Somalia has never came back after its literary collapse in the 90s

"In 1972, the first Somali alphabet, using the Latin script, was introduced, and thereafter the Somali language gradually became the official medium of instruction first in the lower and later in the higher classes. In 1974, the Siad Barre 11 regime launched a mass literacy campaign based on the new alphabet, and simultaneously embarked on the expansion of the country's education system. Underlying these developments was the common perception -- and expectation -- that the use of the Somali language was to promote the indigenisation of schooling in Somalia. As a result of these developments, the enrolment figures for primary schools rose from 28,000 in 1970 to 220,000 in 1976, and to 271,000 in 1982. Likewise, the number of primary schools increased from 287 in 1970 to 844 in 1975 and to 1407 in 1980. Further, the number of teachers reached a peak of 3,376 in 1981. In short, by 1980 some definite progress had been recorded in the primary education sector.

Soon, however, formal education in Somalia entered a period of serious decline. With most government expenditure being absorbed by military needs, only very limited funds were available to the education sector. Only 1.5% to 2% of the national budget was being allocated to education in the late 1980s. Schools started to deteriorate rapidly, as administrators and teachers sought better remuneration elsewhere. By 1990, the total number of pupils in primary schools had declined to 150,000, the number of schools had been reduced to 644 and the number of trained teachers had gone down to 611. In this deteriorating situation, the civil war broke out, during which the (formal) education system collapsed almost completely." [Mid-Decade Review of Higher Education - Case Study]

It is estimated that the literacy rate during Barre's regime was roughly 65% of the adult population. [Source: Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation; Current Education Statistics In Somalia]

This is the current literacy rate of Somalia, taken in 2015. [Source: Ministry of Education, Culture and Higher Education; Education Sector Strategic Plan (2018-2020)]

1634092918216.png


This correlates to the fact that the government has never increased its expenditure on education, dipping continuously since the early 70's. This, of course, is due to the fact that a marginalized economy makes it difficult to reinstate a public educational system.

1634093237711.png


*Somali education expenditure (1970-2018)
 

mr steal your naag

banu hashim and shiettt
VIP
"In 1972, the first Somali alphabet, using the Latin script, was introduced, and thereafter the Somali language gradually became the official medium of instruction first in the lower and later in the higher classes. In 1974, the Siad Barre 11 regime launched a mass literacy campaign based on the new alphabet, and simultaneously embarked on the expansion of the country's education system. Underlying these developments was the common perception -- and expectation -- that the use of the Somali language was to promote the indigenisation of schooling in Somalia. As a result of these developments, the enrolment figures for primary schools rose from 28,000 in 1970 to 220,000 in 1976, and to 271,000 in 1982. Likewise, the number of primary schools increased from 287 in 1970 to 844 in 1975 and to 1407 in 1980. Further, the number of teachers reached a peak of 3,376 in 1981. In short, by 1980 some definite progress had been recorded in the primary education sector.

Soon, however, formal education in Somalia entered a period of serious decline. With most government expenditure being absorbed by military needs, only very limited funds were available to the education sector. Only 1.5% to 2% of the national budget was being allocated to education in the late 1980s. Schools started to deteriorate rapidly, as administrators and teachers sought better remuneration elsewhere. By 1990, the total number of pupils in primary schools had declined to 150,000, the number of schools had been reduced to 644 and the number of trained teachers had gone down to 611. In this deteriorating situation, the civil war broke out, during which the (formal) education system collapsed almost completely." [Mid-Decade Review of Higher Education - Case Study]

It is estimated that the literacy rate during Barre's regime was roughly 65% of the adult population. [Source: Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation; Current Education Statistics In Somalia]

This is the current literacy rate of Somalia, taken in 2015. [Source: Ministry of Education, Culture and Higher Education; Education Sector Strategic Plan (2018-2020)]

View attachment 203704

This correlates to the fact that the government has never increased its expenditure on education, dipping continuously since the early 70's. This, of course, is due to the fact that a marginalized economy makes it difficult to reinstate a public educational system.

View attachment 203705

*Somali education expenditure (1970-2018)
Does it really matter? Djibouti never collapsed somehow those niggas are illiterate to:mjhaps:
 

Periplus

SYL supporter
VIP
Honestly, Somalia would have still had a high literacy rate if they had a two script system (Arabic and Latin).

Virtually everyone in the country knows how to read the quran and if the arabic script was modified to fit the somali alphabet, more people back home would be literate.

I am not saying Somali should officially adopt a two script system but they should also create a way to communicate in Somali using the Arabic script.
 
Honestly, Somalia would have still had a high literacy rate if they had a two script system (Arabic and Latin).

Virtually everyone in the country knows how to read the quran and if the arabic script was modified to fit the arabic script, more people back home would be literate.

I am not saying Somali should officially adopt a two script system but they should also create a way to communicate in Somali using the Arabic script.
I agree but some Somalis will think that would be arabfying Somalis.
 
Honestly, Somalia would have still had a high literacy rate if they had a two script system (Arabic and Latin).

Virtually everyone in the country knows how to read the quran and if the arabic script was modified to fit the somali alphabet, more people back home would be literate.

I am not saying Somali should officially adopt a two script system but they should also create a way to communicate in Somali using the Arabic script.

I don't think it would have made much of a difference. Prior to Barre's regime when the arabic script was dominant there was still only about 5% of the population that was literate. The greatest and only real factor that affects literacy is government intervention, but perhaps arabic could have helped maintain literacy due to dugsi.
 

reer

BANTUWEYNE
VIP
Honestly, Somalia would have still had a high literacy rate if they had a two script system (Arabic and Latin).

Virtually everyone in the country knows how to read the quran and if the arabic script was modified to fit the somali alphabet, more people back home would be literate.

I am not saying Somali should officially adopt a two script system but they should also create a way to communicate in Somali using the Arabic script.
see this. arabic suits double vowels better than latin.
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done.
simple alphabet.
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