Children with active fathers have higher IQ levels

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Children who spend time with their fathers have a higher IQ​

Children who spend large amounts of time with their fathers have higher IQs, according to a new study.





“Children who spend large amounts of time with their fathers have higher IQs,” The Daily Telegraphreported. It said that, according to a new study, fatherly involvement in a child’s early life can also affect their career prospects. The Daily Mail also covered the story and said the study suggests that fathers who take a more active role have children that grow up to be more intelligent and climb higher up the social ladder.

This was a long-term study that followed 11,000 British men and women since their birth in 1958. While the study has some strengths in that it involved a large number of people over many years, it has several limitations. These mostly relate to how the information on fatherly involvement was initially collected, and certain measures that were not taken, such as independent measures of motherly involvement. The information on the father’s involvement was captured in 1969, and how applicable these findings are to today’s style of parenting is questionable. Intelligence is reliant on a variety of genetic and environmental factors.


Where did the story come from?​

Daniel Nettle from the Centre for Behaviour and Evolution, Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University, carried out this research. No sources of funding were reported in the journal article. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal, Evolution and Human Behaviour.

What kind of scientific study was this?​

The author of this cohort study said that previous research has indicated that fathers become more involved with sons than with daughters, and that fathers in higher socioeconomic groups spend more time with their children than those of lower socioeconomic groups. The author wanted to investigate whether the amount of contact between father and child influences child outcomes. Specific attention was given to whether socioeconomic status and child gender influences fatherly involvement, and whether the level of involvement affects child IQ and social mobility. Possible reasons for this were explored.

The author used data from the National Child Development Study, an ongoing investigation of all 17,146 children born in the UK in a single week in March 1958 and their parents. The participants have received regular assessments over the past 50 years, most recently in 2004-5 at the age of 46. This particular study used data collected in 1965, 1969, 1974, 2000 and the most recent assessment in 2004-05. The number of participants varied at each assessment time, ranging from 10,979 to 15,051. Paternal involvement was principally assessed in 1969 when the children were about 11 years old. Mothers were asked about levels of fatherly involvement with possible responses of ‘inapplicable’, ‘leaves it to mother’, ‘significant but less than mother’, or ‘equal to mother’. When this data was cross-checked with other data from the cohort period, it was found that in 86% of cases the response ‘inapplicable’ referred to the father not living in the household with the child.

Socioeconomic status was assessed using a system of five occupational classes common in British National Statistics (I = professional through to V = unskilled). Social mobility was assessed by comparing the child’s social class in 2000 with that of the father in 1958. The IQ measure was a general ability (GA) score taken at age 11 (details of assessment not given in this report), which is said to have high validity with educational and occupational attainment. The researcher looked at relationships between GA score and paternal involvement, including other variables such as number of brothers and sisters.

What were the results of the study?​

Level of paternal involvement varied by socioeconomic class, with 65% of class I fathers spending an ‘equal to mother’ amount of time with the child compared to 59% of class V fathers. Fathers who ‘left it to mother’ increased from 4% in class I to 14% in class V. If a child was a girl, they had significantly increased odds that their father would be in a category other than ‘equal to mother’. Odds also increased with each additional brother in the family, i.e. ‘greater numbers of siblings were associated with lower paternal involvement’. Overall, fathers invested more time with the child when they were of higher socioeconomic status, when the child was a boy, and when there were fewer children in the household.

As expected, IQ at 11 varied with child sex (girls scoring higher than boys), number of brothers and sisters (more siblings associated with lower score), and the father’s social class (higher class associated with higher IQ). The father’s role at age 11 also had an effect on IQ, with greater involvement associated with higher IQ. There was also an interaction between the father’s role and their social class, with greater paternal involvement having a larger effect on IQ when the father was of a higher social class.

There was also a significant effect of paternal involvement on their offspring’s social mobility (at age 42 years), with those who received more fatherly involvement more likely to increase social class (in addition to other expected patterns, e.g. males being more socially mobile than females, more siblings associated with less mobility). The author then goes on to discuss the psychology and social patterns that influence fatherly involvement.

What interpretations did the researchers draw from these results?​

The author concludes that the study has demonstrated that increased paternal involvement positively influences the child’s IQ at age 11 and their level of social mobility at the age of 42. There was also an effect of socioeconomic status, with fathers of higher socioeconomic status spending more time with their children. It was also found that fathers of higher socioeconomic status who had more contact with their children had greater influence on the child’s IQ than fathers of lower socioeconomic status who spent equivalent amounts of time with their children. There were no differences seen between sons and daughters in terms of the effect that their father’s time had on them.

What does the NHS Knowledge Service make of this study?​

This study has detected interesting patterns between fatherly involvement and child’s IQ. However the study has some important limitations:

  • This study relied on the mothers’ perspectives of the fathers’ involvement and only measured this once in 1969. There are three problems: firstly, the mothers’ responses may have been inaccurate. Secondly, a single assessment made on one day is unlikely to be representative of the entire duration of the child’s upbringing. Thirdly, the results cannot be easily generalised to present day parenting. The level of contact and type of relationship that today’s children have with their fathers may be quite different from the norm in the 1950s and 60s. Forty to 50 years ago it was more common for a mother to stay at home with the children and for her to take a dominant role in bringing up children while the father went to work. Today, roles are more equal.
  • Mother’s were only given a limited number of responses for the question on how involved the fathers were in their child’s upbringing. The responses will have been highly individual and will not mean the same thing from one family to the next. For example, ‘equal to mother’ could mean that the child was receiving high levels of attention from both of their parents. However, the same response could also be used if both parents were working full time and were both giving the child less attention.
  • It cannot be assumed that it is only contact with the father that has an effect, or whether the same would be seen with any supportive male role model. It is also not possible to say whether it has to be a male at all, as the amount of time that the child spent with the mother or other adult females was not assessed. The questionnaire only compared the father’s involvement with that of the mother’s. If it had also directly measured the mother’s involvement then greater confidence could be had in this study.
  • The effects of other factors such as the parents’ education, schooling, peer groups, disruptive life events or medical comorbidity and school absence were not investigated. The level of intelligence and professional career that a child develops depends on a wide range of factors, including genetics, education, peer group, and the home and external environment in which they grow up.
 
Takes two responsible parents to raise a kid right.


Two active parents, can even save kids from lower-socio economic neighbourhood issues. Because they keep their children engaged in learning or scheduled/supervised play-time. I know parents, that secretly followed their teen sons to the parks, and kept an eye out. I see, it with these religious/organised families, that live in rough neighbourhods, but their schedule is jam-packed.

If you don't make plans for your kids, shaytaan will plan for them.
 

Kisame

Plotting world domination
Stats like this make you realize a lot of Somali men were destined for failure in the west.
 

Tiyeglow

A Laandheere always pays his debts
Stats like this make you realize a lot of Somali men were destined for failure in the west.
The issue of fatherlessness is probably *the* most pressing issue in Somalia today in my opinion, yes it is intimately linked to Khat, poverty, civil war, etc. But this very issue is so pervasive, I was so shocked you see so many homes with Hoyooyin only, its the direct cause of a civil war however I genuinely worry for the future generation, the behaviour of a fatherless child is irratic and detrimental.

In the West at least there are ways to mitigate this ie meritocratic system. I've seen many in my community who have gone on to finish a degree, get a job and start a family in spite of being without a father. But Somalia, there destine is pretty much set (fatherless son becomes an askaari or just a khat addict dead beat, daughter has multiple kids with different fathers - sounding so so much like the AA community subhanallah).
 
The issue of fatherlessness is probably *the* most pressing issue in Somalia today in my opinion, yes it is intimately linked to Khat, poverty, civil war, etc. But this very issue is so pervasive, I was so shocked you see so many homes with Hoyooyin only, its the direct cause of a civil war however I genuinely worry for the future generation, the behaviour of a fatherless child is irratic and detrimental.

In the West at least there are ways to mitigate this ie meritocratic system. I've seen many in my community who have gone on to finish a degree, get a job and start a family in spite of being without a father. But Somalia, there destine is pretty much set (fatherless son becomes an askaari or just a khat addict dead beat, daughter has multiple kids with different fathers - sounding so so much like the AA community subhanallah).


I don't think it is the civil war. The hands-off approach always existed. Especially for those odays that had multiple families, they genuinely believe child rearing is a woman's job. The difference was, at least we were in our own country and people helped each other out to geg jobs etc. In the west, you are pretty much on your own, or are being sabotaged/discriminated against.
 

Tiyeglow

A Laandheere always pays his debts
I don't think it is the civil war. The hands-off approach always existed. Especially for those odays that had multiple families, they genuinely believe child rearing is a woman's job. The difference was, at least we were in our own country and people helped each other out to geg jobs etc. In the west, you are pretty much on your own, or are being sabotaged/discriminated against.
The oft-repeated proverb: "It takes a village to raise a child"
 
Makes a lot of sense. Because it is natural for a man and woman to make a child and thus it’s ideal for both to raise them. Just like how plant based food grown from the earth is the best food for us. The answers are right under our noses but humans gonna human
 
The issue of fatherlessness is probably *the* most pressing issue in Somalia today in my opinion, yes it is intimately linked to Khat, poverty, civil war, etc. But this very issue is so pervasive, I was so shocked you see so many homes with Hoyooyin only, its the direct cause of a civil war however I genuinely worry for the future generation, the behaviour of a fatherless child is irratic and detrimental.


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@𐒁𐒚𐒒𐒂𐒘𐒂𐒗 𐒎𐒚𐒗𐒗𐒒


It’s always been normalized in Somali culture. Simply look at the gender dynamics back home and the centering of the nuclear family isn’t the norm as well culturally. I’ll explain:

Even within marriages, child rearing is seen as exclusively a woman’s job. The man is out of the house the whole day and his job is to merely father the children and give the wife the bill for the home at night when he comes home. That’s it. Husband and wives don’t even socialize during the day like that back home. Somali culture is incredibly segregated. During the day the wife is with the kids and her female family members and even friends/neighbors the whole day.
During the day, regardless of the husband’s work status as even the unemployed who rely on remittance abroad expected to be outside the whole day with friends and male family members. If you’ve noticed Somalis are big extroverts and both sexes heavily reply on friendships and family members outside of the nuclear family.


I’m not blaming men here since even the women themselves don’t know any better. If they see their sons or brothers ect helping at home and spending a lot of time with the wife and kids, the women themselves would accuse their daughter in law or sister in law with sixir and think their sons behavior is weird and unmanly. In fact when I was back home the biggest drivers of this were in fact the mothers who would go out of their way to keep this tradition alive. Some of my cousins didn’t work and had nothing to do but were forbidden from helping the women and even cleaning after themselves was seen as weird. They were expected to be outside the house, God knows doing what tbh since they didn’t have jobs and only studied in the morning but would come after Maghrib. Another unusual thing I saw back home was that men who went shopping for the family to buy groceries like vegetables ect were mocked. Going to the market was seen as women’s job. So even tasks outside of the home are sometimes seen as women’s job as well. I think the exception was the fish market since it’s heavily male dominated but most families wouldn’t have fish often.

There was this funny story of a father back home visiting his daughter. He saw his son-in law changing his grandson’s diapers. The father of the wife was so disturbed that he told his daughter that her husband isn’t a real man and that he’d support her if she wanted to leave😭. I don’t know how true this story is but after spending time back home, I wouldn’t be surprised.

Somali society isn’t nuclear family friendly. It’s simply the daqan so of course people with that culture aren’t going to get good results in a society is based upon the nuclear family of mum and dad helping each other to raise the kids. Back home women rely on other women to raise the kids, in the West, you reply on the man that married you.
 
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@𐒁𐒚𐒒𐒂𐒘𐒂𐒗 𐒎𐒚𐒗𐒗𐒒


It’s always been normalized in Somali culture. Simply look at the gender dynamics back home and the centering of the nuclear family isn’t the norm as well culturally. I’ll explain:

Even within marriages, child rearing is seen as exclusively a woman’s job. The man is out of the house the whole day and his job is to merely father the children and give the wife the bill for the home at night when he comes home. That’s it. Husband and wives don’t even socialize during the day like that back home. Somali culture is incredibly segregated. During the day the wife is with the kids and her female family members and even friends/neighbors the whole day.
During the day, regardless of the husband’s work status as even the unemployed who rely on remittance abroad expected to be outside the whole day with friends and male family members. If you’ve noticed Somalis are big extroverts and both sexes heavily reply on friendships and family members outside of the nuclear family.


I’m not blaming men here since even the women themselves don’t know any better. If they see their sons or brothers ect helping at home and spending a lot of time with the wife and kids, the women themselves would accuse their daughter in law or sister in law with sixir and think their sons behavior is weird and unmanly. In fact when I was back home the biggest drivers of this were in fact the mothers who would go out of their way to keep this tradition alive. Some of my cousins didn’t work and had nothing to do but were forbidden from helping the women and even cleaning after themselves was seen as weird. They were expected to be outside the house, God knows doing what tbh since they didn’t have jobs and only studied in the morning but would come after Maghrib. Another unusual thing I saw back home was that men who went shopping for the family to buy groceries like vegetables ect were mocked. Going to the market was seen as women’s job. So even tasks outside of the home are sometimes seen as women’s job as well. I think the exception was the fish market since it’s heavily male dominated but most families wouldn’t have fish often.

There was this funny story of a father back home visiting his daughter. He saw his son-in law changing his grandson’s diapers. The father of the wife was so disturbed that he told his daughter that her husband isn’t a real man and that he’d support her if she wanted to leave😭. I don’t know how true this story is but after spending time back home, I wouldn’t be surprised.

Somali society isn’t nuclear family friendly. It’s simply the daqan so of course people with that culture aren’t going to get good results in a society is based upon the nuclear family of mum and dad helping each other to raise the kids. Back home women rely on other women to raise the kids, in the West, you reply on the man that married you.

Oh 100%. My dad told me another funny story about a man who went back to home to marry. Living in the West he was used to making his own meals or just fetching a snack from the kitchen, so after he got married he popped in the kitchen one day as usual to make himself something to eat. His wife walked in on him and had a whole break down. Apparently she ran from the house screaming she married an effeminate man who enters the kitchen. 😭
 
Oh 100%. My dad told me another funny story about a man who went back to home to marry. Living in the West he was used to making his own meals or just fetching a snack from the kitchen, so after he got married he popped in the kitchen one day as usual to make himself something to eat. His wife walked in on him and had a whole break down. Apparently she ran from the house screaming she married an effeminate man who enters the kitchen. 😭
Yep, I believe it even the women are weirdos. The story of the father visiting his daughter was so funny to me. Like he wasn’t even happy that his daughter has a loving man helping her. He thought instead that his daughter married a weirdo and wanted to take his daughter back home to protect her 😂😂😂, like how can you expect these people to survive in the West when this is their thought process?? Supposedly in the story the abo is fully saying it’s okay you can come home, just because her man is changing diapers and in your story the wife is running traumatized 😂.

But for me, the weirdest aspect is the lack of proper family time. I hardly saw families going out as a unit. Men simply hang out with other men like friends and prioritize them and women hang out with their kids, female family and female friends. The importance of the nuclear family is 0 for them and the men will prioritize going to the cafe with Abdi his friend over going to the park with his children. For me that’s the saddest part. People can come for the West destroying families as much as they want, but if we’re being honest, it’s the West that has taught Somalis the importance of family unity and being together. You find it’s younger generation men and women raised in the West who go out together as a family and even back home it’s the TikTok generation who want to go out together and do stuff with the husband, wife and kids.

Tbh things are slowly changing because when I was back home the younger generation of women were kinda waking up because of TikTok and I did see some of my female cousins being a bit resentful that they had to help the maid and actually cook and clean whilst their brothers do nothing since now women are also encouraged to go Uni. A cousin of mine was saying that she thought it was unfair that at Uni the boys had more time to complete work and projects since they had no outside pressures ect which meant it was easier for them to get higher marks.
 
Yep, I believe it even the women are weirdos. The story of the father visiting his daughter was so funny to me. Like he wasn’t even happy that his daughter has a loving man helping her. He thought instead that his daughter married a weirdo and wanted to take his daughter back home to protect her 😂😂😂, like how can you expect these people to survive in the West when this is their thought process?? Supposedly in the story the abo is fully saying it’s okay you can come home, just because her man is changing diapers and in your story the wife is running traumatized 😂.

But for me, the weirdest aspect is the lack of proper family time. I hardly saw families going out as a unit. Men simply hang out with other men like friends and prioritize them and women hang out with their kids, female family and female friends. The importance of the nuclear family is 0 for them and the men will prioritize going to the cafe with Abdi his friend over going to the park with his children. For me that’s the saddest part. People can come for the West destroying families as much as they want, but if we’re being honest, it’s the West that has taught Somalis the importance of family unity and being together. You find it’s younger generation men and women raised in the West who go out together as a family and even back home it’s the TikTok generation who want to go out together and do stuff with the husband, wife and kids.

Tbh things are slowly changing because when I was back home the younger generation of women were kinda waking up because of TikTok and I did see some of my female cousins being a bit resentful that they had to help the maid and actually cook and clean whilst their brothers do nothing since now women are also encouraged to go Uni. A cousin of mine was saying that she thought it was unfair that at Uni the boys had more time to complete work and projects since they had no outside pressures ect which meant it was easier for them to get higher marks.

It's sad. I've noticed this too. You see other Muslim demographics (e.g., Asians and Arabs) that see the value of family, always doing activities together; picnics, barbecues, going to family resorts etc., you dont really see this with Somalis, particularly the older gen. I remember spending Eid in an Arab country and all you'd see is Arab families heading out together, eating out or going to the beach, families everywhere. The Somali girls from the neighbourhood came to spend it with us, one of them her dad was a taxi driver and he was working that day.
 

onEdge

Recovering from humiliation kink.
Yep, I believe it even the women are weirdos. The story of the father visiting his daughter was so funny to me. Like he wasn’t even happy that his daughter has a loving man helping her. He thought instead that his daughter married a weirdo and wanted to take his daughter back home to protect her 😂😂😂, like how can you expect these people to survive in the West when this is their thought process?? Supposedly in the story the abo is fully saying it’s okay you can come home, just because her man is changing diapers and in your story the wife is running traumatized 😂.

But for me, the weirdest aspect is the lack of proper family time. I hardly saw families going out as a unit. Men simply hang out with other men like friends and prioritize them and women hang out with their kids, female family and female friends. The importance of the nuclear family is 0 for them and the men will prioritize going to the cafe with Abdi his friend over going to the park with his children. For me that’s the saddest part. People can come for the West destroying families as much as they want, but if we’re being honest, it’s the West that has taught Somalis the importance of family unity and being together. You find it’s younger generation men and women raised in the West who go out together as a family and even back home it’s the TikTok generation who want to go out together and do stuff with the husband, wife and kids.

Tbh things are slowly changing because when I was back home the younger generation of women were kinda waking up because of TikTok and I did see some of my female cousins being a bit resentful that they had to help the maid and actually cook and clean whilst their brothers do nothing since now women are also encouraged to go Uni. A cousin of mine was saying that she thought it was unfair that at Uni the boys had more time to complete work and projects since they had no outside pressures ect which meant it was easier for them to get higher marks.
Gen z is going to be different I think. I have seen so many faraxs helps their wives. The younger generation is also more interested in love relationship than arranged marriage.
People are getting married to their former schoolmates as well.
It's all because of social media and western movies. Not just the somali but madow too.
I have started seeing gen z parents and how they treat their children is very different. I have seen them hugging them kissing them in public. Showing them affection. Some are following gaal culture and kissing their children in the mouth 🤢.
I have been called to mediate divorces among young somali couples. Most of them fight of their children. Each parent wants to keep the children.
It surprised me since older Somali men would never fight for their children lol.
 
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