Are more clans becoming agricultural?

convincation

Ciyaal mahaday
I noticed that farms are starting to pop up all over Somalia specifically the south in places were there used to be no farms, are more clans becoming agricultural or are the same clans just “breeding like rabbits”
 
More people probably making the shift. Some of my own relatives are involved with projects in Puntland and Somaliland that work to help pastoralists, agro-pastoralists and traditional farmers make a full shift toward being settled, modernized farmers. They've succeeded in shifting over a lot of people over the years.

Personally, I'd also push them toward more regenerative ranching and farming like rotational grazing, more perennial or perennial mixed cropping and techniques like crop rotation. Make Somalia an organic, locally grown food superpower, saxiibs.
 

convincation

Ciyaal mahaday
More people probably making the shift. Some of my own relatives are involved with projects in Puntland and Somaliland that work to help pastoralists, agro-pastoralists and traditional farmers make a full shift toward being settled, modernized farmers. They've succeeded in shifting over a lot of people over the years.

Personally, I'd also push them toward more regenerative ranching and farming like rotational grazing, more perennial or perennial mixed cropping and techniques like crop rotation. Make Somalia an organic, locally grown food superpower, saxiibs.
Isn’t the north pretty dry compared to the south? Shouldn’t all the farmers ideally move to the south where the land is better?
 

Alexis

Haplogroup T activist.
Isn’t the north pretty dry compared to the south? Shouldn’t all the farmers ideally move to the south where the land is better?
Generally true for most of SL yes, however the Southwestern territories (Borama, Gabiley and parts of southern Hargeisa) are more than fit for farming. Sorghum, corn and common fruits/vegetables are grown locally. Most of the tribes inhabiting those lands are farmers as well as cattle and camel herders. It is also true for most of west DDSI.
But obviously, the nature of the land is very different from southern Somalia’s riverine states. I guess you won’t see the same type of farms there.
 

DalsanJubiland

HartilandWaamoJoore
you can farm anywhere in Somalia
As long as you have ground water
In fact northern Somalia starting from Mogadishu up north have fertile land then the south, north soil is more fertile and better then south, but you need good ground water.
South has a lot water , but most places the soil is not good too acidic.
When I was growing up in Jubada Hoose we used have farm , used grow corn, maize and sesame.
Also we had bakaar to put crops under ground.
We also had cattle’s ,(cowes), sheeps and goats and chickens
Farming is hard work not easy.
 

Yahya

VIP
2020 GRANDMASTER
It's mainly diaspora that are investing in farm lands and introducing their cousins back home to the practice, alhamdulillah. It's a trend in somaliland and puntland and soon in the near future desertification will be a thing of the past in north somalia. South somalia has tons of farmland that is currently in use.

I myself am farming in sanaag but i haven't decided which crops to grow yet. I'm still testing out different crops and rotating them yearly.
 
During a drought in in the mid 70's my dad and his family were transported by the government on planes from Sool to Jubbada Hoose to become farmers in the South.

It's not impossible that this shift will happen all over Somalia as global warming speeds up and droughts become much more common in the already dry north.
 
less people are going to work in agriculture (both crops and raising animals) in the future in Somalia as it gets mechanised. so more people are going to become urbanised instead of becoming farmers like in developed countries.

for example, USA, less than 2% engage in agricultural activities.
 

Aurelian

Forza Somalia!
VIP
It's mainly diaspora that are investing in farm lands and introducing their cousins back home to the practice, alhamdulillah. It's a trend in somaliland and puntland and soon in the near future desertification will be a thing of the past in north somalia. South somalia has tons of farmland that is currently in use.

I myself am farming in sanaag but i haven't decided which crops to grow yet. I'm still testing out different crops and rotating them yearly.
How you gonna get the water, drilling? If wheels can sustain farmland then how there water shortages in North Somalia?
 
In the future, as we see a sizable economic growth, the total production output from farms and livestock that we traditionally consider 'agriculture' will make up less of the total GDP. There will be an effective change in dealing with such production for more quality, using less energy, better farming techniques, use of more modern technology, and for both livestock selling and farming, better organization infrastructure. Even if this will undoubtedly happen, the GDP share will still shrink as Somalis become increasingly urbanized, and other economic sectors will grow.

All in all, we want to improve on the agricultural aspect because there is a large room for growth for farming yields so the people can feed themselves, be less reliant on import when push comes to shove, but it will not be the most important thing when accounting for total country-wide economic output shares. There is a typical trend where poor countries' economic profiles are dominated by this component, but as they improve and grow, you can see it play a notably lower role. All developed countries have it at less than 5% on average, where service foremost and industry, to a lesser degree, is dominating.
 

Yahya

VIP
2020 GRANDMASTER
How you gonna get the water, drilling? If wheels can sustain farmland then how there water shortages in North Somalia?
We dig boreholes and wells my brother. There are those who do in this life and those who don't. Lets stop making excuses. Also planting trees has helped to recycle the water and stop surface run off and evaporation on our farms.
 

Aurelian

Forza Somalia!
VIP
We dig boreholes and wells my brother. There are those who do in this life and those who don't. Lets stop making excuses. Also planting trees has helped to recycle the water and stop surface run off and evaporation on our farms.
So there a lot of ground waters in that region?
 
More people probably making the shift. Some of my own relatives are involved with projects in Puntland and Somaliland that work to help pastoralists, agro-pastoralists and traditional farmers make a full shift toward being settled, modernized farmers. They've succeeded in shifting over a lot of people over the years.

Personally, I'd also push them toward more regenerative ranching and farming like rotational grazing, more perennial or perennial mixed cropping and techniques like crop rotation. Make Somalia an organic, locally grown food superpower, saxiibs.
My Subclan are still nomads today
 

Removed

Gif-King
Agribusiness is booming. Places that historically looked down on farming are now agricultural powerhouses. Godey Garissa Afmadow Buale Goobweyn etc all have rapidly growing farmlands now.

This would have been unthinkable not that long ago.
 
Generally true for most of SL yes, however the Southwestern territories (Borama, Gabiley and parts of southern Hargeisa) are more than fit for farming. Sorghum, corn and common fruits/vegetables are grown locally. Most of the tribes inhabiting those lands are farmers as well as cattle and camel herders. It is also true for most of west DDSI.
But obviously, the nature of the land is very different from southern Somalia’s riverine states. I guess you won’t see the same type of farms there.
The only Agro-pastoral land in the North, the only other places that come close or even better are the Sorghum high potential Agro-pastoral Middle shabelle & the Bay/Bakool Low potential Agro-pastoral lands in the South. They’re better off due to the rivers flowing through. If we had been blessed with atleast 1 river through Borama-Gabiley-Hargeisa we’d be fit enough to feed the whole North + K5.
 
Our ancestors should’ve picked up Agriculture. I guess you reap what you sow.

We could’ve been an Agricultural power-house, we could’ve had a positive outlook on life, with good income for families, food security and resilience among an Agricultural community.

Now majority of Somaliweyne is degraded land & unfit for farming because of Low IQ Geeljires. That’s what happens when a group closed off theirselves in the Africa & not learn of the outside world.

Some of the Eastern Oromo clans we’re better off when they picked up Agro-pastoralism earlier on in their lands. Now their lands are lush & green, fit for farming & livestock production compared to the Western Oromos that border use with the same Low IQ practises. Plus the Southern Ethiopians like the Sidama, who practised Agroforestry for sustainable agriculture.
 

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