Diabetes in the Somali Community

Discussion in 'Health & Advice' started by Idil-Beydaan, Feb 28, 2018.

  1. Idil-Beydaan

    Idil-Beydaan

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    In May 2002 the Associated Press reported on a statement made by Dr. Mehmood Khan, a consultant in the Mayo Clinic’s Division of Endocrinology that “a growing number of Somali immigrants are developing [Type 2 diabetes] within five years, and some as quickly as six months, after their arrival in this country.” Dr. Khan attributed the phenomenon to a lack of exercise and a dramatic increase in fat and calories experienced by Somali immigrants (Associated Press, 2002).

    In Seattle, a medical librarian reported that some of the young Somali men who came to the library expressed concern about diabetes. They had observed that many young men like themselves have been diagnosed and reported that some think it is just American medicine making up diseases and so they don't take the diagnosis seriously. Similarly, men in the diabetes project thought that people with diabetes are not “really sick.”

    During a discussion among a half dozen Somali women participating in a review of education materials about diabetes, one woman stated that problems such as asthma, diabetes, and sleeping disorders were not common (in Somalia), and that she had never heard of diabetes occurring in anyone except old people in Somalia. In addition, the women in this project believed that diabetes happens more in the U.S. because in Somalia farmers sweat and are very active. They define the disease as one which causes tiredness, sleepiness, frequent urination and for which there is no cure. They did not believe that diabetes is a genetic disease for it is God who determines its occurrence. The women understood that the diabetes medicine comes from the doctors, but that God dictates whether or not the medicine will help. Most of the women knew what type of diabetes they had.***
    *
    https://ethnomed.org/clinical/diabe...on-and-recommendations-for-diabetes-educators
    Diabetes in the Somali community in Norway
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4897676/
    Minnesota
    http://masons.umn.edu/research/diabetes-somali-community
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2018
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  2. Idil-Beydaan

    Idil-Beydaan

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  3. Idil-Beydaan

    Idil-Beydaan

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    Why is Type 2 diabeties prevalent among Somalis
     
  4. Xaagi-Cagmadigtee

    Xaagi-Cagmadigtee Guul ama Dhimasho

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    Bad diet and sedentary life.
     
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  5. Idil-Beydaan

    Idil-Beydaan

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    Excellent point
    I don’t think Somalis are willing to abandon Bariis iyo baasto
    So what do you think can be done to change our diet?
     
  6. Xaagi-Cagmadigtee

    Xaagi-Cagmadigtee Guul ama Dhimasho

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    Don't totally eliminate baris iyo baasto or any other Somali diet, but eat it in moderation and exercise. Incorporate more fruits, vegetables and fiber in the diet as well. Don't smoke or do drugs including eating qat. Go for your yearly check up if you live in the West or can afford it elsewhere. You will add years to your life. Lifestyle changes do wonders.
     
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  7. Xaagi-Cagmadigtee

    Xaagi-Cagmadigtee Guul ama Dhimasho

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    I am glad you brought this up. Another prevalent yet curable at the early stages is
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    If you or your spouse/significant other is exposed, ensure your child is vaccinated.
     
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  8. Idil-Beydaan

    Idil-Beydaan

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    Yess
    Hepatitis is also prevalent with somalis:9uoofqd:
    I know lots of older people that get dialysis’s and it’s painful :frdfvsb:
    Thanks for the advice
     
  9. Idil-Beydaan

    Idil-Beydaan

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    I know of quite a few families that have bariis with meat only. Whereas they can add some veg or even have rice with fish. Qat is banned now. Good advices:nvjpqts:
     
  10. MariaMaria

    MariaMaria Education, Peace and Prosperity

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    Somali cuisine is soo unhealthy. Most dishes contain meat and too oily/too salty/too sugary

    And don't get me started in xalwa:jaynerd: it's literally just sugar and oil.

    I've started to cook vegan and vegetarian dishes for my mum because her health was getting soo bad.
     
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  11. Jaalle Halfdan

    Jaalle Halfdan There is no easy way out of the Badlands

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    Cagaarshow is not that prevalent anymore i haven't heard of someone that has Cagaarshow in a longtime.
     
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  12. Suspect

    Suspect

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    Our diet consist of alot of sugar and carbs with little fruit & veg and moderate protein while it should be alot of veg and little sugar/carb.
     
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  13. lone

    lone Jesus Christ is my Lord & Saviour

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    Amputations are the worst. Folk look like zombies after losing extremities.

    Poor folk are more likely to get it due to so many factors.
     
  14. Yusra Luuza

    Yusra Luuza

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    We need to avoid sugar and refined/processed food like a plague. 110% I believe they are one cause diabetes and obesity.
    Not basto and baris. They both low gi. However we have to eat them with moderation. They still spike blood sugar in blood but not as much as sugar and plain flour or processed food.
    Also we need to avoid high level fruits like banana and dates.
     
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