Anyone know the whereabouts of Adeero GRANT? The Somali loving cadaan who shared his pictures at the time he spent in Jilib.

Grigori Rasputin

“No more your dad” “your mom loofs me”
Staff Member
Wariyaha SomaliSpot
Is the man alive ?
Has he survived Covid19

@Grant what is going on with you

I want to host you on Clubhouse to asked questions about your time in Somalia in the 1960s
 
Is the man alive ?
Has he survived Covid19

@Grant what is going on with you

I want to host you on Clubhouse to asked questions about your time in Somalia in the 1960s

Still around but very busy. Moved from California to Utah, bought a second house as a store/workshop. Working now to fix up both and get settled.

What is Clubhouse?
 

Grigori Rasputin

“No more your dad” “your mom loofs me”
Staff Member
Wariyaha SomaliSpot
@Grant

I am glad to hear from you my friend.
it seems that you lurk around here but you don’t participate in the discussions.
have you not watched my take on Somali history from the late 1800s to the 1970s?
clubhouse is an audio conference where a group of people can have a discussion. It would be awesome to host you there so I can learn how it was like in Somalia in the 1960s.
 

Grigori Rasputin

“No more your dad” “your mom loofs me”
Staff Member
Wariyaha SomaliSpot
Adeero @Grant has treasure trove of photographs of Somalia in the 1960s. He must transfer all of it to me so I can post it on my YouTube for save keeping.
@Grant how’s Utah? Will the town you move into have winter ?
 
Adeero @Grant has treasure trove of photographs of Somalia in the 1960s. He must transfer all of it to me so I can post it on my YouTube for save keeping.
@Grant how’s Utah? Will the town you move into have winter ?


Search: Jilib in 1966.. Celidheere posted it.

My PC group is dropping like flies. We are all near or over 80. Individuals are donating their photos, artifacts etc.to various institutions but mostly Stanford and the Somali Museum in Minnesota. I have given mine to the Museum of History and Art in Fairview, Utah.

The town is above 6,000 feet and the plateau to the east gets above 11,000. We can get snow in October and still have some on the ground in May. This is sheep and cattle country. The first crop of irrigated hay is cut the second week of June. Many families run their herds on the mountain in summer and on the West Desert in winter. Some years they have to supplement with hay, and others feed hay and some grain all winter. This can be six months.

I will be happy to answer specific questions, but Clubhouse is not of interest.
 

Grigori Rasputin

“No more your dad” “your mom loofs me”
Staff Member
Wariyaha SomaliSpot
Search: Jilib in 1966.. Celidheere posted it.

My PC group is dropping like flies. We are all near or over 80. Individuals are donating their photos, artifacts etc.to various institutions but mostly Stanford and the Somali Museum in Minnesota. I have given mine to the Museum of History and Art in Fairview, Utah.

The town is above 6,000 feet and the plateau to the east gets above 11,000. We can get snow in October and still have some on the ground in May. This is sheep and cattle country. The first crop of irrigated hay is cut the second week of June. Many families run their herds on the mountain in summer and on the West Desert in winter. Some years they have to supplement with hay, and others feed hay and some grain all winter. This can be six months.

I will be happy to answer specific questions, but Clubhouse is not of interest.

What was your meals in Jilib? For breakfast, lunch and dinner ?

Any of you got serious food poisoning?

It seems like that Somalia has left you with big impression. Is it because you’re a reminiscing your youthful days ?
 
We tried very hard not to discusd qabil, so I could have unknowingly missed one. But no.

Okay have you been to Mareerey,Mugaambo,Hargeisa Yareey or just Jilib town? Also do you have more photos of the area that you haven’t posted yet.
 
Okay have you been to Mareerey,Mugaambo,Hargeisa Yareey or just Jilib town? Also do you have more photos of the area that you haven’t posted yet.

I know Mareerey only as a Reewiin clan stronghold, crushed by the Italians in the first years of the 20th century. The sugar project that opened the area to other clans began in 1977. I left in 1967, also I think before the other two settlements opened up. I do not know them.
I spent a few days each in Hargeisa and Mog, a few weeks at Taleex, several days each at Eyl and Jamaama, a week in Baraawe and a day and night every other week banking/shopping in Kismayu. I was isolated in Jilib for 10 months because of the muddy roads from an extended Gu in 1967.
Sorry I can't help.
 

Hot Ballah

I do something called "what I want"
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@Grant How old are you? 1966 in Jilib is a few years before even my mom was born and she’s nearly 50 lol.

I’m guessing you’re the same age as my awoowe who was born in the late 40s.
 
What was your meals in Jilib? For breakfast, lunch and dinner ?

Any of you got serious food poisoning?

It seems like that Somalia has left you with big impression. Is it because you’re a reminiscing your youthful days ?

I ate lots of soor, mufo, rice and pasto, often Italian rolls with shah for breakfast. The meat was cheap but very tough, even fillet. I got a meat grinder to make hamburger for salisburry steaks and chile with the local diger. Laxoox and sambusa were occasional treats. My favorite breakfast was mufo with beer ari.

I had near daily diarrhea when eating with the other PC members at Taleex and threw up once after a meal with a Farsi family in Kismayu, but I never got sick from food in Jilib. The Somali food I got was always fresh and well cooked. I ate well.

Somalia greatly affected all of us. David Laitin and John Johnson made academic careers out of it. Half a dozen others maintain contact in the North and two were observers at the most recent election.

I still have contacts in the South, as you know.
 

Grigori Rasputin

“No more your dad” “your mom loofs me”
Staff Member
Wariyaha SomaliSpot
I ate lots of soor, mufo, rice and pasto, often Italian rolls with shah for breakfast. The meat was cheap but very tough, even fillet. I got a meat grinder to make hamburger for salisburry steaks and chile with the local diger. Laxoox and sambusa were occasional treats. My favorite breakfast was mufo with beer ari.

I had near daily diarrhea when eating with the other PC members at Taleex and threw up once after a meal with a Farsi family in Kismayu, but I never got sick from food in Jilib. The Somali food I got was always fresh and well cooked. I ate well.

Somalia greatly affected all of us. David Laitin and John Johnson made academic careers out of it. Half a dozen others maintain contact in the North and two were observers at the most recent election.

I still have contacts in the South, as you know.

@Grant do you remember the time I linked you up with folks that knew the people on your photographs? Did you continue your search for your friend? Was my effort helpful? If not, I can take it to another level now that we have a booming somali Social media.

Would you up for a visit by me to your town. We can meet in a public cafe spot where I ask away.
 

Grigori Rasputin

“No more your dad” “your mom loofs me”
Staff Member
Wariyaha SomaliSpot
wow, that’s amazing.

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Ilaahay ma taqaanaa! How are you gonna believe your awoowe. That’s the date he picked from the figments of his imagination. Birth days were never recorded except for the few that were born in a modern colonizer’s hospital. There were like 3 hospitals throughout the land. What’s the chance that your grandpa was born there. Next to nothing. :drakewtf:
 

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