the Ethiopian government in the 1940s , Harari nationalists formed a youth club based on the SYL. They eventually merged as the notion of Somaliweyn including Harar considering how Somalis fought for the city and played in the history of the city appealed to the Harari nationalists.

So in short. It is a Harari city that's part of Soomaaliweyn
 
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In the 1800s Harar had a population of around 8000 with 2500 Somalis. We formed an integral part of the history of the historic city.

We Somalis also aided Hararis when they were being persecuted by the Ethiopian government in the 1940s , Harari nationalists formed a youth club based on the SYL. They eventually merged as the notion of Somaliweyn including Harar considering how Somalis fought for the city and played in the history of the city appealed to the Harari nationalists.

So in short. It is a Harari city that's part of Soomaaliweyn
I applaud the thought. I have always been pro-Somaliweyn, but I look at the present situation. You will notice on the map below that Harari State is completely surrounded by Oromia. It is also at elevation, above the camel lands, and the majority of the population is urban.

The most recent actual census I could find is 1994. There are not a lot of Somalis and the actual Hararis are only 7.1%. The majority are Oromo. This may have changed, but I doubt drastically.

http://www.ethiopia.gov.et/harari-r..._col_count=1&_56_INSTANCE_bUpgcyTiWxrm_page=1

"According to the 1994 census result the population is 131,139. Thepercentage share of males and females is about 50% each. Theurban residents of the State were 76,378 while its rural inhabitantswere 54,761. This State is the only member state of FDRE wherethe majority of its population lives in urban area.

The ethnic composition in the State include, Oromo 52.3%, Amhara32.6%, Harari 7.1%, and Guragies 3.2%. Harari language is the official language of the State.

According to the 1994 census result the religious composition of the population of the State indicates that 60.3% were Muslims, 38.2% Orthodox Christian, 0.9% Protestants, 0.55%Catholics, and 0.1% followers of other religious groups."

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs.../2016/03/Ethiopia-States-Map.png&action=click



In other words, Good Luck!; and get somebody besides the Russians to fund your invasion.
 
I applaud the thought. I have always been pro-Somaliweyn, but I look at the present situation. You will notice on the map below that Harari State is completely surrounded by Oromia. It is also at elevation, above the camel lands, and the majority of the population is urban.

The most recent actual census I could find is 1994. There are not a lot of Somalis and the actual Hararis are only 7.1%. The majority are Oromo. This may have changed, but I doubt drastically.

http://www.ethiopia.gov.et/harari-r..._col_count=1&_56_INSTANCE_bUpgcyTiWxrm_page=1

"According to the 1994 census result the population is 131,139. Thepercentage share of males and females is about 50% each. Theurban residents of the State were 76,378 while its rural inhabitantswere 54,761. This State is the only member state of FDRE wherethe majority of its population lives in urban area.

The ethnic composition in the State include, Oromo 52.3%, Amhara32.6%, Harari 7.1%, and Guragies 3.2%. Harari language is the official language of the State.

According to the 1994 census result the religious composition of the population of the State indicates that 60.3% were Muslims, 38.2% Orthodox Christian, 0.9% Protestants, 0.55%Catholics, and 0.1% followers of other religious groups."

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?p=map+of+the+nine+regional+state+of+ethiopia&fr=yhs-iba-1&hspart=iba&hsimp=yhs-1&imgurl=http://www.ethiopiaemb.org.cn/images/invest_1_clip_image002.gif#id=0&iurl=http://www.geocurrents.info/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Ethiopia-States-Map.png&action=click



In other words, Good Luck!; and get somebody besides the Russians to fund your invasion.

It's inevitable in my opinion that Soomaaliweyn will unite. But i agree in regards to Harar , it will be incredibly difficult other than an invasion of the city and the surrounding area to make it join Somalia.

But as we saw within Somalia in the 90s , ethnic and tribal divisions always have the ability to lead to catastrophe , and the split between Muslims and Christians within the city and in at a national level , A Muslim Somalia and a christian Ethiopia may draw Harar towards us.
 

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