CULTURE A Somali documentary video(reposted) that you should watch.

Someone posted this video before but I couldn’t find the original thread. It’s 20 minute long and absolutely fascinating! It even explains some of the issues we face today, like the overly industrious, resilient women(even children)and the neglectful, unproductive or absent men. I always assumed this was because of the war but it seems like it dates back at least 70 years but probably even longer.

 

Timo Jareer and proud

2nd Emir of the Akh Right Movement
unproductive/absent men? I've watched this documentary with my adeer before & never remember that being stated. Closest I recall is the narrator saying somali women work harder than the men :cosbyhmm:
 
unproductive/absent men? I've watched this documentary with my adeer before & never remember that being stated. Closest I recall is the narrator saying somali women work harder than the men :cosbyhmm:
What’s worse than a community where the women work harder than men 🤔 this sentence alone indicates everything. The narrator also says the women are always working. As you can clearly see from their daily activities, the father has no place in it. The house building, food preparation, clothes/carpet making, water fetching = women, and the children herd the animals. So where’s the father in all this? The only two times we see him is at beginning and even then the women unload the camel. And again at the end, when he goes to the market to buy a camel.

Everything doesn’t have to be told to you explicitly you can read a lot by just observing. The narrator says “the home disassembly/assembly” is solely a women work and no man would be caught dead doing it. What kinda culture normalizes that a man sit and watch while his place of sleep, his home is being built by his wife?. That’s essentially like if cadaan men said today home construction is no place for a man 😂
 
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Timo Jareer and proud

2nd Emir of the Akh Right Movement
What’s worse then a community where the women worker harder then men 🤔 this sentence alone indicates everything. The narrator also says the women are always working. As you can clearly see from their daily activities, the father has no place in it. The house building, food preparing, clothes carpet making, water fetching = women, and the children herd the animals. So where’s the father in all this? The only two times we see him is at beginning and even then the women unload the camel. And again at the end, when he goes to the market to buy a camel.

Everything doesn’t have to be told you to explicitly you can read a lot by just observing. The narrator says “the home disassembly/assembly” is solely a women work and no man would be caught dead doing it. What kinda culture normalizes that a man sit and watch while his place of sleep, his home is being built by his wife?. That’s essentially like if cadaan men said today home construction is no place for a man 😂
Fathers herd the camels with the boys, the reason why you barely get to see the aabo in the video is probably because of the video focuses on his son mostly. My awoowe was a nomad for reference on why ik this:cosbyhmm:


You are right about women working more tho, but men were not just on their asses doing nothing.
 
What’s worse than a community where the women work harder than men 🤔 this sentence alone indicates everything. The narrator also says the women are always working. As you can clearly see from their daily activities, the father has no place in it. The house building, food preparation, clothes/carpet making, water fetching = women, and the children herd the animals. So where’s the father in all this? The only two times we see him is at beginning and even then the women unload the camel. And again at the end, when he goes to the market to buy a camel.

Everything doesn’t have to be told to you explicitly you can read a lot by just observing. The narrator says “the home disassembly/assembly” is solely a women work and no man would be caught dead doing it. What kinda culture normalizes that a man sit and watch while his place of sleep, his home is being built by his wife?. That’s essentially like if cadaan men said today home construction is no place for a man 😂
This is a pretty long text for someone who's just observing, you seemed to have analysed and made a full report on the uselessness of Somali men.
Is this your thesis for your PhD studies in Somali feminism? :russ:
 
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This is a pretty long text for someone who's just observing, you seemed to have analysed and made a full report on the uselessness of Somali men.
Is this your thesis for your PhD studies in Somali feminism? :russ:
Haha! Was that suppose to be funny? Did you feel like you just cracked the best joke of the century? Lol smh
 
Fathers herd the camels with the boys, the reason why you barely get to see the aabo in the video is probably because of the video focuses on his son mostly. My awoowe was a nomad for reference on why ik this:cosbyhmm:


You are right about women working more tho, but men were not just on their asses doing nothing.
Timo, I actually called my grandma after your last comment and asked her myself. She said the men did have their own duties. They were responsible for number of duties like scouting new territories, selling and buying food supplies/animals and the construction of enclosure for the animals. She said after the early morning hours when the animals were released until the “early fiid” the men were free and gathered under big oak trees in groups, where the women would take camel milk in a jug called “dill”, tea and cups to them and they’d sit sheeko iyo shaah until the animals came home around fiid.

Now, knowing this... It’s no wonder why then even now x miles away from our homeland, you’ll find large Somali men sitting in coffeeshops in groups for hours on end Idle. Old habits die hard even if it is via ancestrally...

FYI, this is “dill”
 
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Timo Jareer and proud

2nd Emir of the Akh Right Movement
Timo, I actually called my grandma after your last comment and asked her myself. She said the men did have their own duties. They were responsible for number of duties like scouting new territories, selling and buying food supplies/animals and the construction of enclosure for the animals. She said after the early morning hours when the animals were released until the “early fiid” the men were free and gathered under big oak trees in groups, where the women would take camel milk in a jug called “dill”, tea and cups to them and they’d sit sheeko iyo shaah until the animals came home around fiid.

Now, knowing this... It’s no wonder why then even now x miles away from our homeland, you’ll find large Somali men sitting in coffeeshops in groups for hours on end Idle. Old habits die hard even if it is via ancestrally...

FYI, this is “dill”
Yea most Somalis never adapted well when coming to the west. Most of our parents gen raised their kids like they were still in baadiyo here. Turning Tim Hortons/other coffee shops into their own makhaayada's :dead: and expecting the community to help raise their children.

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I actually own two diil's they're displayed in my living room on a shelf to show off soomaali dhaqan to any guests coming over. I'll try taking a pic tomorrow when Im free & post it here :damnmusic:
 

Desert Flower

Staff Member
Yea most Somalis never adapted well when coming to the west. Most of our parents gen raised their kids like they were still in baadiyo here. Turning Tim Hortons/other coffee shops into their own makhaayada's :dead: and expecting the community to help raise their children.

View attachment 173311


I actually own two diil's they're displayed in my living room on a shelf to show off soomaali dhaqan to any guests coming over. I'll try taking a pic tomorrow when Im free & post it here :damnmusic:
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Yea most Somalis never adapted well when coming to the west. Most of our parents gen raised their kids like they were still in baadiyo here. Turning Tim Hortons/other coffee shops into their own makhaayada's :dead: and expecting the community to help raise their children.

View attachment 173311


I actually own two diil's they're displayed in my living room on a shelf to show off soomaali dhaqan to any guests coming over. I'll try taking a pic tomorrow when Im free & post it here :damnmusic:
Lol! Post them! Where did you get them from? Are they functional?
 

bobsburger

I am NOT a federal agent
how do you turn an innocent documentary about a nomadic boy into a somali male hate train? :mindblown: I understand that ur aabo left hooyo but that doesn't give u right to hate on us.
 

Boogie

Islam wins doesnt take Ls Long Live Somalia 🇸🇴
how do you turn an innocent documentary about a nomadic boy into a somali male hate train? :mindblown: I understand that ur aabo left hooyo but that doesn't give u right to hate on us.
Brother just ignore and listen to quran
 

bobsburger

I am NOT a federal agent
In the west especially in America most farax work hard. They drive truck and be gone for like a month without stopping, they own stores, they have tax filing services, they are cab drivers, they own electronic businesses. I have never ever in my life met a farax over 24 who is jobless. U nikkas are beyond reaching.
 
how do you turn an innocent documentary about a nomadic boy into a somali male hate train? :mindblown: I understand that ur aabo left hooyo but that doesn't give u right to hate on us.
Did you watch the documentary? How can a documentary from the early 60s note that women used to do more than the men? I even read a historical account from the 1800s and this is something people noticed. Is it wrong to point this out?
 

Hot Ballah

I do something called "what I want"
VIP
lol it’s obvious a bunch of you guys have no idea about what happens in baadiye. My mom who grew up in Somalia during the ‘70s and ‘80s lived a strict life there and would tell me stories about what geeljires used to do while herding camels.

For example, when a female camel was pregnant, she’d often go kilometres away from the camp to find a private place to give birth. During this time a geeljire would have to follow her to make sure she didn’t get lost or get killed by Dhurwah (coyotes). He’d walk with her on foot for kilometres with just a bag of muqmat and caano. (I actually didn’t even believe this at first and did my research and turns out, it’s true).
06784EE4-FB6D-4550-B9DC-255EAA1197ED.jpeg

He’d do this starting from an age as young as 12.

You also said “only time you see the father is in the beginning and end when he came back from the market selling/buying”. My hooyo also told me that often times the nearest town/market would be tens of kilometres away and the geeljire would have a couple camels with him and he’d be away from his family for weeks and maybe even months, just to sell his camels and buy resources like knives, clothes etc.

There’s a reason why they’re called geeljire. Because afar iyo labaatanka saac geel bey lajiraan.

So yes, after being away from their family for weeks and months, spending cold nights in the desert and hot arid days digging up sand to find water. Or herding off coyotes from killing the few camels he’s supposed to sell, I sure hope he’d be at least treated with some caano and bariis when he does have some rest time herding camels. My mom who actually grew up in baadiye always had immense respect for both her dad and her brothers.

It’s really sad when you have to take a well-intended documentary face value to try and nitpick over your own culture. But how can I blame you, you’re a western-raised halimo who knows nothing better than to complain about men.
 

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