Petroleum Engineering

I’m in college right now pursuing a degree in petroleum engineering (first year). It is the highest paying engineering job and their is a lack of skilled graduates within the field. Assuming that hydrocarbons aren’t going to be scrapped for another 30-40 years i could manage steady employment. But i don’t want a modest pay check, i want to exploit Somalia’s oil and gas reserves and become rich beyond belief through embezzlement of revenue and government funds. Of course i will also reinvest the embezzled funds into the local economy to enhance the quality of life. Is this way of thinking wrong?
 
Dude I have friends and know more than 20 people who graduated as Petroleum Engineering and non of them work as Petroleum engineers. Since you are first year look for more resources and base your decision on facts not what the faculty says.
 
Dude I have friends and know more than 20 people who graduated as Petroleum Engineering and non of them work as Petroleum engineers. Since you are first year look for more resources and base your decision on facts not what the faculty says.
Interesting, do you know what career paths your friends chose with the petroleum engineering degree?
 
I don’t want to sound harsh but think very, very hard about this. Find alumni of the program and talk to them. They should be available on LinkedIn and should be happy to offer some time to chat.
 
I’m in college right now pursuing a degree in petroleum engineering (first year). It is the highest paying engineering job and their is a lack of skilled graduates within the field. Assuming that hydrocarbons aren’t going to be scrapped for another 30-40 years i could manage steady employment. But i don’t want a modest pay check, i want to exploit Somalia’s oil and gas reserves and become rich beyond belief through embezzlement of revenue and government funds. Of course i will also reinvest the embezzled funds into the local economy to enhance the quality of life. Is this way of thinking wrong?
bro I heard shit is hella competitive and the demand growth for the job is hella slow
 
bro I heard shit is hella competitive and the demand growth for the job is hella slow
From what i gathered on the web, there are only 17,000 petroleum engineers in the US, In 2018 only 2000 petroleum engineers graduated within the whole year, additionally only 3000 graduates were forecasted to graduate within the following three years. Plus i believe that a petroleum engineering degree can also act in the place of a mechanical engineering degree. The thing that scares me is that the hydrocarbon industry is very hit or miss, from record highs industrial growth and fat paychecks to being realeased from your job because oil prices crashed. I hate inconsistency. And yeah it probably will be very difficult in the academic sense.
 
From what i gathered on the web, there are only 17,000 petroleum engineers in the US, In 2018 only 2000 petroleum engineers graduated within the whole year, additionally only 3000 graduates were forecasted to graduate within the following three years. Plus i believe that a petroleum engineering degree can also act in the place of a mechanical engineering degree. The thing that scares me is that the hydrocarbon industry is very hit or miss, from record highs industrial growth and fat paychecks to being realeased from your job because oil prices crashed. I hate inconsistency. And yeah it probably will be very difficult in the academic sense.

You never know what the future holds. When I was studying engineering the industry I am in was going through a down turn. When I graduated it was in a boom, a boom that would probably last another 10 years. Who knows what Somalia will be like in 20 years. Personally I wouldn't base my decision on this.

As long you think you will be reasonably happy in this profession its probably worth pursuing it. Keep in mind you will never enjoy everything about any job.

Another thing to think about is where you would end up working. A lot of mining/oil & gas work is done on sites in the middle of nowhere. Perhaps this is something you wouldn't want to do.

Anyways, all the best. :)
 
I’m in college right now pursuing a degree in petroleum engineering (first year). It is the highest paying engineering job and their is a lack of skilled graduates within the field. Assuming that hydrocarbons aren’t going to be scrapped for another 30-40 years i could manage steady employment. But i don’t want a modest pay check, i want to exploit Somalia’s oil and gas reserves and become rich beyond belief through embezzlement of revenue and government funds. Of course i will also reinvest the embezzled funds into the local economy to enhance the quality of life. Is this way of thinking wrong?
Alot of people are going to talk about how "oil isn't going anywhere" and "we'll be using oil for decades", which is technically true, but I think as soon as Electric Cars takes off (and I think we're at the point where it's more than 10 years away), oil is going to go into a steep decline because passenger cars are such a large part of the demand. Oil is very supply/demand sensitive: a demand reduction of a few percent can send prices tumbling and knock out lots of marginal producers. Once an industry is in decline, investment dries up pretty quick. The low cost producers like the middle east will still be around just because they can profitably pump for so low, but the higher cost producers are going to have an extremely tough time. Gas will be around for a while longer because we need it to balance renewables, but I see the same thing: if someone can figure out low cost storage, demand will dry up pretty quick.

One analogy I would use is coal: coal will also be around for several decades still, but no one in their right mind would try to get into it now, because it clearly has no future.

Ultimately if you still want to get into this field, try to stick with some aspect that will can transfer over to other industries. Or just go into tech. It's a growing field that pays well and had good job growth.
 
Alot of people are going to talk about how "oil isn't going anywhere" and "we'll be using oil for decades", which is technically true, but I think as soon as Electric Cars takes off (and I think we're at the point where it's more than 10 years away), oil is going to go into a steep decline because passenger cars are such a large part of the demand. Oil is very supply/demand sensitive: a demand reduction of a few percent can send prices tumbling and knock out lots of marginal producers. Once an industry is in decline, investment dries up pretty quick. The low cost producers like the middle east will still be around just because they can profitably pump for so low, but the higher cost producers are going to have an extremely tough time. Gas will be around for a while longer because we need it to balance renewables, but I see the same thing: if someone can figure out low cost storage, demand will dry up pretty quick.

One analogy I would use is coal: coal will also be around for several decades still, but no one in their right mind would try to get into it now, because it clearly has no future.

Ultimately if you still want to get into this field, try to stick with some aspect that will can transfer over to other industries. Or just go into tech. It's a growing field that pays well and had good job growth.
my older sister is in tech right now (computer science) she’s doing an internship currently. I know a lot of fellow students in the tech field, and theirs a lot of graduates attaining a degree in tech or a degree heavily related to tech, isn’t the field gonna become over saturated and jobs limited? (when i say tech i mean software engineering, computer science, cyber security, and all the other similar ones)
 
my older sister is in tech right now (computer science) she’s doing an internship currently. I know a lot of fellow students in the tech field, and theirs a lot of graduates attaining a degree in tech or a degree heavily related to tech, isn’t the field gonna become over saturated and jobs limited? (when i say tech i mean software engineering, computer science, cyber security, and all the other similar ones)
i doubt it will become over saturated, they’re in demand more than ever. the people that say it’s over saturated want to gatekeep.
 
also don’t get advice from people on the internet. they don’t know anything about you. it’s best to go to an advisor and do what you think is right for you. don’t be caught up with “ is this field going to exist in blah blah years” at the end of the day if it’s something you like just go for it. adding on, just bc you have a degree in a specific field doesn’t mean you’re forced to work in that field.
 
I was thinking of pairing the petroleum engineering degree with a mechanical engineering degree to attain an element of versatility, However a degree in tech is looking more and more better by the day.
This is brilliant as you will understand how to manufacture systems to extract the oil, also Geology is one subject we should teach all Somalis because we live in a desert and need water, and of course mining for resource is secondary but necessary for industry and industrialization
 
You could do it bro but make your intention to help , teach and implement not to defraud, those who defraud ultimately only defraud theirselves . Islam teach us that
 
This is brilliant as you will understand how to manufacture systems to extract the oil, also Geology is one subject we should teach all Somalis because we live in a desert and need water, and of course mining for resource is secondary but necessary for industry and industrialization
Geology really is vital, water is a very scarce resource and aquifers cannot sustain a growing population of 15 million, we need to invest in desalination and cultivate our mining sector to unlock latent economic growth.
 
They say that petroleum engineering is a dying field. More versatile majors are always better than niche majors. I'm planning on majoring in chemical doing environmental as a minor (or perhaps a second major). You can work in the petroleum industry as a chemical engineering major.
 

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